ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    ISSN: 1573-2932
    Keywords: Scots pine ; Pinus sylvestris ; deposition ; element budget ; soil solution ; soil chemistry ; alkaline dust ; pH ; acidification ; sulfur release
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Energy, Environment Protection, Nuclear Power Engineering
    Notes: Abstract Since 1993 we are studying three Scots pine ecosystems along a deposition gradient in north-eastern Germany (formerly GDR). Dramatic reductions of pollutant emissions are reported for the period since 1989/90. S-deposition is high at the sites Roesa and Taura (25 kg S ha−1yr−1) compared to Neuglobsow. Inputs of basic cations, especially Ca, by alkaline dust immissions decrease in the order Roesa 〉 Taura 〉 Neuglobsow. The soil solution data show high concentrations of Ca and SO4 at Roesa decreasing drastically along the deposition gradient. The elevated pH values reflect the impact of alkaline dust deposition particularly in the organic surface layer at Roesa. The site Taura received less base cation deposition and is marked by the lowest pH values throughout the soil profile combined with increased Al concentrations in the solution of the mineral soil. Thus, the composition of the soil solutions clearly reflects the different deposition regimes of the past. The element budgets show that large amounts of base cations, sulfur, and, at Taura, also aluminum are actually released from the soils that were previously stored.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    ISSN: 1573-5036
    Keywords: acid buffering ; element budget ; N-saturation ; N-turnover ; Norway spruce ; mineralisation ; typical Dystrochrept
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition
    Notes: Abstract Element budgets of a heavily damaged Norway spruce ecosystem at Hohe Matzen in the Fichtel Mountains/FRG were studied over 3 years. The trees show severe symptoms of decline and Mg deficiency. The soil is a typic Dystrochrept derived from granite with sandy texture, high stone content, and low base saturation. The budgets show high releases of N, S and Al from the ecosystem as a result of input, buffering and turnover processes. After an increase of proton fluxes in the organic surface layer, a strong reduction of protons in the B horizon was found. This process was accompanied by the release of Al, whereas reactive Al(OH)3 was exhausted in the A horizon. The low ANC is also shown in pH-stat.-titrations. The data indicate a strong mineralisation in the humus layer, which results in a net release of NH4, SO4 and TOC. Nitrification takes place mainly in the A horizon. With respect to the N-budget, the ecosystem is approaching the state of N saturation. The processes of N turnover lead to an internal proton production exceeding the atmospheric input, and thus contributing to soil acidification.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    ISSN: 1573-5036
    Keywords: fertilization ; forest damage ; magnesium deficiency ; magnesium hydroxide ; Norway spruce ; typical Dystrochrept
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition
    Notes: Abstract Main objective of this study was to test the effects of Mg(OH)2-fertilization in a Norway spruce ecosystem showing severe symptoms of Mg-deficiency. The site is characterized by high atmospheric inputs with deposition rates of 1.25 kg H, 42 kg S, and 32 kg N per ha and year. The typic Dystrochrept derived from granite is acidified down to greater depths. The pH-values in soil solution of the organic surface layer and the upper mineral soil are around 3.5. Concentrations of Al, SO4 2-, and especially NO3 - and DOC are very high. The element balance indicates a significant influence of N-inputs and processes of N-turnover on the chemical status of the soil and probably on tree nutrition. Nitrification in the upper mineral soil leads to a transformation of a major part of NH4 + into NO3 -, which is quantitatively leached, resulting in an ecosystem-internal H+-production of 1.8 keq ha-1yr-1. NO3 - and SO4 2- govern the seepage output from the ecosystem. Mg(OH)2 fertilization resulted in manifold increased Mg2+ concentrations in soil solution down to 70 cm soil depth and to a significant increase of pH down to 25 cm mineral soil depth. Nitrate concentrations were elevated after fertilization, but decreased within 15 months below the level of the control plot. As a mean over the whole experimental period, N-output was not increased by fertilization. Despite an elevated internal proton production due to nitrification, acid buffering in the soil was clearly increased, but enhanced Al-mobilization was not observed. Mg/Al- and Ca/H-ratios in soil solution indicate much more favourable conditions for fine root growth. Fertilization also increased the amount of exchangeable Mg down to 40cm mineral soil depth. Mg contents in current-year needles increased after three vegetation periods. Thirty months after application, only 10% and 4% of the fertilized Mg had left the organic surface layer and the mineral soil with seepage water output, respectively.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Plant and soil 168-169 (1995), S. 31-41 
