ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Call number: ILP/M 06.0141
    In: Publication of the International Lithosphere Programme
    In: Tectonophysics
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: XIV, 298 S. : Ill., graph. Darst.
    Series Statement: Publication of the International Lithosphere Programme 334
    Location: Reading room
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Call number: ILP/M 06.0142
    In: Publication of the International Lithosphere Programme
    In: Tectonophysics
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: VIII, 292 S. : graph. Darst., Kt.
    Series Statement: Publication of the International Lithosphere Programme 335
    Location: Reading room
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Series available for loan
    Series available for loan
    Boulder, Colo. [u.a.] : Geological Soc. of America
    Associated volumes
    Call number: 9/S 90.0006(208)
    In: Memoir
    Description / Table of Contents: This volume contains a comprehensive, worldwide history of seismological studies of the Earth's crust using controlled sources from 1850 to 2005. Essentially all major seismic projects on land and the most important oceanic projects are covered. The time period 1850 to 1939 is presented as a general synthesis, and from 1940 onward the history and results are presented in separate chapters for each decade, with the material organized by geographical region. Each chapter highlights the major advances achieved during that decade in terms of data acquisition, processing technology, and interpretation methods. For all major seismic projects, the authors provide specific details on field observations, interpreted crustal cross sections, and key references. They conclude with global and continental-scale maps of all field measurements and interpreted Moho contours. An accompanying DVD contains important out-of-print publications and an extensive collection of controlled-source data, location maps, and crustal cross sections.
    Type of Medium: Series available for loan
    Pages: XV, 764 S. : Ill., graph. Darst., Kt. + 1 DVD-ROM (12 cm)
    ISBN: 9780813712086
    Series Statement: Memoir / The Geological Society of America 208
    Classification: A.2.4.
    Location: Reading room
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Series available for loan
    Series available for loan
    Boulder : The Geological Society of America
    Associated volumes
    Call number: S 90.0006(172)
    In: Memoir
    Type of Medium: Series available for loan
    Pages: x, 826 S. + 3 Kt.-Beil.
    ISBN: 081371172X
    Series Statement: Memoir / The Geological Society of America 172
    Classification: A.2.1.
    Language: English
    Location: Lower compact magazine
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Call number: ILP/M 06.0351
    In: Publication of the International Lithosphere Programme
    In: Tectonophysics
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: 265 S. : Ill., graph. Darst.
    Series Statement: [Publication of the International Lithosphere Programme] 358,1-4 : special issue
    Language: English
    Location: Reading room
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    ISSN: 1420-9136
    Keywords: Seismic refraction ; mylonites ; fractures ; seismic reflection ; low velocity zone ; microcracks
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Geosciences , Physics
    Notes: Abstract The internal properties within and adjacent to fault zones are reviewed, principally on the basis of laboratory, borehole, and seismic refraction and reflection data. The deformation of rocks by faulting ranges from intragrain microcracking to severe alteration. Saturated microcracked and mildly fractured rocks do not exhibit a significant reduction in velocity, but, from borehole measurements, densely fractured rocks do show significantly reduced velocities, the amount of reduction generally proportional to the fracture density. Highly fractured rock and thick fault gouge along the creeping portion of the San Andreas fault are evidenced by a pronounced seismic low-velocity zone (LVZ), which is either very thin or absent along locked portions of the fault. Thus there is a correlation between fault slip behavior and seismic velocity structure within the fault zone; high pore pressure within the pronounced LVZ may be conductive to fault creep. Deep seismic reflection data indicate that crustal faults sometimes extend through the entire crust. Models of these data and geologic evidence are consistent with a composition of deep faults consisting of highly foliated, seismically anisotropic mylonites.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    AGU
    In:  Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, 100 (B6). pp. 9761-9788.
