ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2019-07-01
    Description: © The Author(s), 2019. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in Foltz, G. R., Brandt, P., Richter, I., Rodriguez-Fonsecao, B., Hernandez, F., Dengler, M., Rodrigues, R. R., Schmidt, J. O., Yu, L., Lefevre, N., Da Cunha, L. C., Mcphaden, M. J., Araujo, M., Karstensen, J., Hahn, J., Martin-Rey, M., Patricola, C. M., Poli, P., Zuidema, P., Hummels, R., Perez, R. C., Hatje, V., Luebbecke, J. F., Palo, I., Lumpkin, R., Bourles, B., Asuquo, F. E., Lehodey, P., Conchon, A., Chang, P., Dandin, P., Schmid, C., Sutton, A., Giordani, H., Xue, Y., Illig, S., Losada, T., Grodsky, S. A., Gasparinss, F., Lees, T., Mohino, E., Nobre, P., Wanninkhof, R., Keenlyside, N., Garcon, V., Sanchez-Gomez, E., Nnamchi, H. C., Drevillon, M., Storto, A., Remy, E., Lazar, A., Speich, S., Goes, M., Dorrington, T., Johns, W. E., Moum, J. N., Robinson, C., Perruches, C., de Souza, R. B., Gaye, A. T., Lopez-Paragess, J., Monerie, P., Castellanos, P., Benson, N. U., Hounkonnou, M. N., Trotte Duha, J., Laxenairess, R., & Reul, N. The tropical Atlantic observing system. Frontiers in Marine Science, 6(206), (2019), doi:10.3389/fmars.2019.00206.
    Description: he tropical Atlantic is home to multiple coupled climate variations covering a wide range of timescales and impacting societally relevant phenomena such as continental rainfall, Atlantic hurricane activity, oceanic biological productivity, and atmospheric circulation in the equatorial Pacific. The tropical Atlantic also connects the southern and northern branches of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation and receives freshwater input from some of the world’s largest rivers. To address these diverse, unique, and interconnected research challenges, a rich network of ocean observations has developed, building on the backbone of the Prediction and Research Moored Array in the Tropical Atlantic (PIRATA). This network has evolved naturally over time and out of necessity in order to address the most important outstanding scientific questions and to improve predictions of tropical Atlantic severe weather and global climate variability and change. The tropical Atlantic observing system is motivated by goals to understand and better predict phenomena such as tropical Atlantic interannual to decadal variability and climate change; multidecadal variability and its links to the meridional overturning circulation; air-sea fluxes of CO2 and their implications for the fate of anthropogenic CO2; the Amazon River plume and its interactions with biogeochemistry, vertical mixing, and hurricanes; the highly productive eastern boundary and equatorial upwelling systems; and oceanic oxygen minimum zones, their impacts on biogeochemical cycles and marine ecosystems, and their feedbacks to climate. Past success of the tropical Atlantic observing system is the result of an international commitment to sustained observations and scientific cooperation, a willingness to evolve with changing research and monitoring needs, and a desire to share data openly with the scientific community and operational centers. The observing system must continue to evolve in order to meet an expanding set of research priorities and operational challenges. This paper discusses the tropical Atlantic observing system, including emerging scientific questions that demand sustained ocean observations, the potential for further integration of the observing system, and the requirements for sustaining and enhancing the tropical Atlantic observing system.
    Description: MM-R received funding from the MORDICUS grant under contract ANR-13-SENV-0002-01 and the MSCA-IF-EF-ST FESTIVAL (H2020-EU project 797236). GF, MG, RLu, RP, RW, and CS were supported by NOAA/OAR through base funds to AOML and the Ocean Observing and Monitoring Division (OOMD; fund reference 100007298). This is NOAA/PMEL contribution #4918. PB, MDe, JH, RH, and JL are grateful for continuing support from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel. German participation is further supported by different programs funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, the Deutsche Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF), and the European Union. The EU-PREFACE project funded by the EU FP7/2007–2013 programme (Grant No. 603521) contributed to results synthesized here. LCC was supported by the UERJ/Prociencia-2018 research grant. JOS received funding from the Cluster of Excellence Future Ocean (EXC80-DFG), the EU-PREFACE project (Grant No. 603521) and the BMBF-AWA project (Grant No. 01DG12073C).
