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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2008-08-23
    Description: Brown fat can increase energy expenditure and protect against obesity through a specialized program of uncoupled respiration. Here we show by in vivo fate mapping that brown, but not white, fat cells arise from precursors that express Myf5, a gene previously thought to be expressed only in the myogenic lineage. We also demonstrate that the transcriptional regulator PRDM16 (PRD1-BF1-RIZ1 homologous domain containing 16) controls a bidirectional cell fate switch between skeletal myoblasts and brown fat cells. Loss of PRDM16 from brown fat precursors causes a loss of brown fat characteristics and promotes muscle differentiation. Conversely, ectopic expression of PRDM16 in myoblasts induces their differentiation into brown fat cells. PRDM16 stimulates brown adipogenesis by binding to PPAR-gamma (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-gamma) and activating its transcriptional function. Finally, Prdm16-deficient brown fat displays an abnormal morphology, reduced thermogenic gene expression and elevated expression of muscle-specific genes. Taken together, these data indicate that PRDM16 specifies the brown fat lineage from a progenitor that expresses myoblast markers and is not involved in white adipogenesis.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2583329/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2583329/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Seale, Patrick -- Bjork, Bryan -- Yang, Wenli -- Kajimura, Shingo -- Chin, Sherry -- Kuang, Shihuan -- Scime, Anthony -- Devarakonda, Srikripa -- Conroe, Heather M -- Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye -- Tempst, Paul -- Rudnicki, Michael A -- Beier, David R -- Spiegelman, Bruce M -- R01 AR044031/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 AR044031-11/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R37 DK031405/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R37 DK031405-27/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2008 Aug 21;454(7207):961-7. doi: 10.1038/nature07182.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, 1 Jimmy Fund Way, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18719582" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adipocytes, Brown/cytology/*metabolism ; Adipocytes, White/metabolism ; Adipose Tissue, Brown/cytology ; Animals ; COS Cells ; *Cell Differentiation/genetics ; Cell Line ; Cercopithecus aethiops ; DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; *Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental ; Male ; Mice ; Muscle Development/genetics ; Muscle, Skeletal/cytology/growth & development/*metabolism ; Myogenic Regulatory Factor 5/genetics ; PPAR gamma/genetics ; Transcription Factors/genetics/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2009-07-31
    Description: Brown adipose cells are specialized to dissipate chemical energy in the form of heat, as a physiological defence against cold and obesity. PRDM16 (PR domain containing 16) is a 140 kDa zinc finger protein that robustly induces brown fat determination and differentiation. Recent data suggests that brown fat cells arise in vivo from a Myf5-positive, myoblastic lineage by the action of PRDM16 (ref. 3); however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for this developmental switch is unclear. Here we show that PRDM16 forms a transcriptional complex with the active form of C/EBP-beta (also known as LAP), acting as a critical molecular unit that controls the cell fate switch from myoblastic precursors to brown fat cells. Forced expression of PRDM16 and C/EBP-beta is sufficient to induce a fully functional brown fat program in naive fibroblastic cells, including skin fibroblasts from mouse and man. Transplantation of fibroblasts expressing these two factors into mice gives rise to an ectopic fat pad with the morphological and biochemical characteristics of brown fat. Like endogenous brown fat, this synthetic brown fat tissue acts as a sink for glucose uptake, as determined by positron emission tomography with fluorodeoxyglucose. These data indicate that the PRDM16-C/EBP-beta complex initiates brown fat formation from myoblastic precursors, and may provide opportunities for the development of new therapeutics for obesity and type-2 diabetes.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2754867/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2754867/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kajimura, Shingo -- Seale, Patrick -- Kubota, Kazuishi -- Lunsford, Elaine -- Frangioni, John V -- Gygi, Steven P -- Spiegelman, Bruce M -- DK081605/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DK31405/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- GM67945/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- HG3456/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- K99 DK087853/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R37 DK031405/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R37 DK031405-28/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- S10-RR-023010/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2009 Aug 27;460(7259):1154-8. doi: 10.1038/nature08262. Epub 2009 Jul 29.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, 44 Binney Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19641492" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adipose Tissue, Brown/*cytology/*metabolism ; Animals ; CCAAT-Enhancer-Binding Protein-beta/genetics/*metabolism ; Cell Differentiation ; Cell Line ; Cells, Cultured ; Choristoma/metabolism ; DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Fibroblasts/cytology/metabolism ; Glucose/metabolism ; Humans ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Multiprotein Complexes ; Myoblasts/*cytology/*metabolism ; Skin/cytology ; Transcription Factors/genetics/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2013-10-29
