ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Keywords: cohesive sediment ; inundation ; effluent mixing ; shoaling waves ; water quality
    Description / Table of Contents: This special issue contains selected papers from the 13th International Conference on Estuarine and Coastal Modeling (ECM13), held Nov 4-6, 2013. The conference brings modelers from academic institutions, government and private industry together to present and discuss the latest developments in the field of marine environmental modeling. Begun in 1989 by Dr. Malcolm Spaulding, the conference is held every other year in a retreat-like setting with a maximum of about 125 people to encourage interaction and help strengthen ties between modeling communities. A wide range of modeling issues are encouraged, including advances in physical understanding, numerical algorithm development, model applications, and better tools. A wide range of modeling topics are encouraged as well, including storm surge, eutrophication, larval transport, search and rescue, oil spills, fisheries issues, coastal erosion and contaminated sediment transport. Many conferences also have special themes. The special theme of ECM13 was modeling related to Hurricane Sandy which in late October 2012 devastated the Caribbean and the US East Coast, including record flooding in New York City. The 22 papers presented here cover a broad spectrum of topics, including simulations of cohesive sediment, inundation, effluent mixing, shoaling waves, and water quality and with modeling applications from Alaska to New Zealand.
    Pages: Online-Ressource (VII, 424 Seiten)
    Edition: Printed Edition of the Special Issue Published in Journal of Marine Science and Engineering
    ISBN: 9783038420477
    Language: English
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2017-01-04
    Description: Author Posting. © The Author(s), 2007. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Elsevier B.V. for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Marine Systems 69 (2008): 154-161, doi:10.1016/j.jmarsys.2007.02.013.
    Description: In MREA and many other marine applications, it is common to have multiple models running with different grids, run by different institutions. Techniques and tools are described for low-bandwidth delivery of data from large multidimensional data sets, such as those from meteorological and oceanographic models, directly into generic analysis and visualization tools. Output is stored using the NetCDF CF Metadata Conventions, and then delivered to collaborators over the web via OPeNDAP. OPeNDAP datasets served by different institutions are then organized via THREDDS catalogs. Tools and procedures are then used which enable scientists to explore data on the original model grids using tools they are familiar with. It is also low-bandwidth, enabling users to extract just the data they require, an important feature for access from ship or remote areas. The entire implementation is simple enough to be handled by modelers working with their webmasters – no advanced programming support is necessary.
    Description: S. Carniel was partially supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR grant number N00014-05-1-0730). I. Janekovic was supported by the Croatian Ministry of Science, Education and Sport (grant number 0098113).
    Keywords: Data collections ; Information systems ; Modelling ; Adriatic Sea
    Repository Name: Woods Hole Open Access Server
    Type: Preprint
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2017-06-28
    Description: Author Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2008. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Geophysical Research 113 (2008): C04004, doi:10.1029/2007JC004148.
    Description: In this paper we present an application of a variational method for the reconstruction of the velocity field in a coastal flow in the central Adriatic Sea, using in situ data from surface drifters and outputs from the ROMS circulation model. The variational approach, previously developed and tested for mesoscale open ocean flows, has been improved and adapted to account for inhomogeneities on boundary current dynamics over complex bathymetry and coastline and for weak Lagrangian persistence in coastal flows. The velocity reconstruction is performed using nine drifter trajectories over 45 d, and a hierarchy of indirect tests is introduced to evaluate the results as the real ocean state is not known. For internal consistency and impact of the analysis, three diagnostics characterizing the particle prediction and transport, in terms of residence times in various zones and export rates from the boundary current toward the interior, show that the reconstruction is quite effective. A qualitative comparison with sea color data from the MODIS satellite images shows that the reconstruction significantly improves the description of the boundary current with respect to the ROMS model first guess, capturing its main features and its exchanges with the interior when sampled by the drifters.
    Description: Four of the authors are supported by the Office of Naval Research, V.T. and A.G. under grants N00014-05-1-0094 and N00014-05-1-0095, P.M.P. under grant N00014-03-1-0291, and S.C. under grant N00014-05-1-0730. CNR-ISMAR activity was partially supported by P.O.R. ‘‘CAINO’’ (Regione Puglia), VECTOR (Italian MIUR) project, and ECOOP (EU project).
