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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2013-08-31
    Description: In September 1982 the Secretary of Commerce was authorized (by Title II of H.R. 5890 of the 97th Congress) to plan and provide for the management and operation of the civil land remote sensing satellite systems, to provide for user fees, and to plan for the transfer of the ownership and operation of future civil operational land remote sensing satellite systems to the private sector. As part of the planning for transfer, a number of approaches were to be compared including wholly private ownership and operation of the system by an entity competitively selected, mixed government/private ownership and operation, and a legislatively-chartered privately-owned corporation. The results of an analysis and comparison of a limited number of financial and organizational approaches for either transfer of the ownership and operation of the civil operational land remote sensing program to the private sector or government retention are presented.
    Keywords: EARTH RESOURCES AND REMOTE SENSING
    Type: ECON-82-175 , NAS 1.26:176337 , E86-10008 , NASA-CR-176337
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2011-08-24
    Description: This review is concerned with how chronobiological results concerning the human circadian timekeeping system ( biological clock'), its response to changes in schedule, and its influence on performance ability can be used to improve shift worker wellbeing, safety and productivity.
    Keywords: Behavioral Sciences
    Type: Work and stress (ISSN 0267-8373); Volume 4; 3; 227-36
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2011-08-24
    Description: Prolonged periods of head-down bed rest (HDBR) are commonly used to mimic the effects of microgravity. HDBR has been shown to produce, as in space, a cephalad redistribution of circulating blood volume with an increase in central blood volume which induces the early adaptations in blood volume regulating hormones. Changes in atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), arginine vasopressin (AVP), renin activity and aldosterone have been observed. Many reports describe these endocrine adaptations but few investigations of rhythms are in the literature. We proposed to evaluate the circadian rhythms of the hormones and electrolytes involved in the hydro-electrolytic regulation during a HDBR study which was designed to simulate a 17-day spaceflight (Life and Microgravity Spacelab experiment, LMS, NASA).
    Keywords: Aerospace Medicine
    Type: Journal of gravitational physiology : a journal of the International Society for Gravitational Physiology (ISSN 1077-9248); Volume 8; 1; P121-2
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2011-08-24
    Description: We investigated in six men the impact of a 17-day head-down bed rest (HDBR) on the circadian rhythms of the hormones and electrolytes involved in hydroelectrolytic regulation. This HDBR study was designed to mimic an actual spaceflight. Urine samples were collected at each voiding before, during and after HDBR. Urinary excretion of aldosterone, arginine vasopressin (AVP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), cortisol, electrolytes (Na+ and K+) and creatinine were determined. HDBR resulted in a significant reduction of body mass (P 〈 0.01) and of caloric intake [mean (SEM) 2,778 (37) kcal.24 h(-1) to 2,450 (36) kcal.24 h(-1), where 1 kcal.h(-1) = 1.163 J.s(-1); P〈 0.01]. There was a significant increase in diastolic blood pressure [71.8 (0.7) mmHg vs 75.6 (0.91) mmHg], with no significant changes in either systolic blood pressure or heart rate. The nocturnal hormonal decrease of aldosterone was clearly evident only before and after HDBR, but the day/night difference did not appear during HDBR. The rhythm of K+ excretion was unchanged during HDBR, whereas for Na+ excretion, a large decrease was shown during the night as compared to the day. The circadian rhythm of cortisol persisted. These data suggest that exposure to a 17-day HDBR could induce an exaggeration of the amplitude of the Na+ rhythm and abolition of the aldosterone rhythm.
    Keywords: Aerospace Medicine
    Type: European journal of applied physiology (ISSN 1439-6319); Volume 85; 1-2; 74-81
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: The following four issues were assessed in a group of 110 adults between the age of 20 and 59y: (1) the effect of age (regarded as a continuous variable) on polysomnographic sleep characteristics, habitual sleep-diary patterns, and subjective sleep quality; (2) the effects of age on morningness-eveningness; (3) the effects of morningness-eveningness on sleep, after controlling for the effects of age; and (4) the role of morningness-eveningness as a mediator of the age and sleep relationship. Increasing age was related to earlier habitual waketime, earlier bedtime, less time in bed and better mood and alertness at waketime. In the laboratory, increasing age was associated with less time asleep, increased number of awakenings, decreased sleep efficiency, lower percentages of slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, higher percentages of Stage 1 and 2, shorter REM latency and reduced REM activity and density. Increasing age was also associated with higher morningness scores. After controlling for the effects of age, morningness was associated with earlier waketime, earlier bedtime, less time in bed, better alertness at waketime, less time spent asleep, more wake in the last 2 h of sleep, decreased REM activity, less stage REM (min and percentage), more Stage 1 (min and percentage) and fewer minutes of Stage 2. For one set of variables (night time in bed, waketime, total sleep time, wake in the last 2 h of sleep and minutes of REM and REM activity), morningness-eveningness accounted for about half of the relationship between age and sleep. For another set of variables (bedtime, alertness at waketime, percentages of REM and Stage 1), morningness-eveningness accounted for the entire relationship between age and sleep. In conclusion, age and morningness were both important predictors of the habitual sleep patterns and polysomnographic sleep characteristics of people in the middle years of life (20-59 y).
