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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2015-09-23
    Description: Rivers represent a transition zone between terrestric and aquatic environments, as well as a transition zone between methane rich and methane poor environments. Methane concentrations in freshwater systems are in general higher than in marine systems. The Elbe River is one of the important rivers draining into the North Sea and with the Elbe river high amounts of methane are imported into the water column of the North Sea. The major biological sink is the oxidation of methane by aerobic methanotrophic bacteria. Eight cruises from November 2013 until November 2014 were conducted from Hamburg towards Helgoland. Methane oxidation rate was measured with radiotracers and methanotrophic abundance was assessed by q-PCR. Community fingerprinting was performed with monooxygenase intergenic spacer analysis (MISA). Combining all the data we could identify four environments (marine, coast, outer and inner estuary) with significantly different abundances. The marine environment had lowest abundances and highest abundances were found in the inner estuary. Comparison of the corresponding communities is in progress.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2017-01-26
    Description: Methane is an important greenhouse gas and the Elbe River carries high amounts of methane into the North Sea. Methane oxidizing bacteria do have the capability to suppress the release of methane into the atmosphere. However, little is known about the diversity and community composition of these bacteria in an estuarine water column. To gain insight in that matter, the following study extended the field of application of the fingerprinting method monooxygenase intergenic spacer analysis (MISA), from a so far marine to a more complex estuarine environment. For separation of the obtained fingerprints two electrophoretic separation systems, the DNA Analyzer 4300 (Licor) and the Multi NA (Shimadzu) were compared and the better suited system was used to analyze environmental samples along a transect from Hamburg to Helgoland. Sampling took place every two months from November 2013 to November 2014. Besides the analysis of diversity and community structure of methanotrophic bacteria, potential environmental driving forces were determined and limitations of the applied MISA method were discussed. Experiments of this study showed that the DNA Analyzer 4300 has a higher resolution power with respect to the obtained DNA fragments of the MISA fingerprinting method. In addition as compared to the Multi NA the DNA Analyzer 4300 revealed a better reproducibility of results. MISA results of the environmental samples reveal changes in community composition and diversity on a temporal and spatial scale. Due to the salinity gradient along the Hamburg- Helgoland transect, three environmental zones were determined, of which the coastal zone showed the highest diversity estimates. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) revealed a shift in community composition between the riverine and coastal/marine zone. Distance based redundancy analysis (dbRDA) of environmental variables determined “salinity” as the main driver of the observed changes in methanotrophic community composition along the Hamburg-Helgoland transect.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Thesis , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2016-07-19
    Description: The Lena River is one of the biggest Russian rivers draining into the Laptev Sea. Due to predicted increasing temperatures the permafrost areas surrounding the Lena will melt at increasing rates. With this melting high amounts of carbon, either organic or as methane will reach the waters of the Lena and the adjacent Laptev Sea. As methane is an important green house gas its further fate in the Lena Delta is of uttermost importance. Methane oxidation by methanotrophic bacteria is the only biological way to reduce methane concentrations. However, the polar estuary of the Lena River is a challenging environment, with strong fluctuations in salinity and temperature. We determined the activity and abundance of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria (MOB), as well as their population structure. Activity was determined with 3H-CH4 as radioactive tracer, abundance was determined with quantitative PCR and the population structure was characterized by a fingerprinting method (MISA). Methane concentrations were rather low (41 ± 44 nM), as well as methane oxidation rates (1.1 ± 1.6 nM/d). In polar water (cold and saline) highest activities were found, whereas the highest abundance of MOB was in surface waters. The relation between methane turnover and abiotic factors will be used to characterize the eco-physiology of these polar and estuarine methanotrophs
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2017-11-10
