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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2011-08-24
    Description: The first two years of Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy are analyzed and compared with our previously published first year results. The results are consistent, but the addition of the second year of data increases the precision and accuracy detected CMB temperature fluctuations. The 2 yr 53 GHz data are characterized by rms temperature fluctuations of (delta-T)(sub rms) (7 deg) = 44 +/- 7 micro-K and (delta-T)(sub rms) (10 deg) = 30.5 +/- 2.7 micro-K at 7 deg and 10 deg angular resolution, respectively. The 53 x 90 GHz cross-correlation amplitude at zero lag is C(0)(sup 1/2) = 36 +/- 5 micro-K (68% CL) for the unsmoothed (7 deg resolution) DMR data. We perform a likelihood analysis of the cross-correlation function, with Monte Carlo simulations to infer biases of the method, for a power-law model of initial density fluctuations, P(k) proportional to R(exp n). The Monte Carlo simulations indicate that derived estimates of n are biased by +0.11 +/- 0.01, while the subset of simulations with a low quadrupole (as observed) indicate a bias of +0.31+/- 0.04. Derived values for 68% confidence intervals are given corrected (and not corrected) for our estimated biases. Including the quadrupole anisotropy, the most likely quadrupole-normalized amplitude is Q(sub rms-PS) = 14.3(sup + 5.2 sub -3.3) micro-K (12.8(sup + 5.2 sub -3.3) micro-K0 with a spectral index n = 1.42(sup + 0.49 sub -0.55)(n = 1.53(sup + 0.49 sub -0.55). With n fixed to 1.0 the most likely amplitude is 18.2 +/- 11.5 micro-K (17.4 +/- 1.5 micro-K). The marginal likelihood of n is 1.42 +/- 0.37 (1.53 +/- 0.37). Excluding the quadrupole anisotropy, the most likely quadrupole-normalized amplitude is Q(sub rms-PS) = 17.4(sup + 7.5 sub -5.2) micro-K (15.8(sup + 7.5 sub -5.2) micro-K) with a spectral index n = 1.11(sup + 0.60 sub -0.55) (n = 1.22(sup + 0.60 sub -0.55). With n fixed to 1.0 the most likely amplitude is 18.6 +/- 1.6 micro-K (18.2 +/- 1.6 micro-K). The marginal likelihood of n is 1.11 +/- 0.40 (1.22 +/- 0.40). Our best estimate of the dipole from the 2 yr DMR data is 3.363 +/- 0.024 mK toward Galactic coordinates (l, b) = (264.4 deg +/- 0.2 deg, 48.1 deg +/- 0.4 deg), and our best estimate of the rms quadrupole amplitude in our sky is 6 +/- 3 micro-K (68% CL).
    Keywords: ASTRONOMY
    Type: Astrophysical Journal, Part 1 (ISSN 0004-637X); 436; 2; p. 423-442
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2011-08-24
    Description: We compute the three-point temperature correlation function of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) first-year sky maps to search for non-Gaussian temperature fluctuations. The level of fluctuations seen in the computed correlation function are too large to be attributable solely to instrument noise. However the fluctuations are consistent with the level expected to result from a superposition of istrument noise and sky signal arising from a Gaussian power-law model of initial fluctuations, with a quadrupole normalized amplitude of 17 micro K and a power-law spectral index n = 1. We place limits on the amplitude of intrinsic three-point correlations with a variety of predicted functional forms.
    Keywords: ASTROPHYSICS
    Type: The Astrophysical Journal, Part 1 (ISSN 0004-637X); 431; 1; p. 1-5
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2011-08-24
    Description: The COBE spacecraft was launched November 18, 1989 UT carrying three scientific instruments into earth orbit for studies of cosmology. One of these instruments, the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR), is designed to measure the large-angular-scale temperature anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation at three frequencies (31.5, 53, and 90 GHz). This paper presents three methods used to calibrate the DMR. First, the signal difference between beam-filling hot and cold targets observed on the ground provides a primary calibration that is transferred to space by noise sources internal to the instrument. Second, the moon is used in flight as an external calibration source. Third, the signal arising from the Doppler effect due to the earth's motion around the barycenter of the solar system is used as an external calibration source. Preliminary analysis of the external source calibration techniques confirms the accuracy of the currently more precise ground-based calibration. Assuming the noise source behavior did not change from the ground-based calibration to flight, a 0.1-0.4 percent relative and 0.7-2.5 percent absolute calibration uncertainty is derived, depending on radiometer channel.
    Keywords: SPACECRAFT INSTRUMENTATION
    Type: Astrophysical Journal, Part 1 (ISSN 0004-637X); 391; 2, Ju
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  • 4
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    In:  CASI
    Publication Date: 2016-03-08
    Description: An apparatus is described for phase separating a gas-liquid mixture as might exist in a subcritical cryogenic helium vessel for cooling a superconducting magnet at low gravity such as in planetary orbit, permitting conservation of the liquid and extended service life of the superconducting magnet.
