ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2020-01-18
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 763 data points
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2020-01-18
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 28 data points
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2019-07-17
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    ISSN: 1365-246X
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Geosciences
    Notes: Multipenetration heat flow measurements have been made at four sites in deep basins of the west-central Pacific Ocean: the West Mariana Basin, Central Mariana Basin, Nauru Basin and Central Pacific Basin. The final heat flows are, respectively, 46.6 /pm 0.5, 49.4 /pm 0.2, 44.2 /pm 0.9 and 49.5 /pm 1.1 mW m-2. Each site was surveyed by single-channel seismic reflection profiling, and provided a gravity core. The instrument measured thermal conductivity in situ over the entire depth intervals used for determination of the gradients, and the reduction scheme iterated conductivity and heat-capacity changes into the fitting procedure, both of entry frictional decays and of conductivity heat pulse decays. The absolute accuracy of the instrument should approach 2 per cent and the first site would make a good intercalibration standard for heat flow measurement. The heat flow variation between the sites is real, and there is also a significant variation in the isostatically reduced depths of the sites. There is no age progression of either depth or heat flow, and, when five other good multidata points are included, the relationship between depth and heat flow conforms to that expected from simple cooling models only in an average sense for the whole group. The most plausible explanation for the variations is that heat flow and thermal elevation are dependent on different levels of deep lithosphere reheating at different times between 70 and 120 Myr ago. It is suggested that additional topographic variation is caused by the different accumulations of sediment and lava flows at each site, and to errors in the isostatically reduced depths due to incomplete knowledge of the stratigraphy down to the crust-mantle interface. These explanations of the topographic variation could be tested by seismic refraction measurements.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    American Association of Petroleum Geologists
    In:  In: Geological perspectives of global climate change. , ed. by Gerhard, L. C., Harrison, W. E. and Hanson, B. M. Studies in Geology, 47 . American Association of Petroleum Geologists, Tulsa, pp. 121-136.
    Publication Date: 2017-12-07
    Type: Book chapter , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2019-07-20
    Description: Overarching Principles: Must be better than Apollo (coverage, duration, instrument performance); Learn from the Apollo experience. Lunar Geophysical Network (LGN) New Frontiers (NF)-class mission, as part of the NF-5 call. This mission consists of several identical landers distributed across the lunar surface, each carrying geophysical instrumentation. The primary science objectives are to characterize the Moons internal structure, seismic activity, global heat flow budget, bulk composition, & magnetic field. Global distribution of multiple stations. Each station should contain a seismometer, heat flow probe, electromagnetic sounder, laser retroreflector (lunar nearside). Each station must be long-lived (e.g., approximately10 years)to allow other stations (from other countries?) to be integrated with the anchor nodes to form the International Lunar Network. Why LGN? Planetary Science: Moon represents an end-member in planetary evolution (large small body, small rocky planet); Primary planetary differentiation preserved; Key to understanding terrestrial planet initial differentiation. Lunar Science: Heat flow probes yield crustal heat budget estimates; Combined with EMS (ElectroMagnetic Sounding), the temperature profile of the deep interior can be modeled along with mineralogy; Seismic and LLR (Lunar Laser Ranging) data also yield structure and compositional information of the lunar interior; High fidelity data from LGN would enhance the usefulness of the GRAIL (Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory) and SELENE (Selenological and Engineering Explorer) gravity data. Human Exploration: LGN must be established prior to renewed human lunar activity - we do not know the exact locations or causes of the shallow moonquakes (SMQs) - the largest magnitude seismic events recorded by Apollo (1 event per year of magnitude greater than or equal to 5); Establishing surface infrastructure near SMQ epicenters must be avoided.
    Keywords: Lunar and Planetary Science and Exploration; Geophysics
    Type: MSFC-E-DAA-TN66747 , Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC 2019); 18ý22 Mar. 2019; The Woodlands, TX; United States
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2019-07-19
    Description: The Apollo astronauts deployed geothermal heat flow instruments at landing sites 15 and 17 as part of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Packages (ALSEP) in July 1971 and December 1972, respectively. These instruments continuously transmitted data to the Earth until September 1977. Four decades later, the data from the two Apollo sites remain the only set of in-situ heat flow measurements obtained on an extra-terrestrial body. Researchers continue to extract additional knowledge from this dataset by utilizing new analytical techniques and by synthesizing it with data from more recent lunar orbital missions such as the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. In addition, lessons learned from the Apollo experiments help contemporary researchers in designing heat flow instruments for future missions to the Moon and other planetary bodies. For example, the data from both Apollo sites showed gradual warming trends in the subsurface from 1971 to 1977. The cause of this warming has been debated in recent years. It may have resulted from fluctuation in insolation associated with the 18.6-year-cycle precession of the Moon, or sudden changes in surface thermal environment/properties resulting from the installation of the instruments and the astronauts' activities. These types of reanalyses of the Apollo data have lead a panel of scientists to recommend that a heat flow probe carried on a future lunar mission reach 3 m into the subsurface, approx 0.6 m deeper than the depths reached by the Apollo 17 experiment. This presentation describes the authors current efforts for (1) restoring a part of the Apollo heat flow data that were left unprocessed by the original investigators and (2) designing a compact heat flow instrument for future robotic missions to the Moon. First, at the conclusion of the ALSEP program in 1977, heat flow data obtained at the two Apollo sites after December 1974 were left unprocessed and not properly archived through NASA. In the following decades, heat flow data from January 1975 through February 1976, as well as the metadata necessary for processing the data (the data reduction algorithm, instrument calibration data, etc.), were somehow lost. In 2010, we located 450 original master archival tapes of unprocessed data from all the ALSEP instruments for a period of April through June 1975 at the Washington National Records Center. We are currently extracting the heat flow data packets from these tapes and processing them. Second, on future lunar missions, heat flow probes will likely be deployed by a network of small robotic landers, as recommended by the latest Decadal Survey of the National Academy of Science. In such a scenario, the heat flow probe must be a compact system, and that precludes use of heavy excavation equipment such as a rotary drill for reaching the 3-m target depth. The new heat flow system under development uses a pneumatically driven penetrator. It utilizes a stem that winds out of a reel and pushes its conical tip into the regolith. Simultaneously, gas jets, emitted from the cone tip, loosen and blow away the soil. Lab experiments have demonstrated its effectiveness in lunar vacuum.
