ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2008-11-15
    Description: Although in vitro observations suggest that cross-presentation of antigens is mediated primarily by CD8alpha+ dendritic cells, in vivo analysis has been hampered by the lack of systems that selectively eliminate this cell lineage. We show that deletion of the transcription factor Batf3 ablated development of CD8alpha+ dendritic cells, allowing us to examine their role in immunity in vivo. Dendritic cells from Batf3-/- mice were defective in cross-presentation, and Batf3-/- mice lacked virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses to West Nile virus. Importantly, rejection of highly immunogenic syngeneic tumors was impaired in Batf3-/- mice. These results suggest an important role for CD8alpha+ dendritic cells and cross-presentation in responses to viruses and in tumor rejection.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2756611/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2756611/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hildner, Kai -- Edelson, Brian T -- Purtha, Whitney E -- Diamond, Mark -- Matsushita, Hirokazu -- Kohyama, Masako -- Calderon, Boris -- Schraml, Barbara U -- Unanue, Emil R -- Diamond, Michael S -- Schreiber, Robert D -- Murphy, Theresa L -- Murphy, Kenneth M -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2008 Nov 14;322(5904):1097-100. doi: 10.1126/science.1164206.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19008445" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adoptive Transfer ; Animals ; Antibodies, Viral/blood ; Antigens, CD8/*analysis ; Basic-Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors/deficiency/genetics/*physiology ; CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology ; *Cross-Priming ; *Cytotoxicity, Immunologic ; Dendritic Cells/*immunology/transplantation ; Female ; Fibrosarcoma/immunology ; Lymphocyte Activation ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Repressor Proteins/genetics/*physiology ; Spleen/immunology ; T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic/*immunology ; West Nile Fever/immunology ; West Nile virus/immunology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2014-02-01
    Description: Although interferon (IFN) signaling induces genes that limit viral infection, many pathogenic viruses overcome this host response. As an example, 2'-O methylation of the 5' cap of viral RNA subverts mammalian antiviral responses by evading restriction of Ifit1, an IFN-stimulated gene that regulates protein synthesis. However, alphaviruses replicate efficiently in cells expressing Ifit1 even though their genomic RNA has a 5' cap lacking 2'-O methylation. We show that pathogenic alphaviruses use secondary structural motifs within the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of their RNA to alter Ifit1 binding and function. Mutations within the 5'-UTR affecting RNA structural elements enabled restriction by or antagonism of Ifit1 in vitro and in vivo. These results identify an evasion mechanism by which viruses use RNA structural motifs to avoid immune restriction.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4209899/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4209899/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hyde, Jennifer L -- Gardner, Christina L -- Kimura, Taishi -- White, James P -- Liu, Gai -- Trobaugh, Derek W -- Huang, Cheng -- Tonelli, Marco -- Paessler, Slobodan -- Takeda, Kiyoshi -- Klimstra, William B -- Amarasinghe, Gaya K -- Diamond, Michael S -- AI049820/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P41GM66326/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41RR02301/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI083383/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI104972/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI083019/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- UL1 TR000071/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/ -- UL1TR000071/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Feb 14;343(6172):783-7. doi: 10.1126/science.1248465. Epub 2014 Jan 30.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24482115" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: 5' Untranslated Regions/immunology ; Alphavirus/*pathogenicity/physiology ; Alphavirus Infections/*immunology/virology ; Animals ; Carrier Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors/genetics/immunology ; Host-Pathogen Interactions/*immunology ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mice, Mutant Strains ; Mutation ; Nucleic Acid Conformation ; RNA Caps/*chemistry/*immunology ; RNA, Viral/*chemistry/*immunology ; Virus Replication
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2014-11-29
