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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2012-02-23
    Type: Conference or Workshop Item , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 2
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    Copernicus Publications
    In:  [Poster] In: EGU General Assembly 2012, 22.-27.04.2012, Vienna, Austria . Geophysical Research Abstracts ; EGU2012-12550 .
    Publication Date: 2012-12-12
    Description: EGU2012-12550 Carbonate mounds are important contributors of life in different settings, from warm-water to cold-water environments, and throughout geological history. Research on modern cold-water coral carbonate mounds over the last decades made a major contribution to our overall understanding of these particular sedimentary systems. By looking to the modern carbonate mound community with cold-water corals as main framework builders, some fundamental questions could be addressed, until now not yet explored in fossil mound settings. The international network COCARDE (http://www.cocarde.eu) is a platform for exploring new insights in carbonate mound research of recent and ancient mound systems. The aim of the COCARDE network is to bring together scientific communities, studying Recent carbonate mounds in midslope environments in the present ocean and investigating fossil mounds spanning the whole Phanerozoic time, respectively. Scientific challenges in modern and ancient carbonate mound research got well defined during the ESF Magellan Workshop COCARDE in Fribourg, Switzerland (21.–24.01.2009). The Special Volume Cold-water Carbonate Reservoir systems in Deep Environments – COCARDE (Marine Geology, Vol. 282) was the major outcome of this meeting and highlights the diversity of Recent arbonate mound studies. The following first jointWorkshop and Field Seminar held in Oviedo, Spain (16.–20.09.2009) highlighted ongoing research from both Recent and fossil academic groups integrating the message from the industry. The field seminar focused on mounds from the Carboniferous platform of Asturias and Cantabria, already intensively visited by industrial and academic researchers. However, by comparing ancient, mixed carbonate-siliciclastic mound systems of Cantabria with the Recent ones in the Porcupine Seabight, striking similarities in their genesis and processes in mound development asked for an integrated drilling campaign to understand better the 3D internal mound build-up. The Oviedo Workshop and Field Seminar led to the submission of a White Paper on Carbonate Mound Drilling and the initiation of the ESF European Research Network Programme Cold-Water Carbonate Mounds in Shallow and Deep Time – The European Research Network (COCARDE-ERN) launched in June 2011. The second COCARDE Workshop and Field Seminar was held in Rabat, Morocco (24.–30.10.2011) and thematically focussed on carbonate mounds of(f) Morocco. The compact workshop invited students from Moroccan Universities to experience ongoing carbonate mound research in Recent and Ancient environments of Morocco. Two Round Tables discussed innovative approaches in carbonate mound research in Morocco (Recent vs. Ancient - offshore vs. onshore) and reviewed together with oil industry opportunities of international collaboration. The outcome of this workshop will lead into joint research projects, drilling campaigns on- and offshore, and expansion of COCARDE onto the African continent.
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2018-03-23
    Description: The aim of the present study was to compare preservation, staining and preparation techniques to assess the influence of different sample treatments and analyses on the accuracy of benthic foraminiferal assemblage data from NE Atlantic shelf seas. Replicate surface samples from the SE North Sea were preserved with ethanol–rose Bengal or formalin, some were stained after processing, or foraminifera were concentrated by flotation. Coloration of living specimens was different between samples treated with an ethanol–rose Bengal solution and those stained after washing. In the latter case, only the last two or three chambers were stained. The aliquot sample preserved with formalin showed dissolution features in agglutinated and porcellaneous species. Population density varied between different preservation, picking modes and investigators. The accuracy of picking was in the range of ±2 % (1σ), while external reproducibility ranged from –34 to +16 %. There was no significant difference between wet and dry picking. Samples that were concentrated by flotation generally yielded a lower number of specimens. Agglutinated species were underrepresented in samples that were stained after washing and in the flotation concentrate. Size fractions showed a reduction of population density and Fisher alpha diversity index with increasing mesh size. Only half of the specimens and less than two-thirds of the species are captured if the 〉125 μm rather than 〉63 μm fraction is analysed. In oxygen minimum zones, where small-sized species dominate the assemblage, the recovery in larger size fractions could be lower
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  • 4
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    In:  [Talk] In: International Symposium on Foraminifera FORAMS 2014, 19.-24.01.2014, Concepcion, Chile .