    Description: The Lena River is one of the largest Russian rivers draining into the Laptev Sea. The predicted increases in global temperatures are expected to cause the permafrost areas surrounding the Lena Delta to melt at increasing rates. This melting will result in high amounts of methane reaching the waters of the Lena and the adjacent Laptev Sea. The only biological sink that can lower methane concentrations within this system is methane oxidation by methanotrophic bacteria. However, the polar estuary of the Lena River, due to its strong fluctuations in salinity and temperature, is a challenging environment for bacteria. We determined the activity and abundance of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria by a tracer method and by the quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We described the methanotrophic population with a molecular fingerprinting method (monooxygenase intergenic spacer analysis), as well as the methane distribution (via a headspace method) and other abiotic parameters, in the Lena Delta in September 2013. The median methane concentrations were 22 nmol L−1 for riverine water (salinity (S)  〈 5), 19 nmol L−1 for mixed water (5 〈 S 〈 20) and 28 nmol L−1 for polar water (S 〉 20). The Lena River was not the source of methane in surface water, and the methane concentrations of the bottom water were mainly influenced by the methane concentration in surface sediments. However, the bacterial populations of the riverine and polar waters showed similar methane oxidation rates (0.419 and 0.400 nmol L−1 d−1), despite a higher relative abundance of methanotrophs and a higher estimated diversity in the riverine water than in the polar water. The methane turnover times ranged from 167 days in mixed water and 91 days in riverine water to only 36 days in polar water. The environmental parameters influencing the methane oxidation rate and the methanotrophic population also differed between the water masses. We postulate the presence of a riverine methanotrophic population that is limited by sub-optimal temperatures and substrate concentrations and a polar methanotrophic population that is well adapted to the cold and methane-poor polar environment but limited by a lack of nitrogen. The diffusive methane flux into the atmosphere ranged from 4 to 163 µmol m2 d−1 (median 24). The diffusive methane flux accounted for a loss of 8 % of the total methane inventory of the investigated area, whereas the methanotrophic bacteria consumed only 1 % of this methane inventory. Our results underscore the importance of measuring the methane oxidation activities in polar estuaries, and they indicate a population-level differentiation between riverine and polar water methanotrophs.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 5
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Bussmann, Ingeborg; Hackbusch, Steffen; Schaal, Patrick; Wichels, Antje (2017): Methane distribution and oxidation around the Lena Delta in summer 2013. Biogeosciences, 14(21), 4985-5002, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-4985-2017
    Publication Date: 2020-01-17
    Description: The Lena River is one of the biggest Russian rivers draining into the Laptev Sea. Due to predicted increasing temperatures, the permafrost areas surrounding the Lena Delta will melt at increasing rates. With this melting, high amounts of methane will reach the waters of the Lena and the adjacent Laptev Sea. Methane oxidation by methanotrophic bacteria is the only biological way to reduce methane concentrations within the system. However, the polar estuary of the Lena River is a challenging environment for bacteria, with strong fluctuations in salinity and temperature. We determined the activity (tracer method) and the abundance (qPCR) of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria. We described the methanotrophic population with MISA; as well as the methane distribution (head space) and other abiotic parameters in the Lena Delta in September 2013. In 'riverine water' (S 〈5) we found a median methane concentration of 22 nM, in 'mixed water' (5 〈 S 〈 20) the median methane concentration was 19 nM and in 'polar water' (S 〉 20) a median 28 nM was observed. The Lena River was not the methane source for surface water, and bottom water methane concentrations were mainly influenced by the concentration in surface sediments. However, the methane oxidation rate in riverine and polar water was very similar (0.419 and 0.400 nM/d), but with a higher relative abundance of methanotrophs and a higher 'estimated diversity' with respect to MISA OTUs in the 'rivine water' as compared to 'polar water'. The turnover times of methane ranged from 167 d in 'mixed water', 91 d in 'riverine water' and only 36 d in 'polarwater'. Also the environmental parameters influencing the methane oxidation rate and the methanotrophic population differed between the water masses. Thus we postulate a riverine methanotrophic population limited by sub-optimal temperatures and substrate concentrations and a polar methanotrophic population being well adapted to the cold and methane poor environment, but limited by the nitrogen content. The diffusive methane flux into the atmosphere ranged from 4 -163 µmol m2 d-1 (median 24). For the total methane inventory of the investigated area, the diffusive methane flux was responsible for 8% loss, compared to only 1% of the methane consumed by the methanotrophic bacteria within the system.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 180 data points
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2017-02-08