    Keywords: Lunar and Planetary Science and Exploration
    Type: GSFC.ABS.6860.2012 , American Geophysical Union (AGU)45th Annual Fall Meeting; Dec 03, 2012 - Dec 07, 2012; San Francisco, CA; United States
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2019-07-19
    Description: On the six Apollo lunar landed missions, the Astronauts deployed the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) science stations which measured active and passive seismic events, magnetic fields, charged particles, solar wind, heat flow, the diffuse atmosphere, meteorites and their ejecta, lunar dust, etc. Today s investigators are able to extract new information and make new discoveries from the old ALSEP data utilizing recent advances in computer capabilities and new analysis techniques. However, current-day investigators are encountering problems in trying to use the ALSEP data. The data were in formats often not well described in the published reports and contained rerecording anomalies which required tape experts to resolve. To solve these problems the DPS Lunar Data Node was established at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) NASA Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) in 2008 and is currently in the process of making the existing archived ALSEP data available to current-day investigators in easily useable forms. However, current estimates by NSSDC archivists are that only about 60 percent of the PI processed ALSEP data and less than 30 percent of the raw experiment ALSEP data-of-interest to current lunar science investigators are currently in the NSSDC archives.
    Keywords: Lunar and Planetary Science and Exploration
    Type: GSFC.ABS.6670.2012 , NASA Science Lunar Institute (NLSI) Forum Meeting; Jul 17, 2012 - Jul 19, 2012; Moffett Field, CA; United States
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: Geothermal heat flow measurements are a high priority for the future lunar geophysical network missions recommended by the latest Decadal Survey and previously the International Lunar Network. Because the lander for such a mission will be relatively small, the heat flow instrumentation must be a low-mass and low-power system. The instrument needs to measure both thermal gradient and thermal conductivity of the regolith penetrated. It also needs to be capable of excavating a deep enough hole (approx. 3 m) to avoid the effect of potential long-term changes of the surface thermal environment. The recently developed pneumatic excavation system can largely meet the low-power, low-mass, and the depth requirements. The system utilizes a stem which winds out of a pneumatically driven reel and pushes its conical tip into the regolith. Simultaneously, gas jets, emitted from the cone tip, loosen and blow away the soil. The thermal sensors consist of resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) embedded on the stem and an insitu thermal conductivity probe attached to the cone tip. The thermal conductivity probe consists of a short 'needle' (2.4-mm diam. and 15- to 20-mm length) that contains a platinum RTD wrapped in a coil of heater wire. During a deployment, when the penetrating cone reaches a desired depth, it stops blowing gas, and the stem pushes the needle into the yet-to-be excavated, undisturbed bottom soil. Then, it begins heating and monitors the temperature. Thermal conductivity of the soil can determined from the rate of temperature increase with time. When the measurement is complete, the system resumes excavation until it reaches the next targeted depth.
    Keywords: Geosciences (General)
    Type: GSFC-E-DAA-TN13914 , Lunar and Planetary Science Conference; Mar 17, 2014 - Mar 21, 2014; The Woodlands, TX; United States
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: Geothermal heat flow probes were deployed on the Apollo 15 and 17 missions as part of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP). At each landing site, the astronauts drilled 2 holes, 10-m apart, and installed a probe in each. The holes were 1- and 1.5-m deep at the Apollo 15 site and 2.5-m deep at the Apollo 17 sites. The probes monitored surface temperature and subsurface temperatures at different depths. At the Apollo 15 site, the monitoring continued from July 1971 to January 1977. At the Apollo 17 site, it did from December 1972 to September 1977. Based on the observations made through December 1974, Marcus Langseth, the principal investigator of the heat flow experiments (HFE), determined the thermal conductivity of the lunar regolith by mathematically modeling how the seasonal temperature fluctuation propagated down through the regolith. He also determined the temperature unaffected by diurnal and seasonal thermal waves of the regolith at different depths, which yielded the geothermal gradient. By multiplying the thermal gradient and the thermal conductivity, Langseth obtained the endogenic heat flow of the Moon as 21 mW/m(exp 2) at Site 15 and 16 mW/m(exp 2) at Site 17.
    Keywords: Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics; Spacecraft Propulsion and Power
    Type: GSFC-E-DAA-TN20946 , Lunar and Planetary Science Conference; Mar 16, 2015 - Mar 20, 2015; The Woodlands, TX; United States
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...