ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Stap, Lennert Bastiaan; van de Wal, Roderik S W; de Boer, Bas; Köhler, Peter; Hoencamp, Jori H; Lohmann, Gerrit; Tuenter, Erik; Lourens, Lucas Joost (2018): Modeled influence of land ice and CO2 on polar amplification and paleoclimate sensitivity during the past 5 million years. Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology, https://doi.org/10.1002/2017PA003313
    Publication Date: 2019-04-30
    Description: Model output of the intermediate complexity climate model CLIMBER-2 over the past 5 million years. The simulations were forced with insolation data (O), insolation and land ice data (OI), insolation and carbon dioxide data (OC) and with insolation, land ice and carbon dioxide data (OIC). Sheet 1 contains the main results: northern hemispheric (30-90 deg N), southern hemispheric (30-90 deg S) and global temperatures. Sheet 2 contains the land ice and carbon dioxide forcing in terms of globally averaged radiative forcing. Details are given in the publication. More information or data can be obtained by contacting L.B. Stap (lennert.stap@awi.de).
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/octet-stream, 538.0 kBytes
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2019-01-27
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 275 data points
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2017-12-19
    Description: The evidence from both data and models indicates that specific equilibrium climate sensitivity S[X]—the global annual mean surface temperature change (ΔTg) as a response to a change in radiative forcing X (ΔR[X])—is state dependent. Such a state dependency implies that the best fit in the scatterplot of ΔTg versus ΔR[X] is not a linear regression but can be some nonlinear or even nonsmooth function. While for the conventional linear case the slope (gradient) of the regression is correctly interpreted as the specific equilibrium climate sensitivity S[X], the interpretation is not straightforward in the nonlinear case. We here explain how such a state-dependent scatterplot needs to be interpreted and provide a theoretical understanding—or generalization—how to quantify S[X] in the nonlinear case. Finally, from data covering the last 2.1 Myr we show that—due to state dependency—the specific equilibrium climate sensitivity which considers radiative forcing of CO2 and land ice sheet (LI) albedo, math formula, is larger during interglacial states than during glacial conditions by more than a factor 2.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-06-26
    Description: Polar amplification and specific equilibrium climate sensitivity (S) have been the subject of many paleoclimate studies. While earlier studies inferred them as single constant parameters of the climate system, there are now indications that both are conditioned by the type of forcing. Moreover, they might be affected by fast feedback mechanisms that have different strengths depending on the background climate. Here, we use the intermediate complexity climate model CLIMBER-2 to study the influence of land ice and CO2 on polar amplification and S. We perform transient five-million-year simulations, forced by different combinations of insolation, land ice and CO2. We find that land ice and CO2 changes have separate effects on temperature, both on the global mean and the meridional distribution. Land ice changes are mainly manifested in the high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. They lead to 77% higher northern polar amplification, 38% lower southern polar amplification, and 42% lower S than homogeneously distributed CO2 changes. Furthermore, towards colder climates northern polar amplification increases, and consequently southern polar amplification decreases, due to the albedo-temperature feedback. As an effect, a global average temperature change calculated from high-latitude temperatures by using a constant polar amplification would lead to errors of up to 0.6 K in our model set-up. We conclude that to constrain feedback strengths and climate sensitivity in climate models by paleoclimate data, the underlying forcing mechanisms and background climate states have to be taken into consideration.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-04-16
    Description: Climate change projections for the future are uncertain, also due to inter-model differences. The application of these models to paleo times, which can be constrained by reconstructions, is therefore essential, not only to gain a better understanding of past climate changes, but also for model validation purposes. In this respect both data- and model-based approaches have been used to generate time series of global temperature changes, ∆Tg. The ratio of ∆Tg over radiative forcing, ∆R, defines the specific equilibrium climate sensitivity S, and has been suggested to be state-dependent, potentially increasing towards warming climates, and therefore suggesting climate sensitivity for the future to be at the upper end of the range of published results (Köhler et al., 2015, 2017). Here we reanalyse existing time series of ∆Tg and ∆R for the last 800,000 years and show that this proposed state-dependency of S is only found if ∆Tg is based on data (reconstructions), and not if ∆Tg is based on models (simulations). We furthermore identify that in data-based reconstructions ∆Tg is decoupled from atmospheric CO2 predominantely during times of decreasing obliquity (identical to periods of land-ice sheet growth and sea level fall), while in model simulations ∆Tg and CO2 vary in phase throughout. This multi-millennial decoupling of CO2 and temperature has been suggested to be partially caused by a sea level-induced surge in magma and CO2 fluxes from oceanic hotspot volcanoes and mid ocean ridges (Hasenclever et al., 2017). The neglection of these feedbacks between the solid Earth and the climate system in recent Earth system models is partly responsible for the data/model misfit, and illustrates our current limitation in the model-based interpretation of the paleo records. Paleo-based estimates of S might be restricted to data without this ∆Tg-CO2-decoupling leading to a 20% smaller quantification of S for interglacial conditions of the late Pleistocene.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2019-02-01