    Keywords: Life Sciences (General)
    Type: Journal of sleep research (ISSN 0962-1105); 6; 4; 230-7
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: A diary-like instrument to measure lifestyle regularity (the 'Social Rhythm Metric'-SRM) was given to 96 subjects (48 women, 48 men), 39 of whom repeated the study after at least one year, with additional objective measures of rest/activity. Lifestyle regularity as measured by the SRM related to age, morningness, subjective sleep quality and time-of-day variations in alertness, but not to gender, extroversion or neuroticism. Statistically significant test-retest correlations of about 0.4 emerged for SRM scores over the 12-30 month delay. Diary-based estimates of bedtime and waketime appeared fairly reliable. In a further study of healthy young men, 4 high SRM scorers ('regular') had a deeper nocturnal body temperature trough than 5 low SRM scorers ('irregular'), suggesting a better functioning circadian system in the 'regular' group.
    Keywords: Behavioral Sciences
    Type: Journal of sleep research (ISSN 0962-1105); 3; 4; 196-205
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: Using both previously published findings and entirely new data, we present evidence in support of the argument that the circadian dysfunction of advancing age in the healthy human is primarily one of failing to transduce the circadian signal from the circadian timing system (CTS) to rhythms "downstream" from the pacemaker rather than one of failing to generate the circadian signal itself. Two downstream rhythms are considered: subjective alertness and objective performance. For subjective alertness, we show that in both normal nychthemeral (24 h routine, sleeping at night) and unmasking (36 h of constant wakeful bed rest) conditions, advancing age, especially in men, leads to flattening of subjective alertness rhythms, even when circadian temperature rhythms are relatively robust. For objective performance, an unmasking experiment involving manual dexterity, visual search, and visual vigilance tasks was used to demonstrate that the relationship between temperature and performance is strong in the young, but not in older subjects (and especially not in older men).
    Keywords: Life Sciences (General)
    Type: Chronobiology international (ISSN 0742-0528); 17; 3; 355-68
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  • 8
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    In:  Other Sources
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: This brief review is concerned with how human performance efficiency changes as a function of time of day. It presents an overview of some of the research paradigms and conceptual models that have been used to investigate circadian performance rhythms. The influence of homeostatic and circadian processes on performance regulation is discussed. The review also briefly presents recent mathematical models of alertness that have been used to predict cognitive performance. Related topics such as interindividual differences and the postlunch dip are presented.
    Keywords: Life Sciences (General)
    Type: Chronobiology international (ISSN 0742-0528); 17; 6; 719-32
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: The effects of age and gender on sleep EEG power spectral density were assessed in a group of 100 subjects aged 20 to 60 years. We propose a new statistical strategy (mixed-model using fixed-knot regression splines) to analyze quantitative EEG measures. The effect of gender varied according to frequency, but no interactions emerged between age and gender, suggesting that the aging process does not differentially influence men and women. Women had higher power density than men in delta, theta, low alpha, and high spindle frequency range. The effect of age varied according to frequency and across the night. The decrease in power with age was not restricted to slow-wave activity, but also included theta and sigma activity. With increasing age, the attenuation over the night in power density between 1.25 and 8.00 Hz diminished, and the rise in power between 12.25 and 14.00 Hz across the night decreased. Increasing age was associated with higher power in the beta range. These results suggest that increasing age may be related to an attenuation of homeostatic sleep pressure and to an increase in cortical activation during sleep.
    Keywords: Life Sciences (General)
    Type: Psychophysiology (ISSN 0048-5772); 38; 2; 232-42
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: Increasingly, there is a need in both research and clinical practice to document and quantify sleep and waking behaviors in a comprehensive manner. The Pittsburgh Sleep Diary (PghSD) is an instrument with separate components to be completed at bedtime and waketime. Bedtime components relate to the events of the day preceding the sleep, waketime components to the sleep period just completed. Two-week PghSD data is presented from 234 different subjects, comprising 96 healthy young middle-aged controls, 37 older men, 44 older women, 29 young adult controls and 28 sleep disorders patients in order to demonstrate the usefulness, validity and reliability of various measures from the instrument. Comparisons are made with polysomnographic and actigraphic sleep measures, as well as personality and circadian type questionnaires. The instrument was shown to have sensitivity in detecting differences due to weekends, age, gender, personality and circadian type, and validity in agreeing with actigraphic estimates of sleep timing and quality. Over a 12-31 month delay, PghSD measures of both sleep timing and sleep quality showed correlations between 0.56 and 0.81 (n = 39, P 〈 0.001).
    Keywords: Life Sciences (General)
    Type: Journal of sleep research (ISSN 0962-1105); 3; 111-20
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