    Keywords: Coastal circulation ; Flow reconstruction ; Lagrangian analysis
    Repository Name: Woods Hole Open Access Server
    Type: Article
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2016-09-22
    Description: © The Author(s), 2013. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography 103 (2014): 79–95, doi:10.1016/j.dsr2.2013.10.011.
    Description: Cysts of Alexandrium fundyense, a dinoflagellate that causes toxic algal blooms in the Gulf of Maine, spend the winter as dormant cells in the upper layer of bottom sediment or the bottom nepheloid layer and germinate in spring to initiate new blooms. Erosion measurements were made on sediment cores collected at seven stations in the Gulf of Maine in the autumn of 2011 to explore if resuspension (by waves and currents) could change the distribution of over-wintering cysts from patterns observed in the previous autumn; or if resuspension could contribute cysts to the water column during spring when cysts are viable. The mass of sediment eroded from the core surface at 0.4 Pa ranged from 0.05 kg m−2 near Grand Manan Island, to 0.35 kg m−2 in northern Wilkinson Basin. The depth of sediment eroded ranged from about 0.05 mm at a station with sandy sediment at 70 m water depth on the western Maine shelf, to about 1.2 mm in clayey–silt sediment at 250 m water depth in northern Wilkinson Basin. The sediment erodibility measurements were used in a sediment-transport model forced with modeled waves and currents for the period October 1, 2010 to May 31, 2011 to predict resuspension and bed erosion. The simulated spatial distribution and variation of bottom shear stress was controlled by the strength of the semi-diurnal tidal currents, which decrease from east to west along the Maine coast, and oscillatory wave-induced currents, which are strongest in shallow water. Simulations showed occasional sediment resuspension along the central and western Maine coast associated with storms, steady resuspension on the eastern Maine shelf and in the Bay of Fundy associated with tidal currents, no resuspension in northern Wilkinson Basin, and very small resuspension in western Jordan Basin. The sediment response in the model depended primarily on the profile of sediment erodibility, strength and time history of bottom stress, consolidation time scale, and the current in the water column. Based on analysis of wave data from offshore buoys from 1996 to 2012, the number of wave events inducing a bottom shear stress large enough to resuspend sediment at 80 m ranged from 0 to 2 in spring (April and May) and 0 to 10 in winter (October through March). Wave-induced resuspension is unlikely in water greater than about 100 m deep. The observations and model results suggest that a millimeter or so of sediment and associated cysts may be mobilized in both winter and spring, and that the frequency of resuspension will vary interannually. Depending on cyst concentration in the sediment and the vertical distribution in the water column, these events could result in a concentration in the water column of at least 104 cysts m−3. In some years, resuspension events could episodically introduce cysts into the water column in spring, where germination is likely to be facilitated at the time of bloom formation. An assessment of the quantitative effects of cyst resuspension on bloom dynamics in any particular year requires more detailed investigation.
    Description: Research support to Donald M. Anderson and Bruce A. Keafer provided through the Woods Hole Center for Oceans and Human Health; National Science Foundation Grants OCE-0430724 and OCE-0911031; and National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Grant 1-P50-ES012742-01; the ECOHAB Grant program through NOAA Grants NA06NOS4780245 and A09NOS4780193; the MERHAB Grant program through NOAA Grant NA11NOS4780025; and the PCMHAB Grant program through NOAA Grant NA11NOS4780023. Research support to all other authors was provided by U.S. Geological Survey.
    Keywords: Sediment transport ; Bottom stress ; Sediment resuspension ; Harmful algal blooms ; Gulf of Maine ; Alexandrium fundyense ; HAB
    Repository Name: Woods Hole Open Access Server
    Type: Article
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2016-09-22
    Description: © The Author(s), 2015. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in Estuaries and Coasts 39 (2016): 311-332, doi:10.1007/s12237-015-0011-y.
