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  • 1
    Call number: AWI Bio-24-95729
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: XIV, 354 Seiten , Illustrationen
    ISBN: 0195154312 , 9780195154313 , 978-0-19-515431-3
    Series Statement: Long-Term Ecological Research Network Series
    Language: English
    Note: Contents Contributors Part I. Alaska's Past and Present Environment 1. The Conceptual Basis of LTER Studies in the Alaskan Boreal Forest / F. Stuart Chapin III, john Yarie, Keith Van Cleve, and Leslie A. Viereck 2. Regional Overview of Interior Alaska / James E. Beget, David Stone, and David L Verbyla 3. State Factor Control of Soil Formation in Interior Alaska / Chien-Lu Ping, Richard D. Boone, Marcus H. Clark, Edmond C. Packee, and David K. Swanson 4. Climate and Permafrost Dynamics of the Alaskan Boreal Forest / Larry D. Hinzman, Leslie A. Viereck, Phyllis C. Adams, Vladimir E. Romanovsky, and Kenji Yoshikawa 5. Holocene Development of the Alaskan Boreal Forest / Andrea H. Lloyd, Mary E. Edwards, Bruce P. Finney, Jason A. Lynch, Valerie Barber, and Nancy H. Bigelow Part II. Forest Dynamics 6. Floristic Diversity and Vegetation Distribution in the Alaskan Boreal Forest / F. Stuart Chapin III, Teresa Hollingsworth, David F. Murray, Leslie A. Viereck, and Marilyn D. Walker 7. Successional Processes in the Alaskan Boreal Forest / F. Stuart Chapin III, Leslie A. Viereck, Phyllis C. Adams, Keith Van Cleve, Christopher L. Fastie, Robert A. Ott, Daniel Mann, and Jill F. Johnstone 8. Mammalian Herbivore Population Dynamics in the Alaskan Boreal Forest / Eric Rexstad and Knut Kielland 9. Dynamics of Phytophagous Insects and Their Pathogens in Alaskan Boreal Forests / Richard A. Werner, Kenneth F. Raffa, and Barbara L. Illman 10. Running Waters of the Alaskan Boreal Forest / Mark W. Oswood, Nicholas F. Hughes, and Alexander M. Milner Part III. Ecosystem Dynamics 11. Controls over Forest Production in Interior Alaska / John Yarie and Keith Van Cleve 12. The Role of Fine Roots in the Functioning of Alaskan Boreal Forests / Roger W. Ruess, Ronald L. Hendrick, Jason C. Vogel, and Bjartmar Sveinbjornsson 13. Mammalian Herbivory, Ecosystem Engineering, and Ecological Cascades in Alaskan Boreal Forests / Knut Kielland, John P. Bryant, and Roger W. Ruess 14. Microbial Processes in the Alaskan Boreal Forest / Joshua P. Schimel and F. Stuart Chapin III 15. Patterns of Biogeochemistry in Alaskan Boreal Forests / David W. Valentine, Knut Kielland, F. Stuart Chapin III, A. David McCuire, and Keith Van Cleve Part IV. Changing Regional Processes 16. Watershed Hydrology and Chemistry in the Alaskan Boreal Forest: The Central Role of Permafrost / Larry D. Hinzman, W. Robert Bolton, Kevin C. Petrone, Jeremy B. Jones, and Phyllis C. Adams 17. Fire Trends in the Alaskan Boreal Forest / Eric S. Kasischke, T. Scott Rupp, and David L. Verbyla 18. Timber Harvest in Interior Alaska / Tricia L. Wurtz, Robert A. Ott, and John C. Maisch 19. Climate Feedbacks in the Alaskan Boreal Forest / A. David McCuire and F. Stuart Chapin III 20. Communication of Alaskan Boreal Science with Broader Communities / Elena B. Sparrow, Janice C. Dawe, and F. Stuart Chapin III 21. Summary and Synthesis: Past and Future Changes in the Alaskan Boreal Forest / F. Stuart Chapin III, A. David McCuire, Roger W. Ruess, Marilyn W. Walker, Richard D. Boone, Mary E. Edwards, Bruce P. Finney, Larry D. Hinzman, Jeremy B. Jones, Clenn P. Juday, Eric S. Kasischke, Knut Kielland, Andrea H. Lloyd, Mark W. Oswood, Chien-Lu Ping, Eric Rexstad, Vladimir E. Romanovsky, Joshua P. Schimel, Elena B. Sparrow, Bjartmar Sveinbjornsson, David W. Valentine, Keith Van Cleve, David L. Verbyla, Leslie A. Viereck, Richard A. Werner, Tricia L. Wurtz, and John Yarie Index
    Location: AWI Reading room
    Branch Library: AWI Library
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  • 2
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Freshwater biology 32 (1994), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1365-2427
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: 1. Forest stream food webs depend largely on input of dead riparian zone leaves for their energy, which is converted into living biomass by microbes, macroinvertebrates and fish.2. Temperature has been invoked as important in controlling breakdown rates, and aquatic biologists have suggested that by normalizing processing rates to degree days rather than days, one can ‘factor out’ the effect of temperature and compare processing rates in streams with different thermal regimes (e.g. different seasons or study sites in different biomes).3. We examined processing rates (k) along a latitudinal (i.e. thermal) gradient by using reciprocal transplants of leafpacks. We placed leafpacks of ten tree species (representing a large range of leaf litter quality) in streams in Costa Rica, Michigan and Alaska using coarse-mesh (20mm) litter bags. We then examined both the ‘per day’(kday) and ‘per degree day’ (kdegree day) models of leaf litter processing. While processing rates (per day) were fastest at the Costa Rica site (as expected), rates at the Alaska and Michigan sites were similar to each other, which we would not predict if temperature were the principal factor controlling breakdown rate. If using degree days eliminates any effect of differing thermal regimes, rates should be similar