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  • 1
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Coral reefs 18 (1999), S. 141-145 
    ISSN: 1432-0975
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Notes: Abstract  The natural diet and prey abundance of the benthic coral reef hydrozoan Nemalecium lighti, a common tropical species, were studied by analysing the gastrovascular contents of polyps. Prey capture was estimated from 10 samples collected at 3-h intervals during a single diel cycle (1–2 September, 1995) in the San Blas Islands (Panamá). Prey size ranged from 5 to 550 μm, with invertebrate larvae being the main contributor to the diet of the species. Prey items were found in 56–88% of the polyps over the entire diel cycle. Gastrovascular contents varied between 0.93 and 2.13 prey items per polyp. These capture incidences are among the highest reported for cnidarian species. Such rates would allow for high production rates for Nemalecium lighti, consistent with reports of the species’ fast growth and high reproduction rates. The observations suggest that some hydrozoans may be active heterotrophic components in coral reef ecosystems.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2014-10-07
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2014-09-17
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 4
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    Unknown
    In:  [Talk] In: 2. International Symposium on Submarine Canyons, 29.09-01.10.2014, Edinburgh, UK .
    Publication Date: 2017-06-19
    Description: Predictive habitat mapping has shown great promise to improve the understanding of the spatial distribution of benthic habitats. However, although they surely represent an important step forward in process-based ecosystem management, their predictive efficiency is not always tested by independent groundtruthing data. This is particularly true for the deep-sea environment, where sample data are always limited compared to the large extent of the areas to be mapped. The aim of this study is to apply and test different spatial models to statistically predict the distribution of three Cold-Water Coral (CWC) species (Madrepora oculata, Lophelia pertusa and Dendrophyllia cornigera) in the Cap de Creus Canyon (NW Mediterranean), based on high-resolution swath-bathymetry data and video observations from the submersible JAGO (IFM-GEOMAR). Submarine canyons act as specific hosting areas for CWCs, owing to their favourable environmental conditions, which provide habitat and shelter for a wide range of species, including commercially viable fish. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt), General Additive Model (GAM) and decision tree model (Random Forest) were independently applied to represent non-linear species-environment relationships using terrain variables derived from multibeam bathymetry (slope, geomorphologic category, rugosity, aspect, backscatter). Relevant differences between the three models were observed. Nonetheless, the predicted areas where CWCs should be found with higher probabilities coincided for the three methods when a lower spatial scale was considered. According to the models, CWCs are most likely to be found on the medium to steeply sloping, rough walls of the southern flank of the canyon, aligning with the known CWC ecology acquired from previous studies in the area. As a final step, a probabilistic predictive ensemble has been produced merging the outcomes of the three models considered, providing a more robust prediction for the three species. The main insight is that important discrepancies can arise in using different species distribution models, especially when high spatial resolutions are considered. This could in part be the result of the different statistical assumptions behind each of the models. We suggest that a more reliable prediction could be obtained by merging models into spatial ensembles, able to reduce differences and associated uncertainties, showing hence a strong potential as an objective approach in the planning and management of natural resources.
    Type: Conference or Workshop Item , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2017-06-19
    Description: Submarine canyons are known as one of the seafloor morphological features where living cold-water coral (CWC) communities develop in the Mediterranean Sea. We investigated the CWC community of the two westernmost submarine canyons of the Gulf of Lions canyon system: the Cap de Creus Canyon (CCC) and Lacaze-Duthiers Canyon (LDC). Coral associations have been studied through video material recorded by means of a manned submersible and a remotely operated vehicle. Video transects have been conducted and analyzed in order to obtain information on (1) coral bathymetric distribution and density patterns, (2) size structure of coral populations, and (3) coral colony position with respect to the substrate. Madrepora oculata was the most abundant CWC in both canyons, while Lophelia pertusa and Dendrophyllia cornigera mostly occurred as isolated colonies or in small patches. An important exception was detected in a vertical cliff in LDC where a large L. pertusa framework was documented. This is the first record of such an extended L. pertusa framework in the Mediterranean Sea. In both canyons coral populations were dominated by medium and large colonies, but the frequent presence of small-sized colonies also indicate active recruitment. The predominant coral orientation (90° and 135°) is probably driven by the current regime as well as by the sediment load transported by the current flows. In general, no clear differences were observed in the abundance and in the size structure of the CWC populations between CCC and LDC, despite large differences in particulate matter between canyons.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2017-06-20
    Description: In the Mediterranean deep-sea, scleractinian cold-water corals (CWC) are observed to survive at the uppermost end of their presumed thermal distribution range (4–13 °C). Here, we show that 2 common CWC species (i.e. Dendrophyllia cornigera and Desmophyllum dianthus) maintained in aquaria can indeed tolerate considerably elevated seawater temperatures (17.5 ± 0.1 °C), while growing at similar (D. dianthus) or significantly higher (D. cornigera) rates than conspecifics cultured in parallel for 87 days at ambient Mediterranean deep-sea temperature (12.5 ± 0.1 °C). Neither differences in coral appearance nor mortality were evident for both species at either temperature. D. dianthus grew significantly faster (0.23 ± 0.08 % day−1) than D. cornigera (0.05 ± 0.01 % day−1) under ambient thermal conditions. Growth of D. cornigera increased significantly (0.14 ± 0.07 % day−1) at elevated temperature, while Desmophyllum dianthus growth showed no significant difference under both conditions. These findings suggest that D. dianthus and D. cornigera may be capable of surviving in warmer environments than previously reported, and thus challenge temperature as the paramount limiting environmental factor for the occurrence of some CWC species.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
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  • 7
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    Unknown
    Elsevier
    In:  In: Seafloor Geomorphology as Benthic Habitat. , ed. by Harris, P. T. and Baker, E. K. Elsevier, Amsterdam, pp. 457-469. ISBN 978-0-12-385140-6
    Publication Date: 2017-06-20
    Description: The Cap de Creus continental shelf and Cap de Creus canyon are located in the southern most sector of the Gulf of Lions, in the northwestern Mediterranean. The Cap de Creus continental shelf contains sandy and muddy sediments and an abrupt morpho­ logy, with rocky outcrops, relict bioherms, erosive features, and planar bedforms. The Cap de Creus canyon breaches the shelf at a depth of 110 m and denotes a marked dif­ ference in the morphology between the northern and the southern flank, reflecting a different depositional regime. The most common substrates correspond to coarse and medium sands (28%) and silty sediments (40%). The most common megabenthic assemblages of the shelf correspond to the communities of "offshore detritic" (31.95%) and "coastal terrigenous muds" (36.99%), mostly dominated by sea pens, alcyonaceans, and ceriantharians. The northern flank of the Cap de Creus canyon is predominantly depositional, whereas the southern flank is erosional. Rocky outcrops provide the sub­ stratum for cold­water coral (CWC) communities' development, in which the white coral Madrepora oculata is the most abundant species.