    Keywords: INSTRUMENTATION AND PHOTOGRAPHY
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2017-10-02
    Description: This paper describes a superconducting magnet system which is the heart of a particle astrophysics facility to be mounted on a portion of the proposed NASA space station. This facility will complete the studies done by the electromagnetic observatories now under development and construction by NASA. The paper outlines the selection process of the type of magnet to be used to analyze the energy and momentum of charged particles from deep space. The ASTROMAG superconducting magnet must meet all the criteria for a shuttle launch and landing, and it must meet safety standards for use in or near a manned environment such as the space station. The magnet facility must have a particle gathering aperture of at least 1 square meter steradian and the facility should be capable of resolving heavy nuclei with a total energy of 10 Tev or more.
    Keywords: SPACECRAFT INSTRUMENTATION
    Type: NAS 1.15:89277 , CONF-860914-10 , DE87-002574 , NASA-TM-89277 , LBL-22343
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2016-06-07
    Description: The techniques and results of power pattern measurements of a corrugated horn antenna designed for low sidelobes are reported. The power pattern was measured to levels 90 dB below the main beam maximum in both the E- and H-planes. The measured patterns were found to be in good agreement with predictions from existing theory for the performance of corrugated scalar feeds.
    Keywords: COMMUNICATIONS AND RADAR
    Type: The Telecommun. and Data Acquisition Rept.; p 8-14
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2015-12-14
    Type: paper
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2011-08-24
    Description: The cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) spectrum measured by the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) instrument on NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) is indistinguishable from a blackbody, implying stringent limits on energy release in the early universe later than the time t = 1 yr after the big bang. We compare the FIRAS data to previous precise measurements of the cosmic microwave background spectrum and find a reasonable agreement. We discuss the implications of the absolute value of y is less than 2.5 x 10(exp -5) and the absolute value of mu is less than 3.3 x 10(exp -4) 95% confidence limits found by Mather et al. (1994) on many processes occurring after t = 1 yr, such as explosive structure formation, reionization, and dissipation of small-scale density perturbations. We place limits on models with dust plus Population III stars, or evolving populations of IR galaxies, by directly comparing the Mather et al. spectrum to the model predictions.
    Keywords: ASTROPHYSICS
    Type: The Astrophysical Journal, Part 1 (ISSN 0004-637X); 420; 2; p. 450-456
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2011-08-24
    Description: Cosmic anisotrophy produces an excess variance sq sigma(sub sky) in the Delta maps produced by the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) on cosmic background explorer (COBE) that is over and above the instrument noise. After smoothing to an effective resolution of 10 deg, this excess sigma(sub sky)(10 deg), provides an estimate for the amplitude of the primordial density perturbation power spectrum with a cosmic uncertainty of only 12%. We employ detailed Monte Carlo techniques to express the amplitude derived from this statistic in terms of the universal root mean square (rms) quadrupole amplitude, (Q sq/RMS)(exp 0.5). The effects of monopole and dipole subtraction and the non-Gaussian shape of the DMR beam cause the derived (Q sq/RMS)(exp 0.5) to be 5%-10% larger than would be derived using simplified analytic approximations. We also investigate the properties of two other map statistics: the actual quadrupole and the Boughn-Cottingham statistic. Both the sigma(sub sky)(10 deg) statistic and the Boughn-Cottingham statistic are consistent with the (Q sq/RMS)(exp 0.5) = 17 +/- 5 micro K reported by Smoot et al. (1992) and Wright et al. (1992).
    Keywords: ASTROPHYSICS
    Type: Astrophysical Journal, Part 1 (ISSN 0004-637X); 420; 1; p. 1-8
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2011-08-17
    Description: A 33-GHz airborne radiometer system has been developed to map large angular scale variations in the temperature of the 3 K cosmic background radiation. A ferrite circulator switches a room-temperature mixer between two antennas pointing 60 deg apart in the sky. In 40 min of observing, the radiometer can measure the anisotropy of the microwave background with an accuracy of plus or minus 1 mK rms, or about 1 part in 3000 of 3 K. The apparatus is flown in a U-2 jet to 20 km altitude where 33-GHz thermal microwave emission from the atmosphere is at a low level. A second radiometer, tuned to 54 GHz near oxygen emission lines, monitors spurious signals from residual atmospheric radiation. The antennas, which have an extremely low side-lobe response of less than -65 dB past 60 deg, reject anisotropic radiation from the earth's surface. Periodic interchange of the antenna positions and reversal of the aircraft's flight direction cancel equipment-based imbalances. The system has been operated successfully in U-2 aircraft flown from NASA-Ames at Moffett Field, Calif.
    Keywords: INSTRUMENTATION AND PHOTOGRAPHY
    Type: Review of Scientific Instruments; 49; Apr. 197
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