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  • 1
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    Wiley
    In:  Geophysical Prospecting, 67 (6). pp. 1557-1570.
    Publication Date: 2019-07-08
    Description: Although narrow‐azimuth towed‐streamer data provides good image quality for structural interpretation, it is generally accepted that for wide‐azimuth marine surveys seabed receivers deliver superior seismic reflection measurements and seismically derived reservoir attributes. However, seabed surveys are not widely used due to the higher acquisition costs when compared to streamer acquisition. In recent years, there have been significant engineering efforts to automate receiver deployment and retrieval in order to minimize the cost differential and conduct cost‐efficient seabed receiver seismic surveys. These engineering efforts include industrially engineered nodes, nodes‐on‐a‐rope deployment schemes and even robotic nodes, which swim to and from the deployment location. This move to automation is inevitable, leading to robotization of seismic data acquisition for exploration and development activities in the oil and gas industry. We are developing a robotic‐based technology, which utilizes autonomous underwater vehicles as seismic sensors without the need of using a remotely operated vehicle for deployment and retrieval. In this paper, we describe the autonomous underwater vehicle evolution throughout the project years from initial heavy and bulky nodes to fully autonomous light and flexible underwater receivers. Results obtained from two field pilot tests using different generations of autonomous underwater vehicles indicate that the seismic coupling, and navigation based on underwater acoustics are very reliable and robust.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-07-01
    Description: The main objective of this article is to obtain reservoir properties, such as porosity, both at the well locations and in the interwell regions from seismic data and well logs. The seismic and well-log data sets are from an oil field in eastern Saudi Arabia, and the main target is a Jurassic carbonate reservoir. The geology of carbonate reservoirs in Saudi Arabia is well understood. Reservoir porosity estimation is essential and needs to be determined for flow simulation and reservoir management.A major component of this study is establishing the relation between the P-impedance and porosity using well-log data. An amplitude-versus-angle seismic inversion algorithm was used to invert the three-dimensional impedance volumes (i.e., P-impedance and S-impedance) given partial angle stacks of seismic traces representing reflection amplitude variations with angle of incidence. These impedance volumes were used to estimate porosity between the well locations. The seismic and log data provided a-priori information (i.e., the initial starting model and source wavelet estimate) necessary for obtaining geologically consistent results.
    Print ISSN: 0149-1423
    Electronic ISSN: 0149-1423
    Topics: Geosciences
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2018-07-29
    Print ISSN: 0016-8025
    Electronic ISSN: 1365-2478
    Topics: Geosciences , Physics
    Published by Wiley
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018
    Description: ABSTRACT Although narrow‐azimuth towed‐streamer data provide good image quality for structural interpretation, it is generally accepted that for wide‐azimuth marine surveys seabed receivers deliver superior seismic reflection measurements and seismically derived reservoir attributes. However, seabed surveys are not widely used due to the higher acquisition costs when compared to streamer acquisition. In recent years, there have been significant engineering efforts to automate receiver deployment and retrieval in order to minimize the cost differential and conduct cost‐efficient seabed receiver seismic surveys. These engineering efforts include industrially engineered nodes, nodes on a rope deployment schemes and even robotic nodes, which swim to and from the deployment location. This move to automation is inevitable, leading to robotization of seismic data acquisition for exploration and development activities in the oil and gas industry. We are developing a robotic‐based technology, which utilizes autonomous underwater vehicles as seismic sensors without the need of using a remotely operated vehicle for deployment and retrieval. In this paper, we describe the autonomous underwater vehicle evolution throughout the project years from initial heavy and bulky nodes to fully autonomous light and flexible underwater receivers. Results obtained from two field pilot tests using different generations of autonomous underwater vehicles indicate that the seismic coupling, and navigation based on underwater acoustics are very reliable and robust.
    Print ISSN: 0016-8025
    Electronic ISSN: 1365-2478
    Topics: Geosciences , Physics
    Published by Wiley
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
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