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  • 1
    Call number: PIK T 013-04-0251
    In: Beiträge zur Umweltgestaltung
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: 253 S , Ill., graph. Darst., Kt , 21 cm
    ISBN: 3503083243
    Series Statement: Beiträge zur Umweltgestaltung : A 157
    Branch Library: PIK Library
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  • 2
    Monograph available for loan
    Monograph available for loan
    New York : Nova Science Publishers
    Call number: PIK M 370-07-0255
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: p. cm.
    ISBN: 1600214274
    Branch Library: PIK Library
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  • 3
    Call number: PIK N 076-12-0138
    Description / Table of Contents: Contents: Forewords ; Part I Introduction ; 1 Introduction ; Part II Climate Change, Human Security, Societal Stability, and Violent Conflict: Empirical and Theoretical Linkages ; 2 On Environmental Change and Armed Conflict ; 3 Climate Change, Societal Stability, and the SID Project ; 4 Climate Change, Conflict, and Fragility: Getting the Institutions Right ; 5 Theories and Models of Climate-Security Interaction: Framework and Application to a Climate Hot Spot in North Africa ; 6 Global Climate Policy Reinforces Local Social Path-Dependent Structures: More Conflict in the World? ; Part III Climate Change and the Securitization Discourse ; 7 Climate Change and the Environmental Conflict Discourse ; 8 Climate Change as a Driver of Security Policy ; 9 From "Securitization" of Climate Change to "Climatization" of the Security Field: Comparing Three Theoretical Perspectives ; 10 Critical Deconstruction of Environmental Security and Human Security Concepts in the Anthropocene ; 11 Political in Nature: The Conflict-fuelling Character of International Climate Policies ; 12 Security as a Weapon: How Cataclysm Discourses Frame International Climate Negotiations ; 13 Audience: A Weak Link in the Securitization of the Environment? ; 14 Words, Visuals, and the Vanished Enemy: Visual Securitization and the COP15 Opening Film ; Part IV Climate Change and Migration ; 15 Climate Change and Human Migration: Towards a Global Governance System to Protect Climate Refugees ; 16 "Climate Refugees" as Dawning Catastrophe? A Critique of the Dominant ; Quest for Numbers ; 17 Environmentally-Forced Migration in Rural Areas: Security Risks and Threats in Mexico ; 18 Policing Borders in a Time of Rapid Climate Change ; Part V Climate Change and Security in the Middle East ; 19 Climate Change on the Arabian Peninsula - Regional Security,Sustainability Strategies, and Research Needs ; 20 Environmental Degradation, Climate Uncertainties, and HumanVulnerabilities: Realm of Possible Actions toward a Shifting Security Paradigm in the Arab Gulf Monarchies ; 21 Altering Security Dynamics? Climate Change Impacts on Iraq ; 22 Nothing New in the Middle East - Reality and Discourses of Climate Change in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict ; Part VI Climate Change and Security in Africa ; 23 Locating Climate Insecurity: Where Are the Most Vulnerable Places in Africa? ; 24 Climate Change, Resource Competition, and Conflict amongst Pastoral Communities in Kenya ; 25 Climate Change and Violent Conflicts in Nigeria: Human Needs and Relative Deprivation Theories ; 26 Enhancing Security and Resilience of Low-Income Communities to Climate Change in Growing Cities: An Assessment of Flood Management and Planning Regimes in Kampala City, Uganda ; 27 Malnutrition and Conflict in Eastern Africa: Impacts of Resource Variability on Human Security ; Part VII Climate Change and Security in Asia and the Pacific ; 28 Climate Awareness and Adaptation Efficacy for Livelihood Security against Sea Level Rise in Coastal Bangladesh ; 29 Security Implications of Climate Refugees in Urban Slums: A Case Study from Dhaka, Bangladesh ; 30 A Psychological Perspective on Climate Stress in Coastal India ; 31 Routine Violence in Java, Indonesia: Neo-Malthusian and Social Justice Perspectives ; 32 Territorial Integrity and Sovereignty: Climate Change and Security in the Pacific and Beyond ; Part VIII Improving Climate Security: Cooperative Policies and Capacity-Building ; 33 Securitization of Climate Change in the United Nations 2007-2010 ; 34 Climate Change, Peacekeeping, and Perspectives for UN Reform ; 35 International Climate Change Policies: The Potential Relevance of REDD+ For Peace and Stability ; 36 The Role of Information Systems in Improving Resilience and Security through Innovation-Oriented Capacity Building ; 37 Policy Responses to Climate Change in the Mediterranean and MENA Region during the Anthropocene ; Part IX Conclusions and Outlook ; 38 Conclusions and Outlook: Research Results and Research Needs
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: XXVII, 868 S. : Ill., graph. Darst., Kt.
