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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2019-04-04
    Description: This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA's project to demonstrate that careful design of aircraft contour the resultant sonic boom can maintain a tailored shape, propagating through a real atmosphere down to ground level. The areas in covered in this presentation are: (1) Past airborne shock measurement efforts, (2) SR-71 Sonic Boom Propagation Experiment (3) F-5E Inlet Spillage Shock Measurement (4) Flight test approach (5) GPS data (6) Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstration (SSBD) Mach calibration (7) Super Blanik L-23 sailplane (8) Near-field probing (8a)Maneuvers (8b) Control Room Displays (8c) Pressure Instrumentation (8d) Signatures.
    Keywords: Aircraft Design, Testing and Performance
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2011-08-24
    Description: Engineers at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility (NASA-Dryden) have conducted two flight research programs with lightweight, low-power miniaturized instrumentation systems built around commercial data loggers. One program quantified the performance of a radio-controlled model airplane. The other program was a laminar boundary-layer transition experiment on a manned sailplane. The purpose of this paper is to report NASA-Dryden personnel's flight experience with the miniaturized instrumentation systems used on these two programs. The paper will describe the data loggers, the sensors, and the hardware and software developed to complete the systems. The paper also describes how the systems were used and covers the challenges encountered to make them work. Examples of raw data and derived results will be shown as well. Finally, future plans for these systems will be discussed.
    Keywords: AIRCRAFT DESIGN, TESTING AND PERFORMANCE
    Type: AIAA PAPER 92-4111 , In: AIAA Biennial Flight Test Conference, 6th, Hilton Head Island, SC, Aug. 24-26, 1992, Technical Papers (A93-11251 01-05); p. 309-322.
    Format: text
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2013-08-31
    Description: This report is a user's manual for version 2.1 of pEst, a FORTRAN 77 computer program for interactive parameter estimation in nonlinear dynamic systems. The pEst program allows the user complete generality in definig the nonlinear equations of motion used in the analysis. The equations of motion are specified by a set of FORTRAN subroutines; a set of routines for a general aircraft model is supplied with the program and is described in the report. The report also briefly discusses the scope of the parameter estimation problem the program addresses. The report gives detailed explanations of the purpose and usage of all available program commands and a description of the computational algorithms used in the program.
    Keywords: COMPUTER PROGRAMMING AND SOFTWARE
    Type: NASA-TM-88280 , H-1390 , NAS 1.15:88280
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 4
    ISSN: 1520-6904
    Source: ACS Legacy Archives
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2004-12-03
    Description: This paper describes ground-level measurements of sonic boom signatures made as part of the SR-71 sonic boom propagation experiment recently completed at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Ground-level measurements were the final stage of this experiment which also included airborne measurements at near and intermediate distances from an SR-71 research aircraft. The types of sensors were deployed to three station locations near the aircraft ground track. Pressure data collected for flight conditions from Mach 1.25 to Mach 1.60 at altitudes from 30,000 to 48,000 ft. Ground-level measurement techniques, comparisons of data sets from different ground sensors, and sensor system strengths and weaknesses are discussed. The well-known N-wave structure dominated r sonic boom signatures generated by the SR-71 aircraft at most of these conditions. Variations in boom shape caused by atmospheric turbulence, focusing effects, or both, were observed for several flights. Peak pressure and boom event duration showed some dependence on aircraft gross weight. The sonic boom signatures collected in this experiment are being compiled in a data base for distribution in support of the High Speed Research Program.
    Keywords: Acoustics
    Type: The 1995 NASA High-Speed Research Program Sonic Boom Workshop; Volume 1; 199-219; NASA-CP-3335-Vol-1
    Format: text
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2011-08-24
    Description: A joint NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility and Johnson Space Center program was conducted to determine the feasibility of the autonomous recovery of a spacecraft using a ram-air parafoil system for the final stages of entry from space that included a precision landing. The feasibility of this system was studied using a flight model of a spacecraft in the generic shape of a flattened biconic that weighed approximately 150 lb and was flown under a commercially available, ram-air parachute. Key elements of the vehicle included the Global Positioning System guidance for navigation, flight control computer, ultrasonic sensing for terminal altitude, electronic compass, and onboard data recording. A flight test program was used to develop and refine the vehicle. This vehicle completed an autonomous flight from an altitude of 10,000 ft and a lateral offset of 1.7 miles that resulted in a precision flare and landing into the wind at a predetermined location. At times, the autonomous flight was conducted in the presence of winds approximately equal to vehicle airspeed. Several novel techniques for computing the winds postflight were evaluated. Future program objectives are also presented.
