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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2013-08-31
    Description: Dealiased SEASAT SEASAT A Scatterometer System SASS vector winds obtained during the Gulf Of Alaska SEASAT Experiment GOASEX program are processed to obtain superobservations centered on a one degree by one degree grid. The grid. The results provide values for the combined effects of mesoscale variability and communication noise on the individual SASS winds. These superobservations winds are then processed further to obtain estimates of synoptic scale vector winds stress fields, the horizontal divergence of the wind, the curl of the wind stress and the vertical velocity at 200 m above the sea surface, each with appropriate standard deviations of the estimates for each grid point value. They also explain the concentration of water vapor, liquid water and precipitation found by means of the SMMR Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer at fronts and occlusions in terms of strong warm, moist air advection in the warm air sector accompanied by convergence in the friction layer. Their quality is far superior to that of analyses based on conventional data, which are shown to yield many inconsistencies.
    Keywords: EARTH RESOURCES AND REMOTE SENSING
    Type: NAS 1.26:3810 , E84-10169 , NASA-CR-3810
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2016-06-07
    Description: Conventional data obtained in 1983 are contrasted with SEASAT-A scatterometer and scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) data to show how observations at a single station can be extended to an area of about 150,000 square km by means of remotely sensed data obtained in nine minutes. Superobservations at a one degree resolution for the vector winds were estimated along with their standard deviations. From these superobservations, the horizontal divergence, vector wind stress, and the curl of the wind stress can be found. Weather forecasting theory is discussed and meteorological charts of the North Pacific Ocean are presented. Synoptic meteorology as a technique is examined.
    Keywords: METEOROLOGY AND CLIMATOLOGY
    Type: NASA. Marshall Space Flight Center Frontiers of Remote Sensing of the Oceans and Troposphere from Air and Space Platforms; p 557-566
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2011-08-17
    Description: Significant wave heights calculated using a computer-based spectral ocean wave model (Pierson et al., 1966; Salfi, 1974; Lazanoff and Stevenson, 1975) from meteorological data have been compared with significant wave heights measured by Geos 3 for 44 orbit segments obtained during 1975 and 1976. The model specifications were found to be biased too low. Discrepancies between calculated and measured wave heights are also attributable to the poor specifications of the winds over the northern hemisphere oceans.
    Keywords: OCEANOGRAPHY
    Type: Journal of Geophysical Research; 84; July 30
    Format: text
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2013-08-31
    Description: Significant wave heights estimated from the shape of the return pulse wave form of the altimeter on GEOS-3 for forty-four orbit segments obtained during 1975 and 1976 are compared with the significant wave heights specified by the spectral ocean wave model (SOWM), which is the presently operational numerical wave forecasting model at the Fleet Numerical Weather Central. Except for a number of orbit segments with poor agreement and larger errors, the SOWM specifications tended to be biased from 0.5 to 1.0 meters too low and to have RMS errors of 1.0 to 1.4 meters. The much fewer larger errors can be attributed to poor wind data for some parts of the Northern Hemisphere oceans. The bias can be attributed to the somewhat too light winds used to generate the waves in the model. Other sources of error are identified in the equatorial and trade wind areas.
    Keywords: OCEANOGRAPHY
    Type: NASA-CR-62089
    Format: application/pdf
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