across latitudes; however, rates at the Alaska site were much faster (per degree day) than rates at the sites in Costa Rica and Michigan.4. We compared our data with studies in the North American literature. Regression analysis of kday and kdegree day against latitude of the study site revealed that processing rates (kday) of leaves (from a wide range of tree species in a wide range of stream types) showed no significant change with increasing latitude. However, when normalized for temperature (kDegree day), a positive correlation was found between processing rates and latitude, causing us to reject the hypothesis that normalizing processing rates to cumulative degree days removes the effect of temperature.5. We suggest three hypotheses: (i) shredding insect populations have adapted to the local thermal regime, and invertebrate-mediated processing rates are either similar between regions (showing no latitudinal pattern), or increase with latitude; (ii) microbial populations are less active at colder temperatures, and the rate of microbially mediated processing of leaf litter will show a decrease with latitude, and consequently (iii) the relative importance of invertebrate v microbial processing changes on a latitudinal gradient, with invertebrates being more important at high latitudes.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1573-5117
    Keywords: stream ; shredder ; feeding ; detritus ; riparian ; nutrition
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract Four species of riparian vegetation (alder, birch, willow and poplar) were fertilized with nitrogen, phosphorus, nitrogen + phosphorus, or no fertilizer (control). The resulting leaf detritus (leached but not microbially colonized) was offered to a stream shredder, Hydatophylax variabilis (Trichoptera: Limnephilidae). In one experiment, shredder consumption of leaf detritus from different nutrient treatments (within tree species) was compared, and in a second experiment, consumption of different tree species (within nutrient treatments) was compared. Larvae preferred leaf detritus from nitrogen + phosphorus treatments (except in poplar where nitrogen treatment was preferred). Alder was preferred over other tree species for all treatments. Chemical and physical analyses of leaf litter showed differences between tree species and nutrient treatments in nutrient content, tannins and leaf toughness. Leaf consumption by larvae was positively associated with nitrogen content and negatively associated with condensed tannin content. Species composition and nutrient status of riparian vegetation may strongly influence detrital food webs in streams.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 4
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Hydrobiologia 172 (1989), S. 97-110 
    ISSN: 1573-5117
    Keywords: Alaska ; arctic ; biogeography ; high latitude ; insects ; macroinvertebrates ; rivers ; streams
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract Taxonomic composition of benthic invertebrates in interior Alaskan streams and rivers is summarized from published and unpublished data. Diptera dominate the Alaskan stream fauna and constitute a larger proportion of the benthos in Alaskan streams than in streams of temperate North America. Plecoptera and Ephemeroptera are the next most abundant in Alaskan streams with Trichoptera generally very scarce. Several orders that occur regularly in streams of temperate North America are absent (or in very low abundance) in interior Alaskan streams: Hemiptera, Odonata, Megaloptera, Coleoptera. Net-spinning caddisflies, burrowing mayflies, and several families of stoneflies (Pteronarcyidae, Peltoperlidae and Perlidae) are conspicuous by their absence or extreme scarcity. Taxonomic composition varies significantly among hydrologic regions (major watersheds) and among stream types (springs, headwater streams, small rivers, and large rivers). Only two taxa (Chironomidae and Nemouridae) significantly increase in proportional contribution from south to north while many taxa decrease.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 5
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Hydrobiologia 237 (1992), S. 147-157 
    ISSN: 1573-5117
    Keywords: arctic ; subarctic ; Alaska ; stream ; lotic ; temperature
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract We investigated the thermal ecology of three Alaskan streams. Monument Creek (MC) and Little Poker Creek (LPC) are subarctic streams in interior Alaska; LPC is in a permafrost-dominated valley. Imnavait Creek (IC) is an arctic tundra beaded stream in the northern foothills of the Brooks Range. Water temperatures were recorded with automated dataloggers hourly (LPC) or bi-hourly (MC and IC). Records for MC extend through almost three entire years, while data from IC (three years) and LPC (one year) represent the majority of the ice-free season. We also collected winter water/ice temperatures from IC (1989–1990). Mean annual water temperatures were 1.1 °C (LPC), 2.3 °C (MC), and 2.9 °C (IC), while maxima were 5.8 °C (LPC), 13.0 °C (MC), and 21.4 °C (IC). Water temperature rose in the spring about twice as fast (both mean and maximum daily increase) in MC as in LPC, and again about twice as fast in IC as in MC. A similar pattern was observed during the autumnal decline in water temperature. Maximum daily amplitude followed a similar pattern, with MC (6.6 °C) intermediate between LPC (4.1°) and IC (11.6°). LPC accumulated approximately 400 degree-days above 0 °C, MC approximately 950 degree-days, and IC approximately 1000 degree-days. Although it is about 450 km north of the other streams, the tundra stream (IC) accumulated more degree-days, had higher maximum and mean temperatures, greater daily temperature amplitude, and steeper slopes of vernal temperature rise and autumnal temperature decline than the subarctic streams (LPC and MC). The absence of a canopy of riparian plants, channel morphology, and continuous sunlight during the arctic mid-summer accounted for these higher temperatures. Beaded tundra streams provide a highly seasonal (〈 120 d ice-free) and spatially and temporally complex thermal environment.