ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Collection
Language
  • 1
    Call number: SR 90.0016(241)
    In: Mitteilungen aus dem Geologischen Institut der Eidgenössischen Technischen Hochschule und der Universität Zürich. N.F.
    Type of Medium: Series available for loan
    Pages: 106 S.
    Series Statement: Mitteilungen aus dem Geologischen Institut der Eidgenössischen Technischen Hochschule und der Universität Zürich N.F., 241
    Language: English
    Location: Lower compact magazine
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Call number: SR 99.0038(64)
    In: Deutsche Geodätische Kommission bei der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften
    Type of Medium: Series available for loan
    Pages: 88 S.
    Series Statement: Deutsche Geodätische Kommission bei der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften : Reihe C, Dissertationen 64
    Language: German
    Location: Lower compact magazine
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Monograph available for loan
    Monograph available for loan
    London : Chapman & Hall
    Call number: 7690
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: XIV, 353 S. : Ill., graph. Darst.
    Edition: Reissued
    Uniform Title: Kristallplastizität mit besonderer Berücksichtigung der Metalle
    Language: English
    Location: Upper compact magazine
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Call number: PIK N 076-95-0296
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: 157
    Branch Library: PIK Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Call number: AWI G2-13-0139 ; PIK N 076-13-0199 ; IASS 14.0011
    Description / Table of Contents: Inhaltsverzeichnis: Mitarbeiter des Beirats. - Danksagung. - Kästen. - Tabellen. - Abbildungen. - Akronyme. - Zusammenfassung. - Einleitung. - 1 Die Meere im Anthropozän. - 1.1 Nutzung der Meere. - 1.2 Die Bedrohung der Meere. - 1.3 Mögliche neue Nutzungen. - 1.4 Die Zukunft des Ökosystems Meer gestalten. - 2 Weltgesellschaft und Gesellschaftsvertrag. - 2.1 Weltgesellschaft und Weltmeere. - 2.2 Ein Gesellschaftsvertrag für die Meere. - 3 Governance anthropogener Meeresnutzung. - 3.1 Spezifika der Meere. - 3.2 Völkerrechtlicher Rahmen der Meeres-Governance: UNCLOS. - 3.3 Globale Meeres-Governance: UN-Institutionen und Aktivitäten. - 3.4 Regionale Governance der Meere. - 3.5 Private Governance der Meere. - 3.6 Ausgewählte Instrumente. - 3.7 Folgerungen. - 4 Nahrung aus dem Meer. - 4.1 Marine Fischerei. - 4.2 Aquakultur. - 4.3 Wechselwirkungen zwischen Fischerei und Aquakultur. - 4.4 Systemische Wirkungen: Land/Meer-Interaktionen und Rückkopplungen mit dem Erdsystem. - 4.5 Folgerungen. - 5 Energie aus dem Meer. - 5.1 Fossile Energieträger aus dem Meer. - 5.2Erneuerbare Energien. - 5.3 Vision für ein marines Energiesystem der Zukunft. - 5.4 Governance. - 5.5 Folgerungen. - 6 Synthese: Die blaue Revolution. - 6.1 Die Meere als gemeinsames Erbe der Menschheit. - 6.2 Expansion in die Meere. - 6.3 Eine neue Initiative für den Schutz und die nachhaltige Nutzung der Meere. - 6.4 Elemente einer neuen Meerespolitik. - 7 Handlungsempfehlungen. - 7.1 Handlungsleitende Prinzipien einer künftigen Meeres-Governance. - 7.2 Die WBGU-Vision einer umfassenden Reform des internationalen Seerechts. - 7.3 Handlungsempfehlungen: Der Weg zu einer umfassenden Seerechtsreform. - 7.4 Nahrung aus dem Meer. - 7.5 Energienutzung aus dem Meer für die Energiesystemtransformation. - 8 Empfehlungen für Forschung und Bildung. - 8.1 Forschung im Kontext der Transformation zur Nachhaltigkeit. - 8.2 Transformationsforschung für die Meere. - 8.3 Transformative Forschung für die Meere. - 8.4 Empfehlungen zur Forschungspolitik. - 9 Literatur. - 10 Glossar.
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: XXIV, 383 S. : Ill., graph. Darst., Kt.