    Publication Date: 2017-03-10
    Type: Conference or Workshop Item , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 5
    ISSN: 1365-3121
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Geosciences
    Notes: The Eocene–Oligocene transition marks the passage from ‘greenhouse’ conditions to an ‘icehouse’ state, with progressive global cooling starting in the early middle Eocene. The late Eocene presents substantial evidence for extraterrestrial impacts whose effects on living organisms and climatic changes are still not completely clear. A high-resolution, microfloral and faunal investigation has been carried out in a 4-m-thick segment of the Massignano Global Stratotype Section and Point for the Eocene–Oligocene boundary. The studied interval includes a late Eocene (35.7 ± 0.4 Myr old) impactoclastic layer containing several cosmic signatures. The impact event recorded at Massignano had no abrupt, dramatic effects on marine biota in terms of extinction. However, significant quantitative changes in the calcareous plankton and dinoflagellate cyst assemblages occurred 60 kyr after the impact event. The observed pattern is intepreted as reflecting a long-term re-organization of water structure.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2017-08-08
    Description: Over a decade of research on recent cold-water coral mounds in various oceans has set the stage for comparative studies between recent and ancient carbonate mound systems, with the aim to unravel generic processes and reveal the “red thread” in a fundamental strategy of Life building Geology — a strategy nearly as ancient as Life itself. Natural laboratories have been identified in the present ocean, which provide new insights in oceanographic controls on species migration and settlement, in the interaction of currents and carbonate build-up, in the earliest diagenesis which overprints environmental signals and shapes the template of compartmentalization of carbonate build-ups, and in so many other processes and factors ultimately shaping carbonate bodies, comparable in size and properties to the large-scale carbonate hydrocarbon reservoirs in the geological record. Ocean drilling and coring is an essential component of this research. Ideally, this process is a two-way avenue between Shallow and Deep Time, where fundamental and industrial knowledge about fossil carbonate mounds can drive further investigations and even experimentation in the present seas, while the discoveries and process studies on “live” systems can yield new insights in the architecture and evolution of ancient reservoir systems. This bridging exercise is the quintessence of COCARDE (Cold-Water Carbonate Reservoir Systems in Deep Environments), an international network under the auspices of IOC-UNESCO (http://www.cocarde.eu). COCARDE has organised two workshops in 2009, with a significant support of European programmes (e.g. ESF Magellan workshop series) and partner projects (e.g. ESF EuroDIVERSITY project MiCROSYSTEMS). This special issue groups 12 papers, all addressing observations which by their nature have the potential to provide keys to generic processes, of relevance for past carbonate systems. As COCARDE proceeds, it is the objective to “reciprocate” in near future with an equivalent grouping of contributions from the study of fossil studies, to guide further research in the present ocean. It is the purpose of COCARDE to strengthen such a reflux from the studies of fossil systems by stimulating relevant continental drilling exercises, with comparable sampling protocols, resolution and analytical procedures – where relevant – to allow direct comparisons with records from ocean drilling. The papers in this special issue have been structured in four themes: (i) keys to palaeoenvironmental control, (ii) mound initiation, growth and demise, (iii) of microbes and mounds, and (iv) tracking organominerals — Recent and Ancient.
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2012-02-23
    Type: Conference or Workshop Item , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 8
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    Elsevier
    In:  Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers, 56 . pp. 2216-2234.
