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  • 1
    Monograph available for loan
    Monograph available for loan
    Washington, D.C. : Mineralogical Society of America
    Associated volumes
    Call number: 11/M 99.0429 ; 11/M 98.0500 ; 11/M 00.0101
    In: Reviews in mineralogy
    Description / Table of Contents: We seek to understand the timing and processes by which our solar system formed and evolved. There are many ways to gain this understanding including theoretical calculations and remotely sensing planetary bodies with a number of techniques. However, there are a number of measurements that can only be made with planetary samples in hand. These samples can be studied in laboratories on Earth with the full range of high-precision analytical instruments available now or available in the future. The precisions and accuracies for analytical measurements in modern Earth-based laboratories are phenomenal. However, despite the fact that certain types of measurements can only be done with samples in hand, these samples will always be small in number and not necessarily representative of an entire planetary surface. Therefore, it is necessary that the planetary material scientists work hand-in-hand with the remote sensing community to combine both types of data sets. This exercise is in fact now taking place through an initiative of NASA's Curation and Analysis Planning Team for Extraterrestrial Materials (CAPTEM). This initiative is named "New Views of the Moon: Integrated Remotely Sensed, Geophysical, and Sample Datasets." As preliminary results of the Lunar Prospector mission become available, and with the important results of the Galileo and Clementine missions now providing new global data sets of the Moon, it is imperative that the lunar science community synthesize these new data and integrate them with one another and with the lunar-sample database. Integrated approaches drawing upon multiple data sets can be used to address key problems of lunar origin, evolution, and resource definition and utilization. The idea to produce this Reviews in Mineralogy (RIM) volume was inspired by the realization that many types of planetary scientists and, for that matter, Earth scientists will need access to data on the planetary sample suite. Therefore, we have attempted to put together, under one cover, a comprehensive coverage of the mineralogy and petrology of planetary materials. The book is organized with an introductory chapter that introduces the reader to the nature of the planetary sample suite and provides some insights into the diverse environments from which they come. Chapter 2 on Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) and Chapter 3 on Chondritic Meteorites deal with the most primitive and unevolved materials we have to work with. It is these materials that hold the clues to the nature of the solar nebula and the processes that led to the initial stages of planetary formation. Chapter 4, 5, and 6 consider samples from evolved asteroids, the Moon and Mars respectively. Chapter 7 is a brief summary chapter that compares aspects of melt-derived minerals from differing planetary environments.
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: xv, 864 S.
    ISBN: 0-939950-46-4 , 978-0-939950-46-1
    ISSN: 1529-6466
    Series Statement: Reviews in Mineralogy 36
    Classification: A.3.6.
    Language: English
    Note: Chapter 1. The Planetary Sample Suite and Environments of Origin by Charles K. Shearer, James J. Papike., and Frans J.M. Rietmeijer, p. 1-01 - 1-28 Chapter 2. Interplanetary Dust Particles by Frans J.M. Rietmeijer, p. 2-01 - 2-96 Chapter 3. Chondritic Meteorites by Adrian J. Brearley and Rhian H. Jones, p. 3-001 - 3-398 Chapter 4. Non-Chondritic Meteorites from Asteroidal Bodies by David Wayne Mittlefehldt, Timothy J. McCoy, Cyrena Anne Goodrich, and Alfred Kracher, p.4-001 - 4-196 Chapter 5. Lunar Samples by James J. Papike, G. Ryder, and Charles K. Shearer, p. 5-001 - 5-234 Chapter 6. Martian Meteorites by Harry Y. McSween, Jr. and Allan H. Treiman, p. 6-01 - 6-54 Chapter 7. Comparative Planetary Mineralogy: Chemistry of Melt- Derived Pyroxene, Feldspar, and Olivine by James J. Papike, p. 7-01 - 7-12
    Location: Reading room
    Location: Reading room
    Location: Reading room
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
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  • 2
    Description / Table of Contents: The pyroxene and amphibole mineral groups have been the focal points of numerous experimental, theoretical, and field-oriented studies in recent years. Many exciting new results have been obtained since the 1966 International Mineralogical Association Symposium on Pyroxenes and Amphiboles held at the University of Cambridge, England. During September 7-11, 1969, another pyroxene-amphibole symposium will be held at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg, Virginia. Pyroxenes and Amphiboles: Crystal Chemistry and Phase Petrology is published to coincide with this symposium and is intended to make generally available some of the current research in this field. Formal papers given at the symposium will include new research results not currently at the manuscript stage, and abstracts for these papers will be published in the January-February, 1970, issue of The American Mineralogist.
    Pages: Online-Ressource (VIII, 332 Seiten)
    Language: English
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2018-06-11
    Description: We have been developing an oxygen barometer based on the valence state of V (V(2+), V(3+), V(4+), and V(5+)) in solar system basaltic glasses. The V valence is determined by synchrotron micro x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), which uses x-ray absorption associated with core-electronic transitions (absorption edges) to reveal a pre-edge peak whose intensity is directly proportional to the valence state of an element. XANES has advantages over other techniques that determine elemental valence because measurements can be made non-destructively in air and in situ on conventional thin sections at a micrometer spatial resolution with elemental sensitivities of approx. 100 ppm. Recent results show that fO2 values derived from the V valence technique are consistent with fO2 estimates determined by other techniques for materials that crystallized above the IW buffer. The fO2's determined by V valence (IW-3.8 to IW-2) for the lunar pyroclastic glasses, however, are on the order of 1 to 2.8 log units below previous estimates. Furthermore, the calculated fO2's decrease with increasing TiO2 contents from the A17 VLT to the A17 Orange glasses. In order to investigate these results further, we have synthesized lunar green and orange glasses and examined them by XANES.
