ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2014-04-15
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Inbook , NonPeerReviewed
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2016-09-03
    Description: We present the results of the short-term constancy monitoring of candidate Gaia Spectrophotometric Standard Stars (SPSS). We obtained time series of typically 1.24 h – with sampling periods from 1–3 min to a few hours, depending on the case – to monitor the constancy of our candidate SPSS down to 10 mmag, as required for the calibration of Gaia photometric data. We monitored 162 out of a total of 212 SPSS candidates. The observing campaign started in 2006 and finished in 2015, using 143 observing nights on nine different instruments covering both hemispheres. Using differential photometry techniques, we built light curves with a typical precision of 4 mmag, depending on the data quality. As a result of our constancy assessment, 150 SPSS candidates were validated against short-term variability, and only 12 were rejected because of variability including some widely used flux standards such as BD+174708, SA 105–448, 1740346, and HD 37725.
    Print ISSN: 0035-8711
    Electronic ISSN: 1365-2966
    Topics: Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 1955-01-01
    Print ISSN: 0028-1042
    Electronic ISSN: 1432-1904
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Natural Sciences in General
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2019
    Description: We have developed a method for evaluating the fidelity of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrieval algorithms by mimicking atmospheric extinction and radiance measurements in a laboratory experiment. This enables radiometric retrievals that use the same sampling volumes, relative humidities, and particle size ranges as observed by other in situ instrumentation in the experiment. We use three Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift (CAPS) monitors for extinction and University of Maryland Baltimore County’s (UMBC) three-wavelength Polarized Imaging Nephelometer (PI-Neph) for angular scattering measurements. We subsample the PI-Neph radiance measurements to angles that correspond to AERONET almucantar scans, with simulated solar zenith angles ranging from 50 ∘ to 77 ∘ . These measurements are then used as input to the Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties (GRASP) algorithm, which retrieves size distributions, complex refractive indices, single-scatter albedos, and bistatic LiDAR ratios for the in situ samples. We obtained retrievals with residuals less than 8% for about 90 samples. Samples were alternately dried or humidified, and size distributions were limited to diameters of less than 1.0 or 2.5 μ m by using a cyclone. The single-scatter albedo at 532 nm for these samples ranged from 0.59 to 1.00 when computed with CAPS extinction and Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) absorption measurements. The GRASP retrieval provided single-scatter albedos that are highly correlated with the in situ single-scatter albedos, and the correlation coefficients ranged from 0.916 to 0.976, depending upon the simulated solar zenith angle. The GRASP single-scatter albedos exhibited an average absolute bias of +0.023–0.026 with respect to the extinction and absorption measurements for the entire dataset. We also compared the GRASP size distributions to aerodynamic particle size measurements, using densities and aerodynamic shape factors that produce extinctions consistent with our CAPS measurements. The GRASP effective radii are highly correlated (R = 0.80) and biased under the corrected aerodynamic effective radii by 1.3% (for a simulated solar zenith angle of θ ∘ = 50 ∘ ); the effective variance indicated a correlation of R = 0.51 and a relative bias of 280%. Finally, our apparatus was not capable of measuring backscatter LiDAR ratios, so we measured bistatic LiDAR ratios at a scattering angle of 173 degrees. The GRASP bistatic LiDAR ratios had correlations of 0.71 to 0.86 (depending upon simulated θ ∘ ) with respect to in situ measurements, positive relative biases of 2–10%, and average absolute biases of 1.8–7.9 sr.
    Electronic ISSN: 2072-4292
    Topics: Architecture, Civil Engineering, Surveying , Geography
    Published by MDPI
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2012-09-26
    Description: Two widely tested empirical patterns in ecology are combined here to predict how the variation of population density relates to the average body size of organisms. Taylor’s law (TL) asserts that the variance of the population density of a set of populations is a power-law function of the mean population...
    Print ISSN: 0027-8424
    Electronic ISSN: 1091-6490
    Topics: Biology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2012-04-28
    Description: Urbanization is accelerating across the globe, elevating the importance of studying urban ecology. Urban environments exhibit several factors affecting plant growth and function, including high temperatures (particularly at night), CO 2 concentrations and atmospheric nitrogen deposition. We investigated the effects of urban environments on growth in Quercus rubra L. seedlings. We grew seedlings from acorns for one season at four sites along an urban–rural transect from Central Park in New York City to the Catskill Mountains in upstate New York (difference in average maximum temperatures of 2.4 °C; difference in minimum temperatures of 4.6 °C). In addition, we grew Q. rubra seedlings in growth cabinets (GCs) mimicking the seasonal differential between the city and rural sites (based on a 5-year average). In the field experiment, we found an eightfold increase in biomass in urban-grown seedlings relative to those grown at rural sites. This difference was primarily related to changes in growth allocation. Urban-grown seedlings and seedlings grown at urban temperatures in the GCs exhibited a lower root: shoot ratio (urban ~0.8, rural/remote ~1.5), reducing below-ground carbon costs associated with construction and maintenance. These urban seedlings instead allocated more growth to leaves than did rural-grown seedlings, resulting in 10-fold greater photosynthetic area but no difference in photosynthetic capacity of foliage per unit area. Seedlings grown at urban temperatures in both the field and GC experiments had higher leaf nitrogen concentrations per unit area than those grown at cooler temperatures (increases of 23% in field, 32% in GC). Lastly, we measured threefold greater 13 C enrichment of respired CO 2 (relative to substrate) in urban-grown leaves than at other sites, which may suggest greater allocation of respiratory function to growth over maintenance. It also shows that lack of differences in total R flux in response to environmental conditions may mask dramatic shifts in respiratory functioning. Overall, our findings indicating greater seedling growth and establishment at a critical regeneration phase of forest development may have important implications for the ecology of urban forests as well as the predicted growth of the terrestrial biosphere in temperate regions in response to climate change.