    Publication Date: 2016-11-01
    Description: Cold-water coral ecosystems building cold-water carbonate mounds occur worldwide and are especially developed along the European margin, from northern Norway to the Gulf of Cadiz. A remarkable mound province is documented southwest of Ireland along the Porcupine and Rockall Banks. In this area carbonate mounds are formed in water depths between 500 and 1200 m and are often densely settled by cold-water coral ecosystems offering many ecological niches for benthic foraminifera. We investigated total (unstained) benthic foraminiferal assemblages from surface sediments (0–1 cm, 〉63 μm size fraction) of this region with the aim to trace their distribution patterns and to test if they can be used as bioindicators for facies characterization in different parts of carbonate mound systems. Our quantitative data were further statistically treated with non-metric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) based on Bray–Curtis similarity matrix to highlight community patterns that were not readily apparent. Our results indicate that different benthic foraminiferal assemblages characterize different facies along cold-water carbonate mounds and are related to the environmental conditions and available substrates. The following facies can be described: (1) the Off-Mound Facies is dominated by uvigerinids and other infaunal species; (2) the Dropstone Facies is characterized by infaunal Globocassidulina subglobosa and attached-epifaunal Cibicidoides sp.; (3) the Dead Coral Facies is characterised by epifaunal species (e.g., Planulina ariminensis, Hanzawaia boueana) and infaunal species (Spiroplectinella wrightii, Angulogerina angulosa, Epistominella vitrea); (4) the Living Coral Facies includes both infaunal and epifaunal species, but is dominated by the epifaunal Discanomalina coronata; and (5) the Sandwave Facies contains high abundances of epifaunal species including D. coronata. Based on this distribution, we propose D. coronata, as an indicator species to identify active mounds and/or living cold-water coral ecosystems. Our results also emphasise the importance of studying the small size fractions that yield many infaunal species. A causal link exists between distribution patterns of benthic foraminifera and cold-water coral facies, thus providing an independent tool to identify and describe the different facies in this setting.
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2017-06-23
    Description: During the TTR-17 Leg 1 cruise in the West Alboran Basin, gravity cores were acquired from three mud volcanoes (MVs): Dhaka, Carmen and the recently discovered Maya. This paper presents micropaleontological and radiocarbon dating results from the three mud volcanoes, using cores containing mud breccias overlain by and interbedded with hemipelagic sediments. At Dhaka MV, the mud-breccia matrix contains very rare Holocene planktonic foraminifera associated with abundant reworked specimens of mixed Late Cretaceous to Mio-Pliocene age. At Carmen MV, the reworked assemblage is dominated by Miocene to Pliocene foraminifera occurring together with rare Late Cretaceous species while at Maya MV the mud-breccia matrix is characterized by the dominance of Santonian-Maastrichtian forms, with subordinate Tertiary species. Shallow-water benthic foraminifera such as Ammonia spp. and Elphidium spp. are generally rare and randomly distributed, but present at all studied sites. Based on these results, we suggest that the main sediment source of the mud-breccia extruded at Dhaka, Carmen and Maya MVs is possibly the lowermost overpressured olistostromic Unit VI (Aquitanian?-Burdigalian). Differences in the micropaleontological composition of the mud-breccia matrix at different sites are most likely due to differences in the main source layer and in the plumbing systems underneath the MVs. Radiocarbon dating of hemipelagic sediments associated to the mud-breccia allowed to define the age of the latest extrusion activities (〉0.27 ka to 〉15.6 ka BP), which seem to be episodic, short-lived and recurrent over thousands of years
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  • 10
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    Cushman Foundation for Foraminiferal Research
    In:  Journal of Foraminiferal Research, 43 (1). pp. 21-39.
    Publication Date: 2016-05-25
    Description: Quantitative investigations on the total (living + dead) benthic foraminiferal assemblages were performed on 32 surface-sediment samples (0–2 cm, .63-mm size fraction) from water depths ranging from 110–600 m (‘‘on-reef’’) to .2000 m (‘‘off-reef’’) in the Oslo Fjord (Skagerrak Basin), the mid-Norwegian slope (Sula, Røst, and Trænadjupet reefs), and the northern coral-reef areas in Norway (Korallen, Lopphavet, Stjernsundet, and Sveinsgrunnen reefs). Seven other samples were investigated for their living (stained) and dead (unstained) assemblages. Hierarchical cluster analysis allows the recognition of five benthic species groups linked to foraminiferal microhabitats from on- and off-reef environments as follows: I) shallow ‘‘off-reef’’ areas of the Oslo Fjord, II) deep-sea .1800-m water depth, and III) bathyal between 800–1800 m, and ‘‘on-reef’’ areas of IV) the Skagerrak and V) the shelf and upper continental slope of the mid- and nothern Norwegian margin. The benthic foraminiferal fauna associated with the declining coral reefs in the Oslo Fjord suggests that a low amount of labile organic matter and/or nutrients reach the sea floor making the environment unfavorable for coral growth, reconfirming the previous results on direct measurements of the organic matter. This study indicates that foraminifers can be used as a tool for the characterization of cold-water coral-reef environments.
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