ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-12-01
    Description: A structural performance and resizing (SPAR) finite element thermal analysis computer program was used in the heat transfer analysis of the Space Shuttle Orbiter that was subjected to reentry aerodynamic heatings. One wing segment of the right wing (WS 240) and the whole left wing were selected for the thermal analysis. Results showed that the predicted thermal protection system (TPS) temperatures were in good agreement with the space transportation system, trajectory 5 (STS-5) flight-measured temperatures. In addition, calculated aluminum structural temperatures were in fairly good agreement with flight data up to the point of touchdown. Results also showed that the internal free convection has a considerable effect on the change of structural temperatures after touchdown.
    Keywords: AERODYNAMICS
    Type: AIAA PAPER 84-1761
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2011-08-24
    Description: This paper concerns the dynamic modeling and control of multibody, open-chained, structurally flexible, mechanical systems where the bodies are connected by revolute joints. The equations of motion are formulated based on a matrix form of Lagrange's equations for inertial quasi-coordinates. Each body is treated as a substructure of the system. For the purposes of simulation and control, the equations of motion are separated into two sets of equations using a perturbation approach: one to describe large rigid-body motions of the articulated system and the other to describe small linear motions of the bodies about the large motions. A biologically natural control strategy is used for vibration suppression and tracking the prescribed motion.
    Keywords: CYBERNETICS
    Type: In: Dynamics and control of large structures; Proceedings of the 8th VPI&SU Symposium, Blacksburg, VA, May 6-8, 1991 (A93-29328 10-63); p. 119-131.
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2013-08-31
    Description: There has been a long standing interest in the design of controllers for multilegged vehicles. The approach is to apply distributed control to this problem, rather than using parallel computing of a centralized algorithm. Researchers describe a distributed neural network controller for hexapod locomotion which is based on the neural control of locomotion in insects. The model considers the simplified kinematics with two degrees of freedom per leg, but the model includes the static stability constraint. Through simulation, it is demonstrated that this controller can generate a continuous range of statically stable gaits at different speeds by varying a single control parameter. In addition, the controller is extremely robust, and can continue the function even after several of its elements have been disabled. Researchers are building a small hexapod robot whose locomotion will be controlled by this network. Researchers intend to extend their model to the dynamic control of legs with more than two degrees of freedom by using data on the control of multisegmented insect legs. Another immediate application of this neural control approach is also exhibited in biology: the escape reflex. Advanced robots are being equipped with tactile sensing and machine vision so that the sensory inputs to the robot controller are vast and complex. Neural networks are ideal for a lower level safety reflex controller because of their extremely fast response time. The combination of robotics, computer modeling, and neurobiology has been remarkably fruitful, and is likely to lead to deeper insights into the problems of real time sensorimotor control.
    Keywords: MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
    Type: Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Proceedings of the 3rd Annual Conference on Aerospace Computational Control, Volume 2; p 664-673
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2013-08-31
    Description: Equations of motion, control strategy, perturbation, rigid-body maneuvers, quasi-modal equations, and vibration control are discussed for flexible spacecraft.
    Keywords: SPACECRAFT DESIGN, TESTING AND PERFORMANCE
    Type: NASA. Marshall Space Flight Center Structural Dynamics and Control Interaction of Flexible Structures; p 867-880
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2013-08-31
    Description: The vibration response of a rotor system supported by a squeeze film damper (SFD) was experimentally investigated in order to provide experimental data in support of the Rotor/Stator Interactive Finite Element theoretical development. Part of the investigation required the designing and building of a rotor/SFD system that could operate with or without end seals in order to accommodate different SFD lengths. SFD variables investigated included clearance, eccentricity mass, fluid pressure, and viscosity and temperature. The results show inlet pressure, viscosity and clearance have significant influence on the damper performance and accompanying rotor response.
    Keywords: STRUCTURAL MECHANICS
    Type: NAUFP-202-2 , NAS 1.26:168317 , NASA-CR-168317
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2013-08-31
    Description: Structural temperatures were measured on a hypersonic wing test structure during a heating test that simulated a Mach 8 thermal environment. Measured data are compared to design calculations and temperature predictions obtained from a finite-difference thermal analysis.