    ISBN: 9783642286254
    Series Statement: Hexagon series on human and environmental security and peace 8
    Branch Library: PIK Library
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  • 4
    Call number: PIK N 071-05-0039
    In: Graue Reihe
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: 245 S. : graph. Darst
    Series Statement: Graue Reihe 37
    Branch Library: PIK Library
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  • 5
    Call number: PIK N 071-19-92862
    Description / Table of Contents: From the Contents: Material and Immaterial Cultural Transformation -- A Social Contract for Sustainability -- The Climate Paradox: Policy Declarations and Lack of Implementation; The G-20: Security & Peace Impacts -- Persistence and Transformation of Mindsets: The Canadian Case -- Theories of Transitions to Sustainable Development: Approach of the Dutch Knowledge network of Systems Innovation
    Description / Table of Contents: In this book 60 authors from many disciplines and from 18 countries on five continents examine in ten parts: Moving towards Sustainability Transition; Aiming at Sustainable Peace; Meeting Challenges of the 21st Century: Demographic Imbalances, Temperature Rise and the Climate-Conflict Nexus; Initiating Research on Global Environmental Change, Limits to Growth, Decoupling of Growth and Resource Needs; Developing Theoretical Approaches on Sustainability and Transitions; Analysing National Debates on Sustainability in North America; Preparing Transitions towards a Sustainable Economy and Society, Production and Consumption and Urbanization; Examining Sustainability Transitions in the Water, Food and Health Sectors from Latin American and European Perspectives; Preparing Sustainability Transitions in the Energy Sector; and Relying on Transnational, International, Regional and National Governance for Strategies and Policies Towards Sustainability Transition. This volume is based on workshops held in Mexico (2012) and in the US (2013), on a winter school at Chulalongkorn University, Thailand (2013), and on commissioned chapters. The workshop in Mexico and the publication were supported by two grants by the German Foundation for Peace Research (DSF). All texts in this book were peer-reviewed by scholars from all parts of the world
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: xxxi, 1004 Seiten , Illustrationen, Diagramme
    ISBN: 9783319438825 , 9783319438849 (electronic)
    Series Statement: Hexagon series on human and environmental security and peace Volume 10
    Language: English
    Branch Library: PIK Library
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2014-11-28
    Description: Chemical weathering is an integral part of both the rock and carbon cycles and is being affected by changes in land use, particularly as a result of agricultural practices such as tilling, mineral fertilization, or liming to adjust soil pH. These human activities have already altered the chemical terrestrial cycles and land-ocean flux of major elements, although the extent remains difficult to quantify. When deployed on a grand scale, Enhanced Weathering (a form of mineral fertilization), the application of finely ground minerals over the land surface, could be used to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. The release of cations during the dissolution of such silicate minerals would convert dissolved CO2 to bicarbonate, increasing the alkalinity and pH of natural waters. Some products of mineral dissolution would precipitate in soils or taken up by ecosystems, but a significant portion would be transported to the coastal zone and the open ocean, where the increase in alkalinity would partially counteract “ocean acidification” associated with the current marked increase in atmospheric CO2. Other elements released during this mineral dissolution, like Si, P or K, could stimulate biological productivity, further helping to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. On land, the terrestrial carbon-pool would likely increase in response to Enhanced Weathering in areas where ecosystem growth rates are currently limited by one of the nutrients that would be released during mineral dissolution. In the ocean, the biological carbon pumps (which export organic matter and CaCO3 to the deep ocean) may be altered by the resulting influx of nutrients and alkalinity to the ocean. This review merges current interdisciplinary knowledge about Enhanced Weathering, the processes involved, and the applicability as well as some of the consequences and risks of applying the method.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2019-02-01
    Description: Current mitigation efforts and existing future commitments are inadequate to accomplish the Paris Agreement temperature goals. In light of this, research and debate are intensifying on the possibilities of additionally employing proposed climate geoengineering technologies, either through atmospheric carbon dioxide removal or farther-reaching interventions altering the Earth's radiative energy budget. Although research indicates that several techniques may eventually have the physical potential to contribute to limiting climate change, all are in early stages of development, involve substantial uncertainties and risks, and raise ethical and governance dilemmas. Based on present knowledge, climate geoengineering techniques cannot be relied on to significantly contribute to meeting the Paris Agreement temperature goals.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed , info:eu-repo/semantics/article
    Format: text
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2016-03-05
    Description: The purpose of the study is to model scenarios of technological innovations in the global passenger vehicle fleet, i.e., improvements in the energy economy of average regional vehicle fleets and blending of alternative fuels. This is to quantify the potential CO2 emission reductions that may stem from enhancing "business-as-usual technologies" in cars with respect to a set of baseline car stock projections. The study adopts an international approach quantifying in total 11 world regions, thereby conceptualising regionally distinct growth patterns of average car stocks until 2050. Scenario analysis is used to analyse impacts of alternative futures in car technology, i.e., the adoption of efficiency improvements or the blending of low-carbon biofuels to overcome business-as-usual growth in car-related CO2 emissions. To facilitate the assessment the present study is based on a multi-model approach to car demand, applying two types of methodologies rooted in the economics of consumption, utility maximisation and single equation models, to derived reference scenarios of car stock growth. They assume that preferences are the same throughout world regions, following the American lifestyle of individual passenger vehicle demand. The models are calibrated using empirical data that have been originally collated from international sources for the purpose of the study. Computation results show that given substantial growth in regional vehicle fleets under business-as-usual assumptions particularly in transition and developing regions, technological improvements in vehicle efficiency must be complemented by growing biofuel use with increasing mitigation potential in order to brake the trend of ever rising CO2 emissions. We conclude that a necessary absolute reduction in emissions from the passenger car sector needs tremendous efficiency improvements in the passenger vehicle fleet accompanied by a growing share of biofuel use. However, lifestyle and behavioural changes in overall mobility patterns are imperative to mitigate emissions from the car sector.