    Edition: 1. Aufl., Red.-Schluss: 28.02.2013
    ISBN: 9783936191394
    Series Statement: Welt im Wandel : Hauptgutachten
    Branch Library: AWI Library
    Branch Library: PIK Library
    Branch Library: IASS Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Call number: AWI G2-14-0008
    Description / Table of Contents: Contents: Council Staff . - Acknowledgments. - Boxes. - Tables. - Figures. - Acronyms and Abbreviations. - Summary. - Introduction. - 1 The Oceans in the Anthropocene. - 1.1 Use of the oceans. - 1.1.1 The legendary sea and its cultural meanings. - 1.1.2 Food from the sea. - 1.1.3 Ocean shipping and maritime trade. - 1.1.4 The sea as a dump for waste and waste water. - 1.1.5 Energy from the sea. - 1.1.6 Marine mining and resource extraction. - 1.1.7 The economic value of marine ecosystems. - 1.2 Threats to the oceans. - 1.2.1 Physical destruction of ecosystems. - 1.2.2 Overfishing. - 1.2.3 Impacts of marine pollution. - 1.2.3.1 Results of chemical pollution. - 1.2.3.2 Results of plastic pollution. - 1.2.3.3 Radioactive contamination. - 1.2.4 Warming. - 1.2.5 CO2 input and acidification. - 1.2.6 Low-oxygen zones. - 1.2.7 Sea-level rise. - 1.2.8 Aggregated effects. - 1.3 Possible new uses. - 1.3.1 Renewable energy. - 1.3.2 Raw materials. - 1.3.3 Marine genetic resources. - 1.3.4 New developments in marine aquaculture. - 1.4 Shaping the future of the marine ecosystem. - 1.4.1 Primary principles and values. - 1.4.2 Guiding principle for human interaction with the oceans. - 1.4.2.1 Think systemically: Regard and maintain the sea as an ecosystem and aspart of the Earth system. - 1.4.2.2 Act in a precautionary way: Take uncertainty and ignorance into account. - 1.4.2.3 Cooperate: overcoming the tragedy of the commons. - 1.4.3 Exemplary specification of the guiding principle for the sustainable stewardship of the marine ecosystem. - 2 Global Society and Social Contract. - 2.1 Global society and world's oceans. - 2.1.1 The global society in the Anthropocene. - 2.1.2 The emerging global society and global society theory. - 2.1.3 The cosmopolitan challenge. - 2.1.4 Global appreciation of the oceans. - 2.2 A social contract for the seas. - 2.2.1 A social contract as a basis for the Great Transformation. - 2.2.2 Reform of ocean governance. - 3 Governance of Human Ocean Use. - 3.1 Specifics of the seas. - 3.1.1 Oceans as part of the Earth system. - 3.1.2 Demands on marine policy caused by knowledge gaps. - 3.1.3 Oceans as a global public and common good. - 3.1.4 Touchstones for assessing the existing governanceof the oceans. - 3.1.5 Common heritage of mankind. - 3.2 Ocean governance in international law: UNCLOS. - 3.2.1 Zoning of the oceans by UNCLOS. - 3.2.1.1 Territorial sea. - 3.2.1.2 Contiguous zone. - 3.2.1.3 Exclusive economic zone. - 3.2.1.4 Continental shelf. - 3.2.1.5 High seas. - 3.2.1.6 The Area. - 3.2.2 Regulations of UNCLOS on the conservation and sustainable use of the oceans. - 3.2.3 Institutions of UNCLOS. - 3.2.3.1 International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea. - 3.2.3.2 International Seabed Authority and the seabed regime. - 3.2.4 Assessment of UNCLOS. - 3.2.4.1 Systemic perspective. - 3.2.4.2 Precautionary principle. - 3.2.4.3 Adaptive management. - 3.2.4.4 Incentives for innovation. - 3.2.4.5 Assignment of rights of use. - 3.2.4.6 Cooperation. - 3.2.4.7 Subsidiary decision-making structures. - 3.2.4.8 Transparent information. - 3.2.4.9 Participative decision-making structures. - 3.2.4.10 Fair distribution mechanisms. - 3.2.4.11 Conflict-resolution mechanisms. - 3.2.4.12 Enforcement mechanisms. - 3.2.5 Core problems and challenges of future ocean governance. - 3.3 Global ocean governance: UN institutions and activities. - 3.3.1 Actors: UN bodies and specialized organizations. - 3.3.1.1 UN General Assembly and UNSecretary-General. - 23.3.1.2 Rio Process. - 3.3.1.3 International Maritime Organization. - 3.3.1.4 UNESCO Intergovernmental Oceanic Commission. - 3.3.1.5 UN Environmental Programme (UNEP). - 3.3.1.6 UN-Oceans. - 3.3.1.7 Global Environment Facility (GEF). - 3.3.1.8 World Bank Group. - 3.3.2 UN conventions relating to the oceans. - 3.3.2.1 Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). - 3.3.2.2 Negotiations on a new implementing agreement on marine biodiversityon the high seas. - 3.3.2.3 UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). - 3.3.2.4 UNESCO World Heritage Convention and World Heritage Marine Programme. - 3.3.2.5 MARPOL and SOLAS. - 3.3.2.6 London Convention and London Protocol. - 3.4 Regional ocean governance. - 3.4.1 UNEP Regional Seas Programme. - 3.4.2 Regional seas agreements. - 3.4.2.1 Task areas. - 3.4.2.2 Institutionalization: governance mechanisms and capacity. - 3.4.2.3 Cooperation, coordination, coherence and complementarity. - 3.4.3 EU marine policy. - 3.5 Private ocean governance. - 3.5.1 Options and limitations. - 3.5.2 Example: eco-labels and sustainability labels. - 3.6 Selected instruments. - 3.6.1 Environmental monitoring. - 3.6.2 Marine protected areas and marine spatial planning. - 3.6.2.1 Marine protected areas. - 3.6.2.2 Marine spatial planning. - 3.6.3 Integrated coastal-zone management.. - 3.6.4 Environmental standards. - 3.6.5 Environmental liability. - 3.6.6 Sanctions. - 3.6.7 Class actions. - 3.6.8 International financial transfers. - 3.7 Conclusions. - 4 Food from the Sea. - 4.1 Marine fishery. - 4.1.1 Status and trends of fisheries. - 4.1.2 Importance and effects of fisheries. - 4.1.2.1 Food and food security. - 4.1.2.2 Socioeconomic significance and effects. - 4.1.2.3 Ecological significance and effects. - 4.1.2.4 Small-scale marine fisheries in the global context. - 4.1.3 Sustainable fisheries management: methods and instruments. - 4.1.3.1 Ecosystem approach and precautionary principle as the basis for sustainable fishing. - 4.1.3.2 Knowledge-based fisheries management. - 4.1.3.3 Instruments for the sustainable management of fish-stocks. - 4.1.3.4 Minimizing the ecological risks and side effects of fisheries. - 4.1.3.5 Monitoring and enforcement. - 4.1.3.6 Costs and financing the transition towards sustainable fisheries. - 4.1.4 International fisheries governance: institutions and focal points. - 4.1.4.1 Political objectives. - 4.1.4.2 The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. - 4.1.4.3 The FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries. - 4.1.4.4 Fisheries governance on the high seas: the UN Fish Stocks Agreement and regional fisheries management organizations. - 4.1.4.5 Illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing. - 4.1.4.6 The external dimension of the EU Common Fisheries Policy. - 4.1.4.7 Subsidies in the fishing industry. - 4.1.4.8 International trade and trade policy. - 4.2 Aquaculture. - 4.2.1 Definitions and principles. - 4.2.2 State of aquaculture and trends. - 4.2.2.1 Growth and regional overview. - 4.2.2.2 Contribution to food security and poverty reduction. - 4.2.2.3 Environmental risks from aquaculture and conflicts over use at the coasts. - 4.2.2.4 Promoting ecologically sustainable aquaculture. - 4.2.3 Governance of aquaculture. - 4.2.3.1 Fundamental prerequisites for a sustainable form of aquaculture. - 4.2.3.2 Selected instruments for promoting sustainable aquaculture. - 4.2.3.3 Research and development for sustainable aquaculture. - 4.2.4 International and regional governance in aquaculture. - 4.2.4.1 International level. - 4.2.4.2 European Union. - 4.2.4.3 Regional seas agreements. - 4.3 Interactions between fisheries and aquaculture. - 4.3.1 Forage fisheries and breeding from wild-caught fish. - 4.3.2 Competition between uses. - 4.3.3 Reducing the proportion of fishmeal and fish oil used in aquaculture feeds. - 4.4 Systemic effects: land/sea interactions and feedbackloops with the Earth system. - 4.4.1 Climate change. - 4.4.2 Acidification. - 4.4.3 Low-oxygen zones and eutrophication. - 4.4.4 Anthropogenic pollution. - 4.4.5 Synergistic effects. - 4.5 Conclusions. - 5 Energy from the sea. - 5.1 Fossil energy carriers from the sea. - 5.1.1 Resource availability of fossil energy carriers. - 5.1.2 Technologies of offshore extraction. - 5.1.3 Environmental impact of fossil energy use. - 5.1.4 Infrastructure. - 5.1.4.1 Mineral oil. - 5.1.4.2 Natural gas. - 5.1.4.3 Carbon dioxide. - 5.1.5 Costs. - 5.1.6 Prospects of fossil-fuel extraction in the oceans. - 5.1.7 Conclusions. - 5.2 Renewable energy. - 5.2.1 Technological possibilities of offshore wind energy and marine energies. - 5.2.1.1 Development status of offshore wind energy. - 5.2.1.2 Development status of marine-energy technologies. - 5.2.2 Global potential of sea-based renewable