    Keywords: AIRCRAFT DESIGN, TESTING AND PERFORMANCE
    Type: H-1271 , A-85137 , NASA-TM-85918 , NAS 1.15:85918
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2013-08-31
    Description: Skin temperatures, shear forces, surface static pressures, boundary layer pitot pressures, and boundary layer total temperatures were measured on the external surface of a hollow cylinder that was 3.04 meters long and 0.437 meter in diameter and was mounted beneath the fuselage of the YF-12A airplane. The data were obtained at a nominal free stream Mach number of 3.0 (a local Mach number of 2.9) and at wall to recovery temperature ratios of 0.66 to 0.91. The local Reynolds number had a nominal value of 4,300,000 per meter. Heat transfer coefficients and skin friction coefficients were derived from skin temperature time histories and shear force measurements, respectively. In addition, boundary layer velocity profiles were derived from pitot pressure measurements, and a Reynolds analogy factor was obtained from the heat transfer and skin friction measurements. The measured data are compared with several boundary layer prediction methods.
    Keywords: FLUID MECHANICS AND HEAT TRANSFER
    Type: H-1101 , NASA-TP-1764
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2016-06-07
    Description: A structural performance and resizing finite element thermal analysis computer program was used in the reentry heat transfer analysis of the space shuttle. Two typical wing cross sections and a midfuselage cross section were selected for the analysis. The surface heat inputs to the thermal models were obtained from aerodynamic heating analyses, which assumed a purely turbulent boundary layer, a purely laminar boundary layer, separated flow, and transition from laminar to turbulent flow. The effect of internal radiation was found to be quite significant. With the effect of the internal radiation considered, the wing lower skin temperature became about 39 C (70 F) lower. The results were compared with fight data for space transportation system, trajectory 1. The calculated and measured temperatures compared well for the wing if laminar flow was assumed for the lower surface and bay one upper surface and if separated flow was assumed for the upper surfaces of bays other than bay one. For the fuselage, good agreement between the calculated and measured data was obtained if laminar flow was assumed for the bottom surface. The structural temperatures were found to reach their peak values shortly before touchdown. In addition, the finite element solutions were compared with those obtained from the conventional finite difference solutions.
    Keywords: FLUID MECHANICS AND HEAT TRANSFER
    Type: NASA. Langley Research Center Computational Aspects of Heat Transfer in Struct.; p 295-325
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2016-06-07
    Description: Surface heating rates and surface temperatures for a space shuttle reentry profile were calculated for two wing cross sections and one fuselage cross section. Heating rates and temperatures at 12 locations on the wing and 6 locations on the fuselage are presented. The heating on the lower wing was most severe, with peak temperatures reaching values of 1240 C for turbulent flow and 900 C for laminar flow. For the fuselage, the most severe heating occured on the lower glove surface where peak temperatures of 910 C and 700 C were calculated for turbulent flow and laminar flow, respectively. Aluminum structural temperatures were calculated using a finite difference thermal analyzer computer program, and the predicted temperatures are compared to measured flight data. Skin temperatures measured on the lower surface of the wing and bay 1 of the upper surface of the wing agreed best with temperatures calculated assuming laminar flow. The measured temperatures at bays two and four on the upper surface of the wing were in quite good agreement with the temperatures calculated assuming separated flow. The measured temperatures on the lower forward spar cap of bay four were in good agreement with values predicted assuming laminar flow.
    Keywords: FLUID MECHANICS AND HEAT TRANSFER
    Type: NASA. Langley Research Center Computational Aspects of Heat Transfer in Struct.; p 271-294
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2016-06-07
    Description: Skin temperatures, shearing forces, surface static pressures, and boundary layer pitot pressures and total temperatures were measured on a hollow cylinder 3.04 meters long and 0.437 meter in diameter mounted beneath the fuselage of the YF-12A airplane. The data were obtained at a nominal free stream Mach number of 3.0 and at wall-to-recovery temperature ratios of 0.66 to 0.91. The free stream Reynolds number had a minimal value of 4.2 million per meter. Heat transfer coefficients and skin friction coefficients were derived from skin temperature time histories and shear force measurements, respectively. Boundary layer velocity profiles were derived from pitot pressure measurements, and a Reynolds analogy factor of 1.11 was obtained from the measured heat transfer and skin friction data. The skin friction coefficients predicted by the theory of van Driest were in excellent agreement with the measurements. Theoretical heat transfer coefficients, in the form of Stanton numbers calculated by using a modified Reynolds analogy between skin friction and heat transfer, were compared with measured values. The measured velocity profiles were compared to Coles' incompressible law-of-the-wall profile.
    Keywords: AERODYNAMICS
    Type: YF-12 Experiments Symp., Vol. 1; p 259-286
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...