    Description: Numerical modeling has emerged over the last several decades as a widely accepted tool for investigations in environmental sciences. In estuarine research, hydrodynamic and ecological models have moved along parallel tracks with regard to complexity, refinement, computational power, and incorporation of uncertainty. Coupled hydrodynamic-ecological models have been used to assess ecosystem processes and interactions, simulate future scenarios, and evaluate remedial actions in response to eutrophication, habitat loss, and freshwater diversion. The need to couple hydrodynamic and ecological models to address research and management questions is clear because dynamic feedbacks between biotic and physical processes are critical interactions within ecosystems. In this review, we present historical and modern perspectives on estuarine hydrodynamic and ecological modeling, consider model limitations, and address aspects of model linkage, skill assessment, and complexity. We discuss the balance between spatial and temporal resolution and present examples using different spatiotemporal scales. Finally, we recommend future lines of inquiry, approaches to balance complexity and uncertainty, and model transparency and utility. It is idealistic to think we can pursue a “theory of everything” for estuarine models, but recent advances suggest that models for both scientific investigations and management applications will continue to improve in terms of realism, precision, and accuracy.
    Description: NKG, ALA, and RPS acknowledge support from the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program. DKR gratefully acknowledges support from NSF (OCE-1314642) and NIEHS (1P50-ES021923-01). MJB and JMPV gratefully acknowledge support from NOAA NOS NCCOS (NA05NOS4781201 and NA11NOS4780043). MJB and SJL gratefully acknowledge support from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program—Defense Coastal/Estuarine Research Program (RC-1413 and RC-2245).
    Keywords: Numerical modeling ; Hydrodynamics ; Ecological modeling ; Ecosystem modeling ; Skill assessment
    Repository Name: Woods Hole Open Access Server
    Type: Article
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2016-12-23
    Description: A series of four hydrographic cruises at three-month intervals was undertaken in Buzzards Bay in 1982-83. Buzzards Bay is located on the southern coast of Massachusetts, west of Cape Cod. Listings and vertical profiles of one-meter-averaged values of temperatures, salinity, sigma-t and light transmission are presented. Selected vertical cross-sections of temperature, salinity and sigma-t are also included, as are horizontal maps of the same variables at depths of 1 m and 8 m.
    Description: Prepared for NOAA, National Sea Grant College Program, under grant numbers NA80-AA-D-0007 (R/P-16; R/P-15) and NA83-AA-D-00049 (R/P-13) and the Coastal Research Center under a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.
    Keywords: Oceanography
    Repository Name: Woods Hole Open Access Server
    Type: Technical Report
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2018-05-20
    Description: Author Posting. © The Author(s), 2017. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Taylor & Francis for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Operational Oceanography 10 (2017): 115-126, doi:10.1080/1755876X.2017.1322026.
    Description: This paper outlines strategies that would advance coastal ocean modeling, analysis and prediction as a complement to the observing and data management activities of the coastal components of the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS®) and the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS). The views presented are the consensus of a group of U.S. based researchers with a cross-section of coastal oceanography and ocean modeling expertise and community representation drawn from Regional and U.S. Federal partners in IOOS. Priorities for research and development are suggested that would enhance the value of IOOS observations through model-based synthesis, deliver better model-based information products, and assist the design, evaluation and operation of the observing system itself. The proposed priorities are: model coupling, data assimilation, nearshore processes, cyberinfrastructure and model skill assessment, modeling for observing system design, evaluation and operation, ensemble prediction, and fast predictors. Approaches are suggested to accomplish substantial progress in a 3-8 year timeframe. In addition, the group proposes steps to promote collaboration between research and operations groups in Regional Associations, U.S. Federal Agencies, and the international ocean research community in general that would foster coordination on scientific and technical issues, and strengthen federal-academic partnerships benefiting IOOS stakeholders and end users.