    Type: Book chapter , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2017-06-20
    Description: Growth rates of the cold-water corals (CWC) Madrepora oculata, Lophelia pertusa, Desmophyllum dianthus and Dendrophyllia cornigera were measured over 8 mo under controlled conditions (12°C in the dark, fed 5 times a week) by means of the buoyant weight technique. Additionally, linear growth rates were measured in M. oculata and L. pertusa for 2 and 1 yr, respectively. The weight measurements revealed growth rates, expressed as percent growth per day (mean ± SD), of 0.11 ± 0.04 for M. oculata, 0.02 ± 0.01 for L. pertusa, 0.06 ± 0.03 for D. dianthus and 0.04 ± 0.02 % d–1 for D. cornigera. Growth in M. oculata was significantly higher (p 〈 0.0001) than in the other 3 CWC species. For M. oculata and L. pertusa, also linear growth was recorded. These values (mean ± SD) were 0.014 ± 0.007 and 0.024 ± 0.018 mm d–1 for M. oculata and L. pertusa, respectively. This is the first study that compares the growth rates of 4 different CWC species under the same experimental conditions of water flow, temperature, salinity and food supply. These corals have different growth rates, both in terms of total weight increase and linear increase, and these growth rates can be related to interspecific physiological differences. Data on growth rates are essential to understand the population dynamics of CWC as well as the recovery capacity of these communities after disturbance.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
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  • 9
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    Unknown
    In:  Marine Ecology Progress Series, 398 . pp. 149-155.
    Publication Date: 2017-06-26
    Description: ABSTRACT: Little is known about the basic biology of deep-water coral species. In this study, we experimentally assessed the rates of ingestion of Artemia salina adults and nauplii by the 4 Mediterranean cold water coral species Dendrophyllia cornigera, Desmophyllum cristagalli, Madrepora oculata, and Lophelia pertusa. All species ingested A. salina in adult and nauplii forms. L. pertusa showed the highest grazing rate for both prey types, whereas M. oculata showed the lowest capture rates among the 4 species, and was practically unable to ingest adult prey. Capture rates of the 4 coral species ranged between 5 and 8 adult A. salina, and 50 and 280 nauplii polyp–1 h–1. Surprisingly, both capture rates and carbon uptake (adult Artemia ingestion: 994 to 3542 µg C polyp–1 h–1; nauplii ingestion: 78.1 to 462 µg C polyp–1 h–1) were within the range of values found in some tropical corals (which often ingest 0.004 to 3600 prey items polyp–1 h–1). The results show that the capture rates and energy input of the studied cold water coral species appear to be on a level that is comparable to that of other corals, even tropical zooxanthellate species.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2017-06-27
    Description: The occurrence and density of 3 cold-water coral (CWC) species (Madrepora oculata, Lophelia pertusa and Dendrophyllia cornigera) were investigated in the Cap de Creus canyon (northwestern Mediterranean) by conducting and analysing 22 video survey transects. Species distribution patterns were also investigated at 3 spatial extents (km, 100s of m and m) across 3 of the transects using spatial statistics. Additionally, the locations of snagged benthic long-line fishing gear were logged across these 3 transects. Video surveys were carried out by both remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) and the JAGO manned submersible. CWCs were present in 15 of the 22 survey transects, predominantly those covering areas with hard substrate (boulders or hardrock outcrops). M. oculata was the most abundant CWC species in the survey transects, whereas L. pertusa and D. cornigera were much more sparsely distributed, with only isolated colonies observed in the majority of transects. M. oculata showed a significant contagious distribution pattern across the analysed transects, with several scales of spatial pattern and patch size being detected, whereas L. pertusa and D. cornigera were not found in sufficient numbers to apply spatial statistics. Different covariance patterns were found across the transects between snagged fishing gear and the presence of M. oculata. Further investigation of this relationship and the level of hazard posed by long-line fishing to M. oculata colonies is required prior to development of a protective management strategy.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
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