    ISSN: 1573-5036
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition
    Notes: Abstract Internal and external factors like forest management practices and atmospheric deposition may have large influences on the nutrient supply of forest soils. Examples are given for the effects of tree species, harvesting, site history, changes of species and specific soil conditions, nitrogen deposition, and forest growth dynamics. It is concluded from these examples that all of these factors may contribute to soil acidification in forest ecosystems under humid temperate climatic conditions.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    ISSN: 1573-5036
    Keywords: Ash application ; mineral formation ; mineral weathering ; Pinus nigra (Arnold) ; Pinus sylvestris (L.) ; pyrite
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition
    Notes: Abstract Lignite and pyrite contents in the dump materials of the Lusatian opencast mining district in East Germany result in high acidification and salinization potentials. These extreme conditions require considerable amounts of alkaline materials like ash or lime to enable recultivation and revegetation. Investigations at chronosequence sites on different mining substrates show characteristic developments of the soil solution chemistry. Processes like weathering of primary and formation of secondary mineral phases, acid production and buffering, and their impacts on both the solid and the liquid soil phase result in high temporal and spatial dynamics especially in the initial phase of soil and ecosystem development. To study these processes we continuously collected soil solutions from different soil depths at seven sites with two representative soil substrates. All sites were afforested with pine and cover stand ages from 1 to 60 yr. The results show that actual pyrite oxidation occurs at the youngest sites on lignite and pyrite containing substrates leading to extremely low pH values and high Fen+ and SO4 2- concentrations. The considerable acid production causes weathering of aluminium silicates resulting in high Aln+ concentrations. Ca2+ concentrations are unexpectedly high even at low pH showing no correlation to amelioration amounts or depths. Therefore it seems most probable that these mining substrates contain geogenic Ca sources. The transport of dissolved weathering products is limited due to low leaching rates enabling formation of secondary phases which control the actual composition of the soil solution. Depth gradients of the soil solution composition at the chronosequence sites point to a gradual transport and leaching of these secondary phases from the soil profiles. Soil solution composition and dynamics at lignite and pyrite free sites show completely different patterns and have a higher potential for successful sustainable recultivation.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    ISSN: 1573-5036
    Keywords: compost ; fly ash ; lignite ; minesite reclamation ; sewage sludge
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition
    Notes: Abstract Due to a large reclamation (recultivation) demand in the Lusatian lignite mining district, efficient strategies for the rehabilitation of abandoned mine sites are needed. A field study was conducted for comparing the effects of three different fertilizer treatments (mineral fertilizer, sewage sludge and compost) on soil solution chemistry of both a lignite and pyrite containing spoil as well as a lignite and pyrite free spoil. The lignite and pyrite containing spoil was ameliorated with fly ash from a lignite power plant (17–21 t ha−1 CaO), whereas the lignite and pyrite free site received 7.5 t ha−1 CaO in form of limestone. Fertilizer application rates were: mineral fertilizer 120 N, 100 P and 80 K kg ha−1. 