    Description: 2018-05-20
    Keywords: Coastal ocean ; Modeling ; Forecasting ; Real-time ; Operational ; Data assimilation ; Cyberinfrastructure ; Skill assessment ; Model coupling ; Observing system design ; GOOS
    Repository Name: Woods Hole Open Access Server
    Type: Preprint
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
    Publication Date: 2017-01-04
    Description: The Massachusetts Bays Program made bottom pressure and water velocity observations in Massachusetts and Cape Cod Bays during 1990 and 1991. In the Bays, the sea surface elevation appeared to rise and fall in phase with equal amplitudes at each diurnal or semidiurnal tidal frequency. There is some amplification in Boston and Provincetown harbors. The semidiurnal tides (particularly the M2 constituent) dominate. Massachusetts and Cape Cod Bays are part of the Gulf of Maine/Bay of Fundy system which is resonant near the semidiurnal frequency. This resonance amplifies the importance of the semidiurnal tides so that diurnal and higher harmonic tides become negligible. The sea level tides force currents which move with the same frequencies, but whose amplitudes are affected by the bathymetry. The strongest currents exist in the channel between Race Point and Stellwagen Bank where tidal currents exceed 1 knot. Analysis of current records for their tidal signal is complicated by internal tides which contaminate the records. These internal waves at tidal frequency exist on the stratification in the water column, and disappear during winter well-mixed times. At other times they must be considered as a signifcant source of energy for mixing and resuspension of sediments.
    Keywords: Tides ; Currents ; Internal waves
    Repository Name: Woods Hole Open Access Server
    Type: Technical Report
    Format: 3845643 bytes
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2017-01-04
    Description: Author Posting. © NATO Undersea Research Centre, 2007. This article is posted here by permission of NATO Undersea Research Centre for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Marine Systems 69 (2008): 86-98, doi:10.1016/j.jmarsys.2007.02.015.
    Description: Despite numerous and regular improvements in underlying models, surface drift prediction in the ocean remains a challenging task because of our yet limited understanding of all processes involved. Hence, deterministic approaches to the problem are often limited by empirical assumptions on underlying physics. Multi-model hyper-ensemble forecasts, which exploit the power of an optimal local combination of available information including ocean, atmospheric and wave models, may show superior forecasting skills when compared to individual models because they allow for local correction and/or bias removal. In this work, we explore in greater detail the potential and limitations of the hyper-ensemble method in the Adriatic Sea, using a comprehensive surface drifter database. The performance of the hyper-ensembles and the individual models are discussed by analyzing associated uncertainties and probability distribution maps. Results suggest that the stochastic method may reduce position errors significantly for 12 to 72 h forecasts and hence compete with pure deterministic approaches.
    Description: Funded by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
    Keywords: Forecast ; Surface drift ; Multi-model super-ensembles ; Linear regression ; Ocean models ; Atmospheric models ; Wave models
    Repository Name: Woods Hole Open Access Server
    Type: Article
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2017-01-05
    Description: Author Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2007. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Geophysical Research 112 (2007): C03S18, doi:10.1029/2006JC003726.
    Description: A two-way interacting high resolution numerical simulation of the Adriatic Sea using the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) and Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS®) was conducted to improve forecast momentum and heat flux fields, and to evaluate surface flux field differences for two consecutive bora events during February 2003. (COAMPS® is a registered trademark of the Naval Research Laboratory.) The strength, mean positions and extensions of the bora jets, and the atmospheric conditions driving them varied considerably between the two events. Bora 1 had 62% stronger heat flux and 51% larger momentum flux than bora 2. The latter displayed much greater diurnal variability characterized by inertial oscillations and the early morning strengthening of a west Adriatic barrier jet, beneath which a stronger west Adriatic ocean current developed. Elsewhere, surface ocean current differences between the two events were directly related to differences in wind stress curl generated by the position and strength of the individual bora jets. The mean heat flux bias was reduced by 72%, and heat flux RMSE reduced by 30% on average at four instrumented over-water sites in the two-way coupled simulation relative to the uncoupled control. Largest reductions in wind stress were found in the bora jets, while the biggest reductions in heat flux were found along the north and west coasts of the Adriatic. In bora 2, SST gradients impacted the wind stress curl along the north and west coasts, and in bora 1 wind stress curl was sensitive to the Istrian front position and strength. The two-way coupled simulation produced diminished surface current speeds of ∼12% over the northern Adriatic during both bora compared with a one-way coupled simulation.
    Description: The research support for J. Pullen, J. D. Doyle, and T. Haack was provided by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) program elements 0602435N and 0601153N.
    Keywords: Air-sea interaction ; Coupled modeling ; Adriatic Sea
    Repository Name: Woods Hole Open Access Server
    Type: Article
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...