    Description: We reanalyze existing paleodata of global mean surface temperature ΔTg and radiative forcing ΔR of CO2 and land ice albedo for the last 800,000 years to show that a state‐dependency in paleoclimate sensitivity S, as previously suggested, is only found if ΔTg is based on reconstructions, and not when ΔTg is based on model simulations. Furthermore, during times of decreasing obliquity (periods of land‐ice sheet growth and sea level fall) the multi‐millennial component of reconstructed ΔTg diverges from CO2, while in simulations both variables vary more synchronously, suggesting that the differences during these times are due to relatively low rates of simulated land ice growth and associated cooling. To produce a reconstruction‐based extrapolation of S for the future we exclude intervals with strong ΔTg‐CO2 divergence and find that S is less state‐dependent, or even constant (state‐independent), yielding a mean equilibrium warming of 2–4 K for a doubling of CO2.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    PANGAEA
    Publication Date: 2016-03-24
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: PANGAEA Documentation , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet
    Format: application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2018-04-16
    Description: Some studies suggest that specific equilibrium climate sensitivity S might be state-dependent. Reanalyzing existing paleodata of global mean surface temperature ∆Tg and radiative forcing ∆R of CO2 and land ice albedo for the last 800,000 years we show that this state-dependency of S is only found if ∆Tg is based on reconstructions, and not when ∆Tg is based on model simulations. Furthermore, during times of decreasing obliquity (periods of land-ice sheet growth and sea level fall) the multi-millennial component of reconstructed ∆Tg is diverging from atmospheric CO2, while in simulations both variables vary more synchronously. For a reconstruction-based extrapolation of S to the future we eliminate these periods due to an expected sea level rise. Consequently, S determined from proxy-based reconstructions without these data with strong ∆Tg-CO2 divergence is less state-dependent or even constant (state-independent), and yields into an equilibrium warming for 2 × CO2 of 1.9–3.8 K.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2017-10-04
    Description: Since the inception of the Antarctic ice sheet at the Eocene–Oligocene transition (∼ 34 Myr ago), land ice has played a crucial role in Earth's climate. Through feedbacks in the climate system, land ice variability modifies atmospheric temperature changes induced by orbital, topographical, and greenhouse gas variations. Quantification of these feedbacks on long timescales has hitherto scarcely been undertaken. In this study, we use a zonally averaged energy balance climate model bidirectionally coupled to a one-dimensional ice sheet model, capturing the ice–albedo and surface–height–temperature feedbacks. Potentially important transient changes in topographic boundary conditions by tectonics and erosion are not taken into account but are briefly discussed. The relative simplicity of the coupled model allows us to perform integrations over the past 38 Myr in a fully transient fashion using a benthic oxygen isotope record as forcing to inversely simulate CO2. Firstly, we find that the results of the simulations over the past 5 Myr are dependent on whether the model run is started at 5 or 38 Myr ago. This is because the relation between CO2 and temperature is subject to hysteresis. When the climate cools from very high CO2 levels, as in the longer transient 38 Myr run, temperatures in the lower CO2 range of the past 5 Myr are higher than when the climate is initialised at low temperatures. Consequently, the modelled CO2 concentrations depend on the initial state. Taking the realistic warm initialisation into account, we come to a best estimate of CO2, temperature, ice-volume-equivalent sea level, and benthic δ18O over the past 38 Myr. Secondly, we study the influence of ice sheets on the evolution of global temperature and polar amplification by comparing runs with ice sheet–climate interaction switched on and off. By passing only albedo or surface height changes to the climate model, we can distinguish the separate effects of the ice–albedo and surface–height–temperature feedbacks. We find that ice volume variability has a strong enhancing effect on atmospheric temperature changes, particularly in the regions where the ice sheets are located. As a result, polar amplification in the Northern Hemisphere decreases towards warmer climates as there is little land ice left to melt. Conversely, decay of the Antarctic ice sheet increases polar amplification in the Southern Hemisphere in the high-CO2 regime. Our results also show that in cooler climates than the pre-industrial, the ice–albedo feedback predominates the surface–height–temperature feedback, while in warmer climates they are more equal in strength.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2019-01-02
    Description: We reanalyze existing paleodata of global mean surface temperature ΔTg and radiative forcing ΔR of CO2 and land ice albedo for the last 800,000 years to show that a state‐dependency in paleoclimate sensitivity S, as previously suggested, is only found if ΔTg is based on reconstructions, and not when ΔTg is based on model simulations. Furthermore, during times of decreasing obliquity (periods of land ice sheet growth and sea level fall) the multimillennial component of reconstructed ΔTg diverges from CO2, while in simulations both variables vary more synchronously, suggesting that the differences during these times are due to relatively low rates of simulated land ice growth and associated cooling. To produce a reconstruction‐based extrapolation of S for the future, we exclude intervals with strong ΔTg‐CO2 divergence and find that S is less state‐dependent, or even constant state‐independent), yielding a mean equilibrium warming of 2–4 K for a doubling of CO2.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...