power generation. - 5.2.2.1 Offshore wind energy. - 5.2.2.2 Marine energies. - 5.2.3 Environmental impact of marine renewable-energy generation. - 5.2.4 Infrastructure. - 5.2.4.1 Offshore logistics for renewable energy. - 5.2.4.2 Offshore storage technologies. - 5.2.5 Costs. - 5.2.5.1 Offshore wind energy. - 5.2.5.2 Marine energies. - 5.3 Vision of a future marine energy system. - 5.3.1 The status quo of marine energy generation. - 5.3.2 A future renewable marine energy system. - 5.3.3 Transformation of the marine energy system - from the status quo to the futureenergy system. - 5.4 Governance. - 5.4.1 Energy policy. - 5.4.2 Marine policy. - 5.4.2.1 Marine spatial planning. - 5.4.2.2 Construction of installations in the sea. - 5.4.2.3 Regulation of oil and gas production. - 5.4.2.4 Regulations on the storage of CO2 in the sea or the seabed. - 5.4.3 Promotion of innovation. - 5.4.3.1 Promotion of systemic innovation. - 5.4.3.2 Technology development. - 5.4.3.3 Innovation potential. - 5.4.3.4 Measures. - 5.5 Conclusions. - 6 Synthesis: The Blue Revolution. - 6.1 The oceans as the common heritage of mankind. - 6.2 Expansion into the oceans. - 6.3 A new initiative for the conservation and sustainable use of the seas. - 6.4 Elements of a new marine policy. - 7 Recommendations for Action. - 7.1 Guiding principles for future ocean governance. - 7.1.1 The oceans as the 'common heritage of mankind'. - 7.1.2 The systemic approach. - 7.1.3 The precautionary principle. - 7.1.4 Ten criteria for a future system of ocean governance. - 7.1.5 Implementation and enforcement. - 7.1.6 A social contract for the seas. - 7.2 The WBGU's vision of a comprehensive reform of the international law of the sea. - 7.2.1 The common heritage of mankind, the systemic approach and the precautionaryprinciple: three guiding principles for ocean management. - 7.2.2 Institutional changes. - 7.2.2.1 A global steward of the seas: the World Oceans Organization. - 7.2.2.2 Regional stewards of the seas: Regional Marine Management Organizations. - 7.2.2.3 Extend the jurisdiction of the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea. - 7.2.3 Rights and duties of states parties on the high seas and in EEZs. - 7.2.3.1 Conservation and sustainable use of the high seas. - 7.2.3.2 Conservation and sustainable use of the Exclusive Economic Zones. - 7.2.4 Instruments. - 7.3 Recommendations for action: the road to a comprehensivereform of the law of the sea. - 7.3.1 Strengthen the knowledge and action base of ocean governance. - 7.3.1.1 Improve marine environmental monitoring. - 7.3.1.2 Process scientific knowledge for policy-makers and support the Regular Process. - 7.3.1.3 Set up a multi-stakeholder forum. - 7.3.2 Create the necessary conditions for sustainable management. - 7.3.3 Develop strategies for future ocean governance. - 7.3.3.1 Develop the Oceans Compact into an Integrated World Oceans Strategy. - 7.3.3.2 Ratify regional, national and local marine strategies. - 7.3.3.3 Take on a pioneering role - forge subglobal alliances. - 7.3.4 Support and flesh out the international law of the sea. - 7.3.4.1 Promote the signing, ratification and implementation of UNCLOS. - 7.3.4.2 Reach a new implementing agreement on biological diversity on the high seas. - 7.3.4.3 Advance the UN Fish Stocks Agreement and Regional Fisheries Management Organizations (RFMOs). - 7.3.5 Strengthen regional ocean governance. - 7.3.5.1 Strengthen and expand the UNEP Regional Seas Programme. - 7.3.5.2 Strengthen regional seas agreements. - 7.3.5.3 Improve dovetailing in regional ocean governance. - 7.3.6 Develop concepts for the joint funding of ocean governance. - 7.3.6.1 Strengthen international financing mechanisms. - 7.3.6.2 Use the mechanisms of the Framework Convention on Climate Change for funding. - 7.3.6.3 Utilize user charges as a source of funding. - 7.3.7 Employ incentive instruments and funding structures. - 7.3.7.1 Create economic incentives for sustainable uses. - 7.3.7.2 Develop funding structures for long-term-oriented investments. - 7.3.8 Strengthen and expand private governance. - 7.3.8.1 Introduce a standardized Europe-wide system of certification for wild-caught fish and seafood. - 7.3.8.2 Improve legal certainty on the WTO-conformity of sustainability standards. - 7.3.9 Considerably expand marine protected