    Description: Circadian oscillation of body temperature is a basic, evolutionarily conserved feature of mammalian biology. In addition, homeostatic pathways allow organisms to protect their core temperatures in response to cold exposure. However, the mechanism responsible for coordinating daily body temperature rhythm and adaptability to environmental challenges is unknown. Here we show that the nuclear receptor Rev-erbalpha (also known as Nr1d1), a powerful transcriptional repressor, links circadian and thermogenic networks through the regulation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) function. Mice exposed to cold fare considerably better at 05:00 (Zeitgeber time 22) when Rev-erbalpha is barely expressed than at 17:00 (Zeitgeber time 10) when Rev-erbalpha is abundant. Deletion of Rev-erbalpha markedly improves cold tolerance at 17:00, indicating that overcoming Rev-erbalpha-dependent repression is a fundamental feature of the thermogenic response to cold. Physiological induction of uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1) by cold temperatures is preceded by rapid downregulation of Rev-erbalpha in BAT. Rev-erbalpha represses Ucp1 in a brown-adipose-cell-autonomous manner and BAT Ucp1 levels are high in Rev-erbalpha-null mice, even at thermoneutrality. Genetic loss of Rev-erbalpha also abolishes normal rhythms of body temperature and BAT activity. Thus, Rev-erbalpha acts as a thermogenic focal point required for establishing and maintaining body temperature rhythm in a manner that is adaptable to environmental demands.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3839416/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3839416/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Gerhart-Hines, Zachary -- Feng, Dan -- Emmett, Matthew J -- Everett, Logan J -- Loro, Emanuele -- Briggs, Erika R -- Bugge, Anne -- Hou, Catherine -- Ferrara, Christine -- Seale, Patrick -- Pryma, Daniel A -- Khurana, Tejvir S -- Lazar, Mitchell A -- F-32 DK095563/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- F32 DK095526/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK019525/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK19525/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK045586/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK45586/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- U19 DK062434/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Nov 21;503(7476):410-3. doi: 10.1038/nature12642. Epub 2013 Oct 27.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Department of Genetics, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA [2] The Institute for Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24162845" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Acclimatization/genetics/physiology ; Adipose Tissue, Brown/metabolism ; Animals ; Body Temperature Regulation/genetics/*physiology ; Circadian Rhythm/genetics/*physiology ; Cold Temperature ; Down-Regulation ; Ion Channels/metabolism ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mice, Knockout ; Mitochondrial Proteins/metabolism ; Nuclear Receptor Subfamily 1, Group D, Member 1/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Thermogenesis/genetics/physiology ; Time Factors
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2014-12-24
    Description: Obesity is an increasingly prevalent disease regulated by genetic and environmental factors. Emerging studies indicate that immune cells, including monocytes, granulocytes and lymphocytes, regulate metabolic homeostasis and are dysregulated in obesity. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) can regulate adaptive immunity and eosinophil and alternatively activated macrophage responses, and were recently identified in murine white adipose tissue (WAT) where they may act to limit the development of obesity. However, ILC2s have not been identified in human adipose tissue, and the mechanisms by which ILC2s regulate metabolic homeostasis remain unknown. Here we identify ILC2s in human WAT and demonstrate that decreased ILC2 responses in WAT are a conserved characteristic of obesity in humans and mice. Interleukin (IL)-33 was found to be critical for the maintenance of ILC2s in WAT and in limiting adiposity in mice by increasing caloric expenditure. This was associated with recruitment of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1)(+) beige adipocytes in WAT, a process known as beiging or browning that regulates caloric expenditure. IL-33-induced beiging was dependent on ILC2s, and IL-33 treatment or transfer of IL-33-elicited ILC2s was sufficient to drive beiging independently of the adaptive immune system, eosinophils or IL-4 receptor signalling. We found that ILC2s produce methionine-enkephalin peptides that can act directly on adipocytes to upregulate Ucp1 expression in vitro and that promote beiging in vivo. Collectively, these studies indicate that, in addition to responding to infection or tissue damage, ILC2s can regulate adipose function and metabolic homeostasis in part via production of enkephalin peptides that elicit beiging.