    Keywords: Lunar and Planetary Science and Exploration
    Type: Workshop on Oxygen in the Terrestrial Planets; 35; LPI-Contrib-1203
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2017-10-02
    Description: The absolute and relative abundances of the highly siderophile elements (HSE) present in planetary mantles are primarily controlled by: 1) silicate-metal partitioning during core-mantle differentiation, 2) the subsequent addition of HSE to mantles via continued planetary accretion. Consequently, constraints on the absolute and relative abundances of the HSE in the lunar mantle will provide unique insights to the formation and late accretionary history of not only the Moon, but also Earth. Determining the HSE content of the lunar mantle, however, has proven difficult, because no bona fide mantle rocks have been collected from the moon. The only materials presently available for constraining mantle abundances are lunar volcanic rocks. Lunar basalts typically have very low concentrations of HSE and highly fractionated HSE patterns. Because of our extremely limited understanding of mantle melt partitioning of the HSE, even for terrestrial systems, extrapolations to mantle compositions from basaltic compositions are difficult, except possibly for the less compatible HSE Pt and Pd. Primitive, presumably less fractionated materials, such as picritic glasses are potentially more diagnostic of the lunar interior. Here we report Os isotopic composition data and Re, Os, Ir, Ru, Pt and Pd concentration data for green glass (15426,164) and orange glass (74001,1217). As with previous studies utilizing neutron activation analysis, we are examining different size fractions of the spherules to assess the role of surface condensation in the generation of the HSE abundances.
    Keywords: Lunar and Planetary Science and Exploration
    Type: Lunar and Planetary Science XXXIV; LPI-Contrib-1156
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2017-10-02
    Description: Spinel is a minor but important phase in planetary basalts because its variable composition often reflects basalt petrogenesis. For example, complicated zoning trends in spinel can give clues to melt evolution [1], and V concentrations in chromite lend insight into magma oxygen fugacity (fO2) conditions [2]. Nickel and Co are two elements that are commonly used as a measure of melt fractionation, and their partitioning between olivine and melt is fairly well understood. Less clear is their partitioning into spinel, although [3] has explored Ni and Co systematics in experimental charges. This study documents Ni and Co behavior in early crystallizing spinel (chromite) from several planetary basalts in an attempt to compare our results with [3], and also gain insight into basalt evolution on the three planets.
    Keywords: Geophysics
    Type: Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVI, Part 11; LPI-Contrib-1234-Pt-11
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2011-08-17
    Description: The paper attempts a synthesis of the major-element chemistry, petrography, mineral chemistry, and crystal chemistry of the mare basalts returned by Apollo and Luna missions. A classification of the mare basalts based on major-element chemistry is given, and textural sequences within each major-element group are identified. The mineral chemistry and crystal chemistry of each mineral group are considered within the framework of the major-element groups and the textural sequences. The various classes of models for the origin of the mare basalts and the nature of their source regions are discussed in the context of the major- and trace-element chemistries and experimental investigations.
    Keywords: LUNAR AND PLANETARY EXPLORATION
    Type: Reviews of Geophysics and Space Physics; 14; Nov. 197
    Format: text
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2011-08-17
    Description: Compositionally, lunar mare basalts are similar to some very young subalkaline basalts from terrestrial mid-ocean ridges and to very old pods of basaltic material incorporated into ancient metamorphic rocks. Basalt flows in Mare Imbrium are considered, taking into account the results of orbital gamma ray spectroscopic studies. The results of the analyses of lunar samples obtained from the Apollo missions are evaluated and various models are discussed in connection with an interpretation of the observed conditions.
    Keywords: LUNAR AND PLANETARY EXPLORATION
    Type: EOS; 57; Nov. 197
    Format: text
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2011-08-16
    Keywords: SPACE SCIENCES
    Type: Earth and Planetary Science Letters; 19; 1, Ma; May 1973
    Format: text
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2011-08-16
    Description: Analysis of 'inverted pigeonites' found in Apollo 14 samples 14082 and 14083 (a polymict breccia, the 'white rock') by a combination of optical, electron probe, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. These 'inverted pigeonites' are regarded as samples of plutonic rocks that have been blasted out of the Imbrium Basin. It is also concluded that lunar pigeonites will invert to orthopyroxenes, given sufficiently slow cooling histories even in very anhydrous environments.
    Keywords: SPACE SCIENCES
    Type: Earth and Planetary Science Letters; 14; Mar. 197
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  • 10
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    In:  Other Sources
    Publication Date: 2011-08-16
    Description: Apollo 11 igneous rock vug clinopyroxene composite crystal with tabular pigeonite nucleus and subcalcic augite precipitation
    Keywords: SPACE SCIENCES
    Type: ; ADEMIE DES SCIENCES
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