    Keywords: tropical Atlantic Ocean ; observing system ; weather ; climate ; hurricanes ; biogeochemistry ; ecosystems ; coupled model bias
    Repository Name: Woods Hole Open Access Server
    Type: Article
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2019-11-15
    Description: © The Author(s), 2019. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in Centurioni, L. R., Turton, J., Lumpkin, R., Braasch, L., Brassington, G., Chao, Y., Charpentier, E., Chen, Z., Corlett, G., Dohan, K., Donlon, C., Gallage, C., Hormann, V., Ignatov, A., Ingleby, B., Jensen, R., Kelly-Gerreyn, B. A., Koszalka, I. M., Lin, X., Lindstrom, E., Maximenko, N., Merchant, C. J., Minnett, P., O'Carroll, A., Paluszkiewicz, T., Poli, P., Poulain, P., Reverdin, G., Sun, X., Swail, V., Thurston, S., Wu, L., Yu, L., Wang, B., & Zhang, D. Global in situ observations of essential climate and ocean variables at the air-sea interface. Frontiers in Marine Science, 6, (2019): 419, doi: 10.3389/fmars.2019.00419.
    Description: The air–sea interface is a key gateway in the Earth system. It is where the atmosphere sets the ocean in motion, climate/weather-relevant air–sea processes occur, and pollutants (i.e., plastic, anthropogenic carbon dioxide, radioactive/chemical waste) enter the sea. Hence, accurate estimates and forecasts of physical and biogeochemical processes at this interface are critical for sustainable blue economy planning, growth, and disaster mitigation. Such estimates and forecasts rely on accurate and integrated in situ and satellite surface observations. High-impact uses of ocean surface observations of essential ocean/climate variables (EOVs/ECVs) include (1) assimilation into/validation of weather, ocean, and climate forecast models to improve their skill, impact, and value; (2) ocean physics studies (i.e., heat, momentum, freshwater, and biogeochemical air–sea fluxes) to further our understanding and parameterization of air–sea processes; and (3) calibration and validation of satellite ocean products (i.e., currents, temperature, salinity, sea level, ocean color, wind, and waves). We review strengths and limitations, impacts, and sustainability of in situ ocean surface observations of several ECVs and EOVs. We draw a 10-year vision of the global ocean surface observing network for improved synergy and integration with other observing systems (e.g., satellites), for modeling/forecast efforts, and for a better ocean observing governance. The context is both the applications listed above and the guidelines of frameworks such as the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) and Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) (both co-sponsored by the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO, IOC–UNESCO; the World Meteorological Organization, WMO; the United Nations Environment Programme, UNEP; and the International Science Council, ISC). Networks of multiparametric platforms, such as the global drifter array, offer opportunities for new and improved in situ observations. Advances in sensor technology (e.g., low-cost wave sensors), high-throughput communications, evolving cyberinfrastructures, and data information systems with potential to improve the scope, efficiency, integration, and sustainability of the ocean surface observing system are explored.
    Description: LC, LB, and VH were supported by NOAA grant NA15OAR4320071 and ONR grant N00014-17-1-2517. RL was supported by NOAA/AOML and NOAA’s Ocean Observation and Monitoring Division. NM was partly supported by NASA grant NNX17AH43G. IK was supported by the Nordic Seas Eddy Exchanges (NorSEE) funded by the Norwegian Research Council (Grant 221780). DZ was partly funded by the Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean (JISAO) under NOAA Cooperative Agreement NA15OAR4320063. RJ was supported by the USACE’s Civil Works 096×3123.
    Keywords: global in situ observations ; air-sea interface ; essential climate and ocean variables ; climate variability and change ; weather forecasting ; SVP drifters
    Repository Name: Woods Hole Open Access Server
    Type: Article
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2019-09-23
    Description: Refined description from AtlantOS work of the societal imperatives for sustained Atlantic Ocean observations, the phenomena to observe, EOVs, and contributing observing networks.
    Type: Report , NonPeerReviewed , info:eu-repo/semantics/book
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2019-03-11
    Description: Evaluation report on the use of subsurface temperature buoy data and on their ability to provide suitable measurements in the ocean boundary layer
    Type: Report , NonPeerReviewed , info:eu-repo/semantics/book
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2019-03-11
    Description: A number of prototypes equipped with different sensors (if more than one exists) will be tested at sea with different methods to avoid bio-fouling. CNRS will conduct evaluation of the test performed by NKE
    Type: Report , NonPeerReviewed , info:eu-repo/semantics/book
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2018-06-11
    Description: Results of a cost and feasibility study of the present and planned integrated Atlantic Ocean Observing System, including assessing the readiness and feasibility of implementation of different observing technologies
    Type: Report , NonPeerReviewed , info:eu-repo/semantics/book
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    AtlantOS
    In:  AtlantOS Deliverable, D3.20 . AtlantOS, 29 pp.