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4447235/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4447235/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Brestoff, Jonathan R -- Kim, Brian S -- Saenz, Steven A -- Stine, Rachel R -- Monticelli, Laurel A -- Sonnenberg, Gregory F -- Thome, Joseph J -- Farber, Donna L -- Lutfy, Kabirullah -- Seale, Patrick -- Artis, David -- 2-P30 CA016520/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- AI061570/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI074878/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI095466/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI095608/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI097333/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI102942/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- DP2 OD007288/OD/NIH HHS/ -- DP2OD007288/OD/NIH HHS/ -- DP5 OD012116/OD/NIH HHS/ -- DP5OD012116/OD/NIH HHS/ -- F30 AI112023/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- F30-AI112023/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- F31 AG047003/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- F31AG047003/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- K08 AR065577/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- KL2-RR024132/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- P01 AI106697/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P01AI06697/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P30 AR057217/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK019525/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30-DK050306/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30DK19525/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI061570/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI074878/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI095466/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI097333/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI102942/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 AI060516/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32-AI007532/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32-AI060516/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U01 AI095608/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Mar 12;519(7542):242-6. doi: 10.1038/nature14115. Epub 2014 Dec 22.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Jill Roberts Institute for Research in IBD, Joan and Sanford I. Weill Department of Medicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Weill Cornell Medical College, Cornell University, New York, New York 10021, USA [2] Department of Microbiology and Institute for Immunology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; Department of Microbiology and Institute for Immunology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; Institute for Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; Jill Roberts Institute for Research in IBD, Joan and Sanford I. Weill Department of Medicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Weill Cornell Medical College, Cornell University, New York, New York 10021, USA. ; 1] Columbia Center for Translational Immunology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10032, USA [2] Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10032, USA. ; 1] Columbia Center for Translational Immunology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10032, USA [2] Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10032, USA [3] Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10032, USA. ; Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, California 91766, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25533952" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adipocytes/cytology/drug effects ; Adipose Tissue, White/*cytology/*immunology ; Animals ; Energy Metabolism/immunology ; Enkephalin, Methionine/biosynthesis/metabolism ; Eosinophils/immunology/metabolism ; Female ; Homeostasis/drug effects ; Humans ; Immunity, Innate/*immunology ; Interleukins/immunology/pharmacology ; Ion Channels/metabolism ; Lymphocytes/cytology/immunology/*physiology ; Male ; Mice ; Mitochondrial Proteins/metabolism ; Obesity/*immunology/pathology ; Receptors, Interleukin-4/immunology/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2010-03-05
    Description: The worldwide epidemic of obesity has increased the urgency to develop a deeper understanding of physiological systems related to energy balance and energy storage, including the mechanisms controlling the development of fat cells (adipocytes). The differentiation of committed preadipocytes to adipocytes is controlled by PPARgamma and several other transcription factors, but the molecular basis for preadipocyte determination is not understood. Using a new method for the quantitative analysis of transcriptional components, we identified the zinc-finger protein Zfp423 as a factor enriched in preadipose versus non-preadipose fibroblasts. Ectopic expression of Zfp423 in non-adipogenic NIH 3T3 fibroblasts robustly activates expression of Pparg in undifferentiated cells and permits cells to undergo adipocyte differentiation under permissive conditions. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated reduction of Zfp423 expression in 3T3-L1 cells blunts preadipocyte Pparg expression and diminishes the ability of these cells to differentiate. Furthermore, both brown and white adipocyte differentiation is markedly impaired in Zfp423-deficient mouse embryos. Zfp423 regulates Pparg expression, in part, through amplification of the BMP signalling pathway, an effect dependent on the SMAD-binding capacity of Zfp423. This study identifies Zfp423 as a transcriptional regulator of preadipocyte determination.