    Keywords: AIRCRAFT COMMUNICATIONS AND NAVIGATION
    Type: Journal of Aircraft (ISSN 0021-8669); 31; 5; p. 1101-1108
    Format: text
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2011-08-24
    Description: Engineers at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility (NASA-Dryden) have conducted two flight research programs with lightweight, low-power miniaturized instrumentation systems built around commercial data loggers. One program quantified the performance of a radio-controlled model airplane. The other program was a laminar boundary-layer transition experiment on a manned sailplane. The purpose of this article is to report NASA-Dryden personnel's flight experience with the miniaturized instrumentation systems used on these two programs. This article will describe the data loggers, the sensors, and the hardware and software developed to complete the systems. It also describes how the systems were used and covers the challenges encountered to make them work. Examples of raw data and derived results will be shown as well. For some flight research applications where miniaturized instrumentation is a requirement, the authors conclude that commercially available data loggers and sensors are viable alternatives. In fact, the data loggers and sensors make it possible to gather research-quality data in a timely and cost-effective manner.
    Keywords: AERONAUTICS (GENERAL)
    Type: Journal of Aircraft (ISSN 0021-8669); 31; 5; p. 1016-1021
    Format: text
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2011-08-19
    Keywords: AIRCRAFT STABILITY AND CONTROL
    Type: Journal of Guidance, Control, and Dynamics (ISSN 0731-5090); 11; 213-219
    Format: text
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: NASA Dryden Flight Research Center and NASA Johnson Space Center are jointly conducting a phased program to determine the feasibility of the autonomous recovery of a spacecraft using a ram-air parafoil system for the final stages of entry from space to a precision landing. The feasibility is being studied using a flight model of a spacecraft in the generic shape of a flattened biconic that weighs approximately 120 lb and is flown under a commercially available ram-air parafoil. Key components of the vehicle include the global positioning system (GPS) guidance for navigation, a flight control computer, an electronic compass, a yaw rate gyro, and an onboard data recorder. A flight test program is being used to develop and refine the vehicle. The primary flight goal is to demonstrate autonomous flight from an altitude of 3,000 m (10,000 ft) with a lateral offset of 1.6 km (1.0 mi) to a precision soft landing. This paper summarizes the progress to date. Much of the navigation system has been tested, including a heading tracker that was developed using parameter estimation techniques and a complementary filter. The autoland portion of the autopilot is still in development. The feasibility of conducting the flare maneuver without servoactuators was investigated as a means of significantly reducing the servoactuator rate and load requirements.
    Keywords: AERODYNAMICS
    Type: NASA-TM-4599 , H-1987 , NAS 1.15:4599 , AIAA PAPER 94-2141 , Biennial Flight Test Conference; 20-23 Jun. 1994; Colorado Springs, CO; United States
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: This paper describes ground-level measurements of sonic boom signatures made as part of the SR-71 sonic boom propagation experiment recently completed at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Ground level measurements were the final stage of this experiment which also included airborne measurements at near and intermediate distances from an SR-71 research aircraft. Three types of sensors were deployed to three station locations near the aircraft ground track. Pressure data were collected for flight conditions from Mach 1.25 to Mach 1.60 at altitudes from 30,000 to 48,000 ft. Ground-level measurement techniques, comparisons of data sets from different ground sensors, and sensor system strengths and weaknesses are discussed. The well-known N-wave structure dominated the sonic boom signatures generated by the SR-71 aircraft at most of these conditions. Variations in boom shape caused by atmospheric turbulence, focusing effects, or both were observed for several flights. Peak pressure and boom event duration showed some dependence on aircraft gross weight. The sonic boom signatures collected in this experiment are being compiled in a data base for distribution in support of the High Speed Research Program.
    Keywords: AERODYNAMICS
    Type: NASA-TM-104310 , H-2062 , NAS 1.15:104310 , NASA High Speed Research Program Sonic Boom Workshop; 11-13 Sep. 1995; Hampton, VA; United States
    Format: application/pdf
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