    Description: The Lena River is one of the biggest Russian rivers draining into the Laptev Sea. Due to predicted increasing temperatures, the permafrost areas surrounding the Lena Delta will melt at increasing rates. With this melting, high amounts of methane will reach the waters of the Lena and the adjacent Laptev Sea. Methane oxidation by methanotrophic bacteria is the only biological way to reduce methane concentrations within the system. However, the polar estuary of the Lena River is a challenging environment for bacteria, with strong fluctuations in salinity and temperature. We determined the activity (tracer method) and the abundance (qPCR) of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria. We described the methanotrophic population with MISA; as well as the methane distribution (head space) and other abiotic parameters in the Lena Delta in September 2013. In riverine water (S 〈 5) we found a median methane concentration of 22 nM, in mixed water (5 〈 S 〈 20) the median methane concentration was 19 nM and in polar water (S 〉 20) a median 28 nM was observed. The Lena River was not the methane source for surface water, and bottom water methane concentrations were mainly influenced by the concentration in surface sediments. However, the methane oxidation rate in riverine and polar water was very similar (0.419 and 0.400 nM/d), but with a higher relative abundance of methanotrophs and a higher estimated diversity with respect to MISA OTUs in the rivine water as compared to polar water. The turnover times of methane ranged from 167 d in mixed water, 91 d in riverine water and only 36 d in polarwater. Also the environmental parameters influencing the methane oxidation rate and the methanotrophic population differed between the water masses. Thus we postulate a riverine methanotrophic population limited by sub-optimal temperatures and substrate concentrations and a polar methanotrophic population being well adapted to the cold and methane poor environment, but limited by the nitrogen content. The diffusive methane flux into the atmosphere ranged from 4–163 µmol m2 d−1 (median 24). For the total methane inventory of the investigated area, the diffusive methane flux was responsible for 8 % loss, compared to only 1 % of the methane consumed by the methanotrophic bacteria within the system.
    Print ISSN: 1810-6277
    Electronic ISSN: 1810-6285
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2017-11-08
    Description: The Lena River is one of the largest Russian rivers draining into the Laptev Sea. The predicted increases in global temperatures are expected to cause the permafrost areas surrounding the Lena Delta to melt at increasing rates. This melting will result in high amounts of methane reaching the waters of the Lena and the adjacent Laptev Sea. The only biological sink that can lower methane concentrations within this system is methane oxidation by methanotrophic bacteria. However, the polar estuary of the Lena River, due to its strong fluctuations in salinity and temperature, is a challenging environment for bacteria. We determined the activity and abundance of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria by a tracer method and by the quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We described the methanotrophic population with a molecular fingerprinting method (monooxygenase intergenic spacer analysis), as well as the methane distribution (via a headspace method) and other abiotic parameters, in the Lena Delta in September 2013. The median methane concentrations were 22nmol L−1 for riverine water (salinity (S) 〈 5), 19nmol L−1 for mixed water (5 〈 S 〈 20) and 28nmol L−1 for polar water (S 〉 20). The Lena River was not the source of methane in surface water, and the methane concentrations of the bottom water were mainly influenced by the methane concentration in surface sediments. However, the bacterial populations of the riverine and polar waters showed similar methane oxidation rates (0.419 and 0.400nmol L−1 d−1), despite a higher relative abundance of methanotrophs and a higher estimated diversity in the riverine water than in the polar water. The methane turnover times ranged from 167 days in mixed water and 91 days in riverine water to only 36 days in polar water. The environmental parameters influencing the methane oxidation rate and the methanotrophic population also differed between the water masses. We postulate the presence of a riverine methanotrophic population that is limited by sub-optimal temperatures and substrate concentrations and a polar methanotrophic population that is well adapted to the cold and methane-poor polar environment but limited by a lack of nitrogen. The diffusive methane flux into the atmosphere ranged from 4 to 163µmol m2 d−1 (median 24). The diffusive methane flux accounted for a loss of 8% of the total methane inventory of the investigated area, whereas the methanotrophic bacteria consumed only 1% of this methane inventory. Our results underscore the importance of measuring the methane oxidation activities in polar estuaries, and they indicate a population-level differentiation between riverine and polar water methanotrophs.
    Print ISSN: 1726-4170
    Electronic ISSN: 1726-4189
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
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