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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-08-10
    Description: Abstract An integrated system, based on Inductively Coupled Plasma-Sector Field Mass Spectrometry (ICP-SFMS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrophotometry (ICP-AES) techniques, was optimised for the geochemical characterisation of soils and marine sediments. Sample mineralization was carried out with HF, HNO3 and HClO4. Operative blanks were at least two orders of magnitude lower than the lowest concentration measured in real samples. For ICP-SFMS, the detection power of the method in high resolution mode was sufficient for an accurate quantification of metals, yet avoiding REEs' (Rare Earth Elements) isobaric interferences. Once tested the accuracy on six certified materials, the methods were applied to the analysis of 39 major and trace metals on the top 90 m of sediments from the ANDRILL AND-1B core, covering the last million years. Stratigraphies of REEs and of normalised markers from this core clearly highlight a discontinuity at about 660,000 years before present. This pattern is well shown by the results of a PMF (Positive Matrix Factorization) statistical analysis, revealing two different sources for the sedimentary material, whose relative contribution changed around that time. Such a result is consistent with previous studies and confirms the net change in the provenance of glacial fluxes in the McMurdo region (Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica) in the last million years.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2016-11-14
    Description: Assessments of climate sensitivity to projected greenhouse gas concentrations underpin environmental policy decisions, with such assessments often based on model simulations of climate during recent centuries and millennia1, 2, 3. These simulations depend critically on accurate records of past aerosol forcing from global-scale volcanic eruptions, reconstructed from measurements of sulphate deposition in ice cores4, 5, 6. Non-uniform transport and deposition of volcanic fallout mean that multiple records from a wide array of ice cores must be combined to create accurate reconstructions. Here we re-evaluated the record of volcanic sulphate deposition using a much more extensive array of Antarctic ice cores. In our new reconstruction, many additional records have been added and dating of previously published records corrected through precise synchronization to the annually dated West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide ice core7, improving and extending the record throughout the Common Era. Whereas agreement with existing reconstructions is excellent after 1500, we found a substantially different history of volcanic aerosol deposition before 1500; for example, global aerosol forcing values from some of the largest eruptions (for example, 1257 and 1458) previously were overestimated by 20–30% and others underestimated by 20–50%.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2018-08-10
    Description: An integrated system Inductively Coupled Plasma - Sector Field Mass Spectrometry (ICP-SFMS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma – Atomic Emission Spectrophotometry (ICP – AES) has been applied to quantify 39 major and trace elements (including Rare Earths Elements -REE) in Antarctic glaciomarine sediments collected in the framework of ANDRILL. This project aims to study the role of the Antarctic Continent within the global climatic system, by the recovery and analysis of two deep sediment cores (AND-1B, MIS and AND-2A, SMS), drilled close to the margin of the Ross Ice Shelf. The main goals of ANDRILL were to obtain a stratigraphic record that documents key steps in Antarctica’s Cenozoic climatic and glacial history, and in the tectonic evolution of the Transantarctic Mountains and the West Antarctic rift System. In particular, the study of the geochemical composition of sediments along the two ANDRILL cores can provide information about the possible source of terrigenous material deposited over the drilling site (Harwood et al., 2006). Preliminary results with a spatial resolution of about 1 m for the geochemical composition of the interval 24.66- 85.24 m of depth of marine sediments from AND-1B core covering about the last 1 Ma, are here shown. The concentration ratio of each measured element with respect to Al concentration, used as terrigenous reference, was calculated in order to remove the possible effect on elemental concentrations of differences in average sediment grain-size along the core and possible dilution effects and point out specified metal enrichments. The presented data and depth profiles (e.g. Fe/Al, Mn/Al, Co/Al, Cr/Al, Eu/Al and Europium anomaly) relative to sediments deposited during the last Ma at the MIS site, show an evident discontinuity from samples collected above and below 58.4 m of depth, corresponding to about 0.45 Ma BP, following the latest AND-1B dating model (85.24 m of depth corresponding to about 0.988 Ma; the chronological datum of the sediments is developed from 40Ar/39Ar ages volcanic deposits, Naish et al. 2009). This difference of geochemical composition suggests different rock sources for the material deposited before and after about 0.45 Ma BP. In particular the geochemical composition of the upper sediments is similar to the one of McMurdo Volcanic Group (MVG) whereas the lower sediments are close to the compositions of samples collected in the Transantarctic Mountain (TAM). Such a different composition could be linked to the climatic discontinuity known as Mid-Brunhes Event (MBE), dated 430 Kyr BP, which marks the boundary between two different global climatic conditions, with the youngest part characterized by a larger temperature gap between short and warm interglacials and long and cold glacials, with respect to the oldest part.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2017-07-21