19 t ha−1 sewage sludge and 22 t ha−1 compost were applied. Soil solution was sampled in 20, 60 and 130 cm depth for the period of 16 months. Solution was collected every fortnight and analysed for pH, EC, Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, Na+, Fen+, Aln+, Mn2+, Zn2+, NO3 −, NH4 +, SO4 2−, Cl−, PO4 3−, Cinorg and DOC. Lignite and pyrite containing spoil differed clearly from lignite and pyrite free spoil regarding soil solution concentrations and composition. Acidity (H+) produced by pyrite oxidation led to an enhanced weathering of minerals and, therefore, to at least 10 fold higher soil solution concentrations compared to the lignite and pyrite free site. Major ions in solution of the lignite and pyrite containing site were Ca2+, Mg2+, Fen+, Aln+ and SO4 2−, whereas soil solution at the lignite and pyrite free site was dominated by Ca2+, Mg2+ and SO4 2−. At both sites application of mineral fertilizer led to an immediate but short term (about 1 month) increase of NO3 −, NH4 + and K+ concentrations in soil solution down to a depth of 130 cm. Application of sewage sludge caused a long term (about 16 months) increase of NO3 3 − in the topsoil, whereas NO3 − concentrations in the subsoil were significantly lower compared to the mineral fertilizer plot. Compost application resulted in a strong long-term increase of K+ in soil solution, whereas NO3 − concentrations did not increase. Concentrations of PO4 3− in soil solution depend on solution pH and were not correlated with any treatment.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2014-07-23
    Description: Aims The total space of traits covered by the members of plant communities is an important parameter of ecosystem functioning and complexity. We trace the variability of trait space during early plant succession and ask how trait space co-varies with phylogenetic community structure and soil conditions. Particularly, we are interested in the small-scale variability in trait space and the influence of biotic and abiotic filters. Methods We use data on species richness and soil conditions from the first 7 years of initial succession of an artificial catchment in north-eastern Germany. Total functional attribute diversity serves as a proxy to total trait space. Important Findings Total trait space steadily increased during succession. We observed high small-scale variability in total trait space that was positively correlated with species richness and phylogenetic segregation and negatively correlated with total plant cover. Trait space increased with soil carbonate content, while pH and the fraction of sandy material behaved indifferently. Our results indicate that during early succession, habitat filtering processes gain importance leading to a lesser increase in trait space than expected from the increase in species richness alone.
    Print ISSN: 1752-993X
    Electronic ISSN: 1752-9921
    Topics: Biology
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2013-03-08
    Print ISSN: 1810-6277
    Electronic ISSN: 1810-6285
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2013-01-24
    Print ISSN: 1810-6277
    Electronic ISSN: 1810-6285
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2013-12-16
    Description: We investigated surface and vegetation dynamics in the artificial initial ecosystem "Chicken Creek" (Lusatia, Germany) in the years 2006–2011 across a wide spectrum of empirical data. We scrutinized three overarching hypotheses concerning (1) the relations between initial geomorphological and substrate characteristics with surface structure and terrain properties, (2) the effects of the latter on the occurrence of grouped plant species, and (3) vegetation density effects on terrain surface change. Our data comprise and conflate annual vegetation monitoring results, biennial terrestrial laser scans (starting in 2008), annual groundwater levels, and initially measured soil characteristics. The empirical evidence mostly confirms the hypotheses, revealing statistically significant relations for several goal variables: (1) the surface structure properties, local rill density, local relief energy and terrain surface height change; (2) the cover of different plant groups (annual, herbaceous, grass-like, woody, Fabaceae), and local vegetation height; and (3) terrain surface height change showed significant time-dependent relations with a variable that proxies local plant biomass. Additionally, period specific effects (like a calendar-year optimum effect for the occurrence of Fabaceae) were proven. Further and beyond the hypotheses, our findings on the spatiotemporal dynamics during the system's early development grasp processes which generally mark the transition from a geo-hydro-system towards a bio-geo-hydro system (weakening geomorphology effects on substrate surface dynamics, while vegetation effects intensify with time), where pure geomorphology or substrate feedbacks are changing into vegetation–substrate feedback processes.
    Print ISSN: 1726-4170
    Electronic ISSN: 1726-4189
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...