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2845731/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2845731/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Gupta, Rana K -- Arany, Zoltan -- Seale, Patrick -- Mepani, Rina J -- Ye, Li -- Conroe, Heather M -- Roby, Yang A -- Kulaga, Heather -- Reed, Randall R -- Spiegelman, Bruce M -- DK081605/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DK31405/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- F32 DK079507/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- F32 DK079507-01/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- F32 DK079507-02/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- K08 HL79172-01/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- K99 DK081605/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK040561/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK040561-14/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DC008295/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/ -- R01 DC008295-04/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/ -- R01DC008295/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2010 Mar 25;464(7288):619-23. doi: 10.1038/nature08816. Epub 2010 Mar 3.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Cancer Biology and Division of Metabolism and Chronic Disease, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20200519" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adipose Tissue/*cytology ; Animals ; *Cell Differentiation ; DNA-Binding Proteins/*metabolism ; Female ; *Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mice, Knockout ; NIH 3T3 Cells ; PPAR gamma/metabolism ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Smad Proteins/metabolism ; Transcription Factors/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2010-05-08
    Description: 〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2907667/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2907667/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ishibashi, Jeff -- Seale, Patrick -- DK081605/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R00 DK081605/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R00 DK081605-03/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2010 May 28;328(5982):1113-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1190816. Epub 2010 May 6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institute for Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism and the Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20448151" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adipocytes, Brown/cytology/*physiology ; Adipocytes, White/cytology/*metabolism ; Adrenergic beta-3 Receptor Agonists ; Adrenergic beta-Agonists/pharmacology ; Animals ; Body Weight ; Cyclooxygenase 2/genetics/*metabolism ; *Energy Metabolism ; Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic ; Mice ; Mice, Transgenic ; Norepinephrine/metabolism/pharmacology ; Obesity/therapy ; Prostaglandins/*metabolism ; Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-3/metabolism ; Receptors, Prostaglandin/metabolism ; *Signal Transduction ; *Thermogenesis
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2014-10-08
    Description: Brown adipocytes and muscle and dorsal dermis descend from precursor cells in the dermomyotome, but the factors that regulate commitment to the brown adipose lineage are unknown. Here, we prospectively isolated and determined the molecular profile of embryonic brown preadipose cells. Brown adipogenic precursor activity in embryos was confined to...
    Print ISSN: 0027-8424
    Electronic ISSN: 1091-6490
    Topics: Biology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2014-08-22
    Description: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal, neurodegenerative disease that causes death of motor neurons. ALS patients and mouse models of familial ALS display organismal level metabolic dysfunction, which includes increased energy expenditure despite decreased lean mass. The pathophysiological relevance of abnormal energy homeostasis to motor neuron disease remains unclear. Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone that regulates whole-animal energy expenditure. Here, we report that placing mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mice in a leptin-deficient background improves energy homeostasis and slows disease progression. Leptin-deficient mutant SOD1 mice possess increased bodyweight and fat mass, as well as decreased energy expenditure. These observations coincide with enhanced survival, improved strength and decreased motor neuron loss. These results suggest that altering whole-body energy metabolism in mutant SOD1 mice can mitigate disease progression. We propose that manipulations that increase fat mass and reduce energy expenditure will be beneficial in the setting of motor neuron disease.
    Print ISSN: 0964-6906
    Electronic ISSN: 1460-2083
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2019
    Description: 〈p〉Metabolic health depends on the capacity of adipose tissue progenitor cells to undergo de novo adipogenesis. The cellular hierarchy and mechanisms governing adipocyte progenitor differentiation are incompletely understood. Through single-cell RNA sequence analyses, we show that the lineage hierarchy of adipocyte progenitors consists of distinct mesenchymal cell types that are present in both mouse and human adipose tissues. Cells marked by dipeptidyl peptidase–4 (DPP4)/CD26 expression are highly proliferative, multipotent progenitors. During the development of subcutaneous adipose tissue in mice, these progenitor cells give rise to intercellular adhesion molecule–1 (ICAM1)/CD54–expressing (CD54+) committed preadipocytes and a related adipogenic cell population marked by 〈i〉Clec11a〈/i〉 and 〈i〉F3〈/i〉/CD142 expression. Transforming growth factor–β maintains DPP4+ cell identity and inhibits adipogenic commitment of DPP4+ and CD142+ cells. Notably, DPP4+ progenitors reside in the reticular interstitium, a recently appreciated fluid-filled space within and between tissues, including adipose depots.〈/p〉
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2010-05-06
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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