areas and spatial planning. - 7.3.9.1 Expand marine protected areas. - 7.3.9.2 Expand cross-border marine spatial planning. - 7.3.10 Promote the harmonization of existing liability regimes. - 7.4 Food from the sea. - 7.4.1 Recommendations for action on marine fisheries. - 7.4.1.1 Overall recommendations for a change of course in fisheries. - 7.4.1.2 Improve the preconditions for knowledge-based fishery. - 7.4.1.3 Reduce subsidies. - 7.4.1.4 Stop wastefulness. - 7.4.1.5 Combat illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing. - 7.4.1.6 Take into account climate change, ocean acidification and other systemic effects. - 7.4.1.7 Reform the European Union's Common Fisheries Policy. - 7.4.1.8 Marine small-scale fisheries in the global context. - 7.4.2 Recommendations for action on aquaculture. - 7.4.2.1 Improve knowledge and data resources. - 7.4.2.2 Promote the development of sustainable aquaculture systems. - 7.4.2.3 Implement international and EU-wide recommendations. - 7.4.2.4 Strengthen economic policy supporting sustainable aquaculture. - 7.4.2.5 Promote cooperation, prevent conflicts. - 7.4.3 Fishing and aquaculture as elements of integrated strategies for food security. - 7.5 Use of energy from the sea for the energy-system transformation. - 7.5.1 Integrated energy, marine and innovation policiesfor the energy-system transformation. - 7.5.1.1 Energy policy. - 7.5.1.2 Marine policy. - 7.5.1.3 Innovation policy. - 7.5.2 Build an offshore supergrid. - 7.5.3 Refrain from marine methane hydrate mining. - 7.5.4 Develop regulations for sub-seabed CCS. - 8 Recommendations for Research and Education. - 8.1 Research in the context of the transformation towards sustainability. - 8.1.1 Key types of research. - 8.1.2 Innovative approaches in German marine research. - 8.2 Transformation research for the oceans. - 8.2.1 Conceptual background. - 8.2.2 Research recommendations. - 8.3 Transformative research for the seas. - 8.3.1 Research on global change. - 8.3.2 Ocean governance. - 8.3.2.1 Ocean governance for the transformation towards sustainability. - 8.3.2.2 Policy instruments for new challenges. - 8.3.3 Food from the sea. - 8.3.3.1 Fisheries. - 8.3.3.2 Aquaculture. - 8.3.3.3 Overarching issues. - 8.3.4 Energy from the sea. - 8.3.4.1 Technology research. - 8.3.4.2 Research on environmental hazards and risks. - 8.4 Recommendations on research policy. - 8.4.1 Stronger integration of interdisciplinary marine research into research programmes. - 8.4.2 Stronger institutionalization of interdisciplinary marine research. - 8.4.3 Strengthening of the interface between science and society in marine research. - 9 References. - 10 Glossary.
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: XXIII, 362 S. : Ill., graph. Darst., Kt.
    Edition: 1. Aufl., Red.-Schluss: 28.02.2013
    ISBN: 9783936191400
    Branch Library: AWI Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Call number: SR 90.0066(61)
    In: Die Maastricht-Stufe in NW-Deutschland
    In: Geologisches Jahrbuch
    Type of Medium: Series available for loan
    Pages: 293 S.
    Series Statement: 61
    Location: Lower compact magazine
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Series available for loan
    Series available for loan
    Hannover : Schweizerbart
    Associated volumes
    Call number: SR 90.0066(45)
    In: Geologisches Jahrbuch
    Type of Medium: Series available for loan
    Pages: VIII, 282 S.
    Series Statement: Geologisches Jahrbuch : Reihe A 45
    Language: German
    Location: Lower compact magazine
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Monograph available for loan
    Monograph available for loan
    Call number: MR 90.0108
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: 61 S.
    Language: German
    Location: Upper compact magazine
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Series available for loan
    Series available for loan
    Rockville, Md. : U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
    Associated volumes
    Call number: SR 90.0947(75-10)
    In: NOAA technical report
    Type of Medium: Series available for loan
    Pages: 5 S.
    Series Statement: NOAA Technical Report : NOS 75-10
    Language: English
    Location: Magazine - must be ordered
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...