    Publication Date: 2017-11-27
    Description: Seismic techniques provide the highest-resolution measurements of the structure of the crust and have been conducted on a worldwide basis. We summarize the structure of the continental crust based on the results of seismic refraction profiles and infer crustal composition as a function of depth by comparing these results with high-pressure laboratory measurements of seismic velocity for a wide range of rocks that are commonly found in the crust. The thickness and velocity structure of the crust are well correlated with tectonic province, with extended crust showing an average thickness of 30.5 km and orogens an average of 46.3 km. Shields and platforms have an average crustal thickness nearly equal to the global average. We have corrected for the nonuniform geographical distribution of seismic refraction profiles by estimating the global area of each major crustal type. The weighted average crustal thickness based on these values is 41.1 km. This value is 10% to 20% greater than previous estimates which underrepresented shields, platforms, and orogens. The average compressional wave velocity of the crust is 6.45 km/s, and the average velocity of the uppermost mantle (Pn velocity) is 8.09 km/s. We summarize the velocity structure of the crust at 5-km depth intervals, both in the form of histograms and as an average velocity-depth curve, and compare these determinations with new measurements of compressional wave velocities and densities of over 3000 igneous and metamorphic rock cores made to confining pressures of 1 GPa. On the basis of petrographic studies and chemical analyses, the rocks have been classified into 29 groups. Average velocities, densities, and standard deviations are presented for each group at 5-km depth intervals to crustal depths of 50 km along three different geotherms. This allows us to develop a model for the composition of the continental crust. Velocities in the upper continental crust are matched by velocities of a large number of lithologies, including many low-grade metamorphic rocks and relatively silicic gneisses of amphibolite facies grade. In midcrustal regions, velocity gradients appear to originate from an increase in metamorphic grade, as well as a decrease in silica content. Tonalitic gneiss, granitic gneiss, and amphibolite are abundant midcrustal lithologies. Anisotropy due to preferred mineral orientation is likely to be significant in upper and midcrustal regions. The bulk of the lower continental crust is chemically equivalent to gabbro, with velocities in agreement with laboratory measurements of mafic granulite. Garnet becomes increasingly abundant with depth, and mafic garnet granulite is the dominant rock type immediately above the Mohorovicic discontinuity. Average compressional wave velocities of common crustal rock types show excellent correlations with density. The mean crustal density calculated from our model is 2830 kg/m3, and the average SiO2 content is 61.8%.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 375 (1995), S. 15-15 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] ON page 50 of this issue, Vinnik et al.1 add fresh fuel to a heated geological debate. The question is whether the continents have deep, stable roots that have remained practically unchanged since the Precambrian era, or whether plate motion in geologically recent times ...
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Terra nova 8 (1996), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1365-3121
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Geosciences
    Notes: The study of the directional dependence of seismic velocities (seismic anisotropy) promises more refined insight into mineral composition and physical properties of the crystalline crust than conventional deep seismic refraction or reflection profiles providing average values of P-and S-wave velocities. The alignment of specific minerals by ductile rock deformation, for instance, causes specific types of seismic anisotropy which can be identified by appropriate field measurements. Vice versa, the determination of anisotropy can help to discriminate between different rock candidates in the deep crust. Seismic field measurements at the Continental Deep Drilling Site (KTB, S Germany) are shown as an example that anisotropy has to be considered in crustal studies. At the KTB, the dependence of seismic velocity on the direction of wave propagation in situ was found to be compatible with the texture, composition and fracture density of drilled crustal rocks.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2002-01-01
    Description: Voluminous anorthosite intrusions are common in mid-Proterozoic crust. Historically, two end-member models have been proposed for the origin of these anorthosites. In the first model anorthosites derive from fractionation of a mantle source leaving a residue of metagabbro in the lower crust; in the second model anorthosites are the product of partial melting of the lower crust with residual pyroxene and high-grade minerals (i.e. a pyroxenitic and/or metapelitic lower crust). Although a general consensus has developed that the first model provides the best fit to petrological and geochemical constraints, the sparse evidence for mafic and ultramafic counterparts to the anorthosites leaves the issue still unresolved. We use the absolute P-wave velocity and the ratio between P- and S-wave velocities (VP/VS) to infer the composition of the lower crust beneath the Marcy Anorthosite (New York State, USA). Seismic refraction data reveal a lower crust 20 km thick, where VP and VP/VS range from top to bottom between 7.0 km s-1 and 7.2 {+/-} 0.1 and 1.84 km s-1 and 1.81 {+/-} 0.02, respectively. Laboratory measurements on rock samples indicate that these seismic properties are typical of plagioclase-rich rocks. Magmatic underplating of basaltic melts is a mechanism to form plagioclase-rich bulk composition for the Grenville crust. At the bottom of the lower crust, increase of P-wave velocity, slight decrease of VP/VS ratios and the presence of a low-reflective seismic Moho are additional observations supporting crustmantle interactions related to magmatic underplating. High P-wave velocity (8.6 km s-1) in the upper mantle may indicate that the ultramafic portion (e.g. pyroxenites) of the underplated magma has become eclogite. High average P-wave velocity (6.7 km s-1) and VP/VS (1.81), and the exceptional abundance of anorthosites-norites-troctolites among the rocks exposed at the surface, indicate that the Grenville Proterozoic crust may have a unique plagioclase-rich bulk composition. We suggest magmatic underplating, occurring either over a wide time span or with separate syn- and post-collisional magmatic pulses, as being a major crust-forming mechanism operating in mid-Proterozoic time.
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...