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 6
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Hydrobiologia 56 (1977), S. 113-120 
    ISSN: 1573-5117
    Keywords: mathematical model ; predators ; regression ; seston ; Simuliidae
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract A mathematical model based on assumptions of proportionality of filter-feeding insect larvae and their food supply and of the ability of the larvae to substantially reduce the sestonic food supply was developed. The predictions of the model were tested by censusing simuliid blackfly larvae in the outlet stream of a mesotrophic lake. Observed trends in simuliid density agree closely with the predictions. Two seston components (diatoms, detritus) increase downstream contrary to prediction. Potential predators of simuliids were censumed. Isoperla spp. decreased with increasing distance below the lake while the perlid stoneflies Calineuria and Hesperoperla seemed to be excluded from the outfall region.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 7
    ISSN: 1573-5117
    Keywords: Caddisflies ; Filterfeeders ; Hydropsychidae ; Lake Outlet ; Regression ; Seston ; Stream ; Trichoptera
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract The abundance patterns of four species of net-spinning caddisflies (Trichoptera : Hydropsychidae) were studied in a Montana (U.S.A.) lake outlet stream. Total Hydropsychidae reached very high densities (X 〉 1400 / 0.2 m2) near the lake outfall but declined precipitously downstream. Abundance patterns generally agree with a published model of filter-feeder / seston interactions in lake outlets. Larval densities were greater on moss-covered substrates and one species occupied habitats of lower water velocity compared to other species. Seston concentrations increased downstream contrary to expectation. Nutrient quality of seston may be important in predicting abundance of stream filter-feeders.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
    ISSN: 1573-515X
    Keywords: Alaska ; biogeochemistry ; permafrost ; streams ; taiga ; watershed
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences
    Notes: Abstract Understanding interactions between permanently frozen soils and stream chemistry is important in predicting the effects of management, natural disturbance and changing permafrost distribution on stream ecosystems and nutrient budgets in subarctic watersheds. Chemical measurements of groundwater, soil water and stream water were made in two watersheds in the taiga of interior Alaska. One watershed (HiP) had extensive permafrost and the other (LoP) had limited permafrost. Soil water collected within the rooting zone (0.3–0.5 m) in both watersheds was high in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) but low in dissolved minerals (dominantly Ca, Mg and Na) and conductivity. The reverse was true for groundwater from springs and wells. Permafrost in the HiP basin prevented deep percolation of water and generated stormflows rich in DOC. The presence of permafrost in HiP resulted in higher fluxes of DOC, DON and DIN into stream water from upland soils.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    ISSN: 1573-515X
    Keywords: Alaska ; biogeochemistry ; permafrost ; streams ; taiga ; watershed
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences
    Notes: Abstract Understanding interactions between permanently frozen soils and stream chemistry is important in predicting the effects of management, natural disturbance and changing permafrost distribution on stream ecosystems and nutrient budgets in subarctic watersheds. Chemical measurements of groundwater, soil water and stream water were made in two watersheds in the taiga of interior Alaska. One watershed (HiP) had extensive permafrost and the other (LoP) had limited permafrost. Soil water collected within the rooting zone (0.3--0.5 m) in both watersheds was high in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) but low in dissolved minerals (dominantly Ca, Mg and Na) and conductivity. The reverse was true for groundwater from springs and wells. Permafrost in the HiP basin prevented deep percolation of water and generated stormflows rich in DOC. The presence of permafrost in HiP resulted in higher fluxes of DOC, DON and DIN into stream water from upland soils.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 1988-03-01
    Print ISSN: 0018-8158
    Electronic ISSN: 1573-5117
    Topics: Biology
    Published by Springer
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