    Description: Reproducible climate reconstructions of the Common Era (1 CE to present) are key to placing industrial-era warming into the context of natural climatic variability. Here we present a community-sourced database of temperature-sensitive proxy records from the PAGES2k initiative. The database gathers 692 records from 648 locations, including all continental regions and major ocean basins. The records are from trees, ice, sediment, corals, speleothems, documentary evidence, and other archives. They range in length from 50 to 2000 years, with a median of 547 years, while temporal resolution ranges from biweekly to centennial. Nearly half of the proxy time series are significantly correlated with HadCRUT4.2 surface temperature over the period 1850–2014. Global temperature composites show a remarkable degree of coherence between high- and low-resolution archives, with broadly similar patterns across archive types, terrestrial versus marine locations, and screening criteria. The database is suited to investigations of global and regional temperature variability over the Common Era, and is shared in the Linked Paleo Data (LiPD) format, including serializations in Matlab, R and Python.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2019-07-17
    Description: Using high resolution chemical impurity and dielectric profiling data annual layers have been counted on the EPICA ice core from Dronning Maud Land (EDML), Antarctica spanning the past 16700 years. The methodology used for counting Greenland ice cores and creating the Greenland Ice Core Chronology 2005 (GICC05) [Rasmussen et al., 2006] has also been implemented for the EDML counting. The estimated maximum counting error for the EDML counting is approx. 5%, but a preliminary volcanic matching with Greenland ice core records suggest differences of 1% or less during the Holocene between the EDML counting and GICC05. A comparison of cosmogenic isotope records from EDML and Greenland also suggests differences of less than 1% between the two annual layer counted chronologies. Reference: Rasmussen, S.O., Andersen, K.K., Svensson, A., Steffensen, J.P., Vinther, B.M., Clausen, H.B., Andersen, M.L.S., Johnsen, S.J., Larsen, L.B., Dahl-Jensen, D., Bigler, M., Röthlisberger R., Fischer H., Goto-Azuma K., Hansson M.E., Ruth U, A new Greenland ice core chronology for the last glacial termination, Journal of Geophysical Research Vol. 111, D06102, doi:10.1029/2005JD006079. 2006.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2019-07-17
    Description: Past global climate changes had strong regional expression. To elucidate their spatio-temporal pattern, we reconstructed past temperatures for seven continental-scale regions during the past one to two millennia. The most coherent feature in nearly all of the regional temperature reconstructions is a long-term cooling trend, which ended late in the nineteenth century. At multi-decadal to centennial scales, temperature variability shows distinctly different regional patterns, with more similarity within each hemisphere than between them. There were no globally synchronous multi-decadal warm or cold intervals that define a worldwide Medieval Warm Period or Little Ice Age, but all reconstructions show generally cold conditions between ad 1580 and 1880, punctuated in some regions by warm decades during the eighteenth century. The transition to these colder conditions occurred earlier in the Arctic, Europe and Asia than in North America or the Southern Hemisphere regions. Recent warming reversed the long-term cooling; during the period ad 1971–2000, the area-weighted average reconstructed temperature was higher than any other time in nearly 1,400 years.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2019-08-19
    Description: Abstract of Bazin et al. (2013): An accurate and coherent chronological framework is essential for the interpretation of climatic and environmental records obtained from deep polar ice cores. Until now, one common ice core age scale had been developed based on an inverse dating method (Datice), combining glaciological modelling with absolute and stratigraphic markers between 4 ice cores covering the last 50 ka (thousands of years before present) (Lemieux-Dudon et al., 2010). In this paper, together with the companion paper of Veres et al. (2013), we present an extension of this work back to 800 ka for the NGRIP, TALDICE, EDML, Vostok and EDC ice cores using an improved version of the Datice tool. The AICC2012 (Antarctic Ice Core Chronology 2012) chronology includes numerous new gas and ice stratigraphic links as well as improved evaluation of background and associated variance scenarios. This paper concentrates on the long timescales between 120-800 ka. In this framework, new measurements of d18Oatm over Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11-12 on EDC and a complete d18Oatm record of the TALDICE ice cores permit us to derive additional orbital gas age constraints. The coherency of the different orbitally deduced ages (from d18Oatm, dO2/N2 and air content) has been verified before implementation in AICC2012. The new chronology is now independent of other archives and shows only small differences, most of the time within the original uncertainty range calculated by Datice, when compared with the previous ice core reference age scale EDC3, the Dome F chronology, or using a comparison between speleothems and methane. For instance, the largest deviation between AICC2012 and EDC3 (5.4 ka) is obtained around MIS 12. Despite significant modifications of the chronological constraints around MIS 5, now independent of speleothem records in AICC2012, the date of Termination II is very close to the EDC3 one. Abstract of Veres et al. (2013): The deep polar ice cores provide reference records commonly employed in global correlation of past climate events. However, temporal divergences reaching up to several thousand years (ka) exist between ice cores over the last climatic cycle. In this context, we are hereby introducing the Antarctic Ice Core Chronology 2012 (AICC2012), a new and coherent timescale developed for four Antarctic ice cores, namely Vostok, EPICA Dome C (EDC), EPICA Dronning Maud Land (EDML) and Talos Dome (TALDICE), alongside the Greenlandic NGRIP record. The AICC2012 timescale has been constructed using the Bayesian tool Datice (Lemieux-Dudon et al., 2010) that combines glaciological inputs and data constraints, including a wide range of relative and absolute gas and ice stratigraphic markers. We focus here on the last 120 ka, whereas the companion paper by Bazin et al. (2013) focuses on the interval 120-800 ka. Compared to previous timescales, AICC2012 presents an improved timing for the last glacial inception, respecting the glaciological constraints of all analyzed records. Moreover, with the addition of numerous new stratigraphic markers and improved calculation of the lock-in depth (LID) based on d15N data employed as the Datice background scenario, the AICC2012 presents a slightly improved timing for the bipolar sequence of events over Marine Isotope Stage 3 associated with the seesaw mechanism, with maximum differences of about 600 yr with respect to the previous Datice-derived chronology of Lemieux-Dudon et al. (2010), hereafter denoted LD2010. Our improved scenario confirms the regional differences for the millennial scale variability over the last glacial period: while the EDC isotopic record (events of triangular shape) displays peaks roughly at the same time as the NGRIP abrupt isotopic increases, the EDML isotopic record (events characterized by broader peaks or even extended periods of high isotope values) reached the isotopic maximum several centuries before. It is expected that the future contribution of both other long ice core records and other types of chronological constraints to the Datice tool will lead to further refinements in the ice core chronologies beyond the AICC2012 chronology. For the time being however, we recommend that AICC2012 be used as the preferred chronology for the Vostok, EDC, EDML and TALDICE ice core records, both over the last glacial cycle (this study), and beyond (following Bazin et al., 2013). The ages for NGRIP in AICC2012 are virtually identical to those of GICC05 for the last 60.2 ka, whereas the ages beyond are independent of those in GICC05modelext (as in the construction of AICC2012, the GICC05modelext was included only via the background scenarios and not as age markers). As such, where issues of phasing between Antarctic records included in AICC2012 and NGRIP are involved, the NGRIP ages in AICC2012 should therefore be taken to avoid introducing false offsets. However for issues involving only Greenland ice cores, there is not yet a strong basis to recommend superseding GICC05modelext as the recommended age scale for Greenland ice cores.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/zip, 16 datasets
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2019-09-23
    Description: Assessments of climate sensitivity to projected greenhouse gas concentrations underpin environmental policy decisions, with such assessments often based on model simulations of climate during recent centuries and millennia1, 2, 3. These simulations depend critically on accurate records of past aerosol forcing from global-scale volcanic eruptions, reconstructed from measurements of sulphate deposition in ice cores4, 5, 6. Non-uniform transport and deposition of volcanic fallout mean that multiple records from a wide array of ice cores must be combined to create accurate reconstructions. Here we re-evaluated the record of volcanic sulphate deposition using a much more extensive array of Antarctic ice cores. In our new reconstruction, many additional records have been added and dating of previously published records corrected through precise synchronization to the annually dated West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide ice core7, improving and extending the record throughout the Common Era. Whereas agreement with existing reconstructions is excellent after 1500, we found a substantially different history of volcanic aerosol deposition before 1500; for example, global aerosol forcing values from some of the largest eruptions (for example, 1257 and 1458) previously were overestimated by 20–30% and others underestimated by 20–50%.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
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  • 9
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