    Publication Date: 2018-12-13
    Description: An improvement in drifting buoy coverage is proposed in the South Atlantic, achieved by deployments using ships of opportunity. A study report on benefits of the improved network will be included in this deliverable. Deployments will be coordinated with NOAA (Third party to Ifremer) and Met Office
    Type: Report , NonPeerReviewed , info:eu-repo/semantics/book
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2019-07-18
    Description: The passive infrared and microwave nadir sounders such as (A)TOVS observe the atmosphere from a polar orbit by directing their scan pointed at the ground up to about 49 degrees from nadir. Except for the pixels located right on the satellite ground track, the radiance measurements collected by these instruments characterize hence atmospheric emission paths which are slanted with respect to the zenithal direction at the ground. At the outer swath edges, the deviations from nadir reach about 60 degrees in terms of Satellite Zenith Angle (SZA). The radiative transfer codes used in operational Numerical Weather Prediction applications make the appropriate corrections to account for the extra path induced by the non-zero SZA. However, no corrections are made to account for the fact that the atmospheric profiles along the slanted line-of-sight (LOS) are different from the vertical because of horizontal gradients in the atmosphere. Using NASA EOS Aqua satellite's orbits, zenith and azimuth angles, as well as three-dimensional fields of temperature, water vapor, and ozone produced by the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, we extracted slanted atmospheric profiles for actual soundings performed by the AIRS and AMSU-A instruments onboard EOS Aqua. We will present the results of our study comparing the calculated brightness temperatures along slanted LOS and vertical LOS with AIRS and AMSU-A observations.
    Keywords: Earth Resources and Remote Sensing
    Type: 14th International TOVS Study Conference; May 18, 2005 - May 25, 2005; Beijing; China
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2018-06-06
    Description: Radiative transfer calculations for nadir-viewing satellites normally assume the atmosphere to be horizontally homogeneous. Yet it has been shown recently that horizontal gradients can lead to significant errors in satellite infrared and microwave soundings. We extend the methodology to backscatter ultra-violet observations of ozone, and present a first estimate of the effect s magnitude. The Solar Backscatter Ultra-Violet/2 (SBUV/2) instrument, a pure nadir sounder, serves as our test bed. Our results indicate that in a vast majority of cases the abovementioned errors can be neglected. However, occurrence of higher errors, particularly at wavelengths longer than 300 nm, coincides with some of the most interesting atmospheric phenomena like tropopause folds and the South polar ozone hole. This leads to a seasonal variation of the magnitude of the effect. Due to the mostly zonal geometry of the ozone distribution, there is also the possibility that biases may be introduced, which is particularly critical if the data are to be assimilated or used to determine trends. The results presented are tested for robustness using different model atmospheres. The influence of horizontal inhomogeneities will be even more pronounced for cross-track sounders and limb viewers, and easier to detect once higher resolution atmospheric models are available. This will be investigated in future studies.
    Keywords: Meteorology and Climatology
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2019-07-18
    Description: The CHAMP and SAC-C missions are the first missions to carry a second-generation 'Blackjack' GPS receiver. One of the new features of this receiver is its ability to sense the lower troposphere closer to the surface than the proof-of-concept GPS/MET 1995 experiment. Since their launch, CHAMP and SAC-C have collected thousands of GPS radio occultations, representing a wealth of measurements available for data assimilation in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models. In order to evaluate the refractivity data derived by JPL from raw radio occultation measurements, we use Data Assimilation Office (DAO) shout forecasts as an independent state of the atmosphere. We compare CHAMP and SAC-C refractivity (processed by JPL) with refractivity calculated from the DAO global fields of temperature, water vapor content and humidity. We will show statistics of the differences as well as Probability Density Functions (PDFs) of the differences. Depending upon availability of AIRS data, we plan to show individual profile comparisons between GPS radio occultation and AIRS retrievals.
    Keywords: Aircraft Communications and Navigation
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...