    Print ISSN: 0829-318X
    Electronic ISSN: 1758-4469
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2012-09-14
    Description: Oak forests dominate much of the eastern USA, but their future is uncertain due to a number of threats and widespread failure of oak regeneration. A sudden loss of oaks ( Quercus spp . ) could be accompanied by major changes in forest nitrogen (N) cycles with important implications for plant nutrient uptake and tree species composition. In this study, we measured the changes in N use and growth rates of black birch trees ( Betula lenta L.) following oak girdling at the Black Rock Forest in southeastern New York, USA. Data were collected from nine experimental plots composed of three treatments: 100% oaks girdled (OG), 50% oaks girdled (O50) and control (C). Foliar N concentration and foliar 15 N abundance increased significantly in the oak-girdled plots relative to the control, indicating that the loss of oaks significantly altered N cycling dynamics. As mineralization and nitrification rates increase following oak loss, black birch trees increase N absorption as indicated by higher foliar N content and increased growth rates. Foliar N concentration increased by 15.5% in the O50 and 30.6% in the OG plots relative to the control, while O50 and OG plots were enriched in 15 N by 1.08 and 3.33, respectively ( P 〈 0.0001). A 641% increase in black birch growth rates in OG plots suggests that this species is able to respond to additional N availability and/or increased light availability. The loss of oaks and subsequent increase in black birch productivity may have a lasting impact on ecosystem form and function.
    Print ISSN: 0829-318X
    Electronic ISSN: 1758-4469
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2015-05-31
    Description: With the use of a detailed Milky Way non-axisymmetric potential, observationally and dynamically constrained, the effects of the bar and the spiral arms in the Galaxy are studied in the disc and in the stellar halo. Especially the trapping of stars in the disc and Galactic halo by resonances on the Galactic plane, induced by the Galactic bar, has been analysed in detail. To this purpose, a new method is presented to delineate the trapping regions using empirical diagrams of some orbital properties obtained in the Galactic potential. In these diagrams, we plot in the inertial Galactic frame a characteristic orbital energy versus a characteristic orbital angular momentum, or versus the orbital Jacobi constant in the reference frame of the bar, when this is the only non-axisymmetric component in the Galactic potential. With these diagrams, some trapping regions are obtained in the disc and halo using a sample of disc stars and halo stars in the solar neighbourhood. We compute several families of periodic orbits on the Galactic plane, some associated with this resonant trapping. In particular, we find that the trapping effect of these resonances on the Galactic plane can extend several kpc from this plane, trapping stars in the Galactic halo. The purpose of our analysis is to investigate if the trapping regions contain some known moving groups in our Galaxy. We have applied our method to the Kapteyn group, a moving group in the halo, and we have found that this group appears not to be associated with a particular resonance on the Galactic plane.
    Print ISSN: 0035-8711
    Electronic ISSN: 1365-2966
    Topics: Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2015-06-12
    Description: With the use of a detailed Milky Way non-axisymmetric potential, observationally and dynamically constrained, the effects of the bar and the spiral arms in the Galaxy are studied in the disc and in the stellar halo. Especially the trapping of stars in the disc and Galactic halo by resonances on the Galactic plane, induced by the Galactic bar, has been analysed in detail. To this purpose, a new method is presented to delineate the trapping regions using empirical diagrams of some orbital properties obtained in the Galactic potential. In these diagrams, we plot in the inertial Galactic frame a characteristic orbital energy versus a characteristic orbital angular momentum, or versus the orbital Jacobi constant in the reference frame of the bar, when this is the only non-axisymmetric component in the Galactic potential. With these diagrams, some trapping regions are obtained in the disc and halo using a sample of disc stars and halo stars in the solar neighbourhood. We compute several families of periodic orbits on the Galactic plane, some associated with this resonant trapping. In particular, we find that the trapping effect of these resonances on the Galactic plane can extend several kpc from this plane, trapping stars in the Galactic halo. The purpose of our analysis is to investigate if the trapping regions contain some known moving groups in our Galaxy. We have applied our method to the Kapteyn group, a moving group in the halo, and we have found that this group appears not to be associated with a particular resonance on the Galactic plane.
    Print ISSN: 0035-8711
    Electronic ISSN: 1365-2966
    Topics: Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 1972-01-01
    Print ISSN: 1436-8730
    Electronic ISSN: 1522-2624
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition
    Published by Wiley
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...