    Keywords: ddc:330 ; Straßenverkehr ; Innovation ; Fahrzeugtechnik ; Verkehrsaufkommen ; Treibhausgas-Emissionen ; Luftverschmutzung ; Umweltschutz ; Welt
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: English
    Type: doc-type:workingPaper
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2018-01-17
    Description: [Einleitung] Der Begriff Climate Engineering (CE) fasst verschiedene Technologien zusammen, mit denen bewusst in das Klimasystem der Erde eingegriffen wird, um den anthropogenen Klimawandel zu begrenzen. Dabei lassen sich die CE-Technologien von den herkömmlichen Vermeidungs- und Anpassungsmaßnahmen durch die Tatsache abgrenzen, dass sie ansetzen, nachdem Treibhausgase in die Atmosphäre emittiert wurden, aber bevor es zu einer Anpassung an die Auswirkungen des Klimawandels kommt (Keith 2000). Sie können danach in zwei Gruppen eingeteilt werden, je nachdem ob sie eingesetzt werden, um die atmosphärische Treibhausgaskonzentration zu senken - und damit die Ursache des Klimawandels zurückzuführen - oder ob sie eingesetzt werden, um in die Strahlungsbilanz der Erde einzugreifen und damit die Symptome des Klimawandels abzumildern. Die Technologien der ersten Gruppe werden als Carbon Dioxid Removal (CDR)-Technologien und jene der anderen als Radiation Management (RM)-Technologien bezeichnet. Dabei ist Radiation Management der weitere Begriff, da sowohl Technologien zur direkten Beeinflussung der kurzwelligen (SRM) als auch der langwelligen (TRM) Strahlung beinhaltet sind. Entsprechend könnten Technologien zur ursächlichen Rückführung des Klimawandels eigentlich auch als Concentration Management bezeichnet werden, da theoretisch die atmosphärische Konzentration verschiedener Treibhausgase manipuliert werden könnte (Rickels et al. 2011: 41). Da aber derzeit nur die Konzentration von Kohlendioxid (CO2) beeinflusst wird, wird in der vorliegenden Studie der engere Begriff CDR verwendet. [...]
    Keywords: ddc:330
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: German
    Type: doc-type:report
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  • 10
    ISSN: 1572-9338
    Keywords: conflict ; cooperation ; energy economics ; environmental control ; game theory ; resource allocation ; system dynamics ; 90-99 ; 90A16 ; 90A30 ; 90D50 ; 93C55 ; 93C95
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Mathematics , Economics
    Notes: Abstract The Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) demands reductions in greenhouse gas emissions by the industrialized countries, while developing countries are still permitted to expand their energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. To identify, assess and compare options for avoiding and minimizing anthropogenic climate change, the framework of dynamic-game models (the SCX conflict model and the problem-specific TEM model) is applied to analyze the interaction between energy technologies, emission reductions and economic output with regard to energy use and the relationship between conflict and cooperation in climate policy. Basic variables are energy production, emissions into the enviroment, the energy price and the economic output. Major control parameters are the allocation of funding with regard to various energy options and the degree of international cooperation through technology transfer and capital flow. In particular, the impact of cooperation between industrialized and developing countries is evaluated to understand the role of governments in the transition to sustainable market economies. Simulations and numerical results are presented which can be used in a constructive way to implement a Joint-Implementation Program as an advanced market institution.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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