    Description: Norovirus gastroenteritis is a major public health burden worldwide. Although fecal shedding is important for transmission of enteric viruses, little is known about the immune factors that restrict persistent enteric infection. We report here that although the cytokines interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) and IFN-beta prevented the systemic spread of murine norovirus (MNoV), only IFN-lambda controlled persistent enteric infection. Infection-dependent induction of IFN-lambda was governed by the MNoV capsid protein and correlated with diminished enteric persistence. Treatment of established infection with IFN-lambda cured mice in a manner requiring nonhematopoietic cell expression of the IFN-lambda receptor, Ifnlr1, and independent of adaptive immunity. These results suggest the therapeutic potential of IFN-lambda for curing virus infections in the gastrointestinal tract.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4398891/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4398891/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Nice, Timothy J -- Baldridge, Megan T -- McCune, Broc T -- Norman, Jason M -- Lazear, Helen M -- Artyomov, Maxim -- Diamond, Michael S -- Virgin, Herbert W -- 5T32A100716334/PHS HHS/ -- 5T32AI007163/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- 5T32CA009547/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- F31 CA177194/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- F31CA177194-01/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI084887/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 AI007163/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 CA009547/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI083019/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI106772/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI109725/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jan 16;347(6219):269-73. doi: 10.1126/science.1258100. Epub 2014 Nov 27.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. ; Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. ; Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. ; Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. virgin@wustl.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25431489" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptive Immunity ; Animals ; Caliciviridae Infections/*drug therapy/*immunology/virology ; Capsid Proteins/immunology/metabolism ; Cells, Cultured ; Cytokines/biosynthesis/*immunology/*therapeutic use ; Feces/virology ; Gastroenteritis/drug therapy/*immunology/virology ; Immunity, Innate ; Interferon-alpha/biosynthesis/immunology ; Interferon-beta/biosynthesis/immunology ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Norovirus/*immunology/*physiology ; Virus Replication ; Virus Shedding
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2015-07-15
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Schoggins, John W -- MacDuff, Donna A -- Imanaka, Naoko -- Gainey, Maria D -- Shrestha, Bimmi -- Eitson, Jennifer L -- Mar, Katrina B -- Richardson, R Blake -- Ratushny, Alexander V -- Litvak, Vladimir -- Dabelic, Rea -- Manicassamy, Balaji -- Aitchison, John D -- Aderem, Alan -- Elliott, Richard M -- Garcia-Sastre, Adolfo -- Racaniello, Vincent -- Snijder, Eric J -- Yokoyama, Wayne M -- Diamond, Michael S -- Virgin, Herbert W -- Rice, Charles M -- K01 DK095031/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R00 AI095320/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI032972/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI091707/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI102597/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI104972/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Sep 3;525(7567):144. doi: 10.1038/nature14555. Epub 2015 Jul 8.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26153856" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2010-11-19
    Description: Cellular messenger RNA (mRNA) of higher eukaryotes and many viral RNAs are methylated at the N-7 and 2'-O positions of the 5' guanosine cap by specific nuclear and cytoplasmic methyltransferases (MTases), respectively. Whereas N-7 methylation is essential for RNA translation and stability, the function of 2'-O methylation has remained uncertain since its discovery 35 years ago. Here we show that a West Nile virus (WNV) mutant (E218A) that lacks 2'-O MTase activity was attenuated in wild-type primary cells and mice but was pathogenic in the absence of type I interferon (IFN) signalling. 2'-O methylation of viral RNA did not affect IFN induction in WNV-infected fibroblasts but instead modulated the antiviral effects of IFN-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFIT), which are interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) implicated in regulation of protein translation. Poxvirus and coronavirus mutants that lacked 2'-O MTase activity similarly showed enhanced sensitivity to the antiviral actions of IFN and, specifically, IFIT proteins. Our results demonstrate that the 2'-O methylation of the 5' cap of viral RNA functions to subvert innate host antiviral responses through escape of IFIT-mediated suppression, and suggest an evolutionary explanation for 2'-O methylation of cellular mRNA: to distinguish self from non-self RNA. Differential methylation of cytoplasmic RNA probably serves as an example for pattern recognition and restriction of propagation of foreign viral RNA in host cells.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3058805/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3058805/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Daffis, Stephane -- Szretter, Kristy J -- Schriewer, Jill -- Li, Jianqing -- Youn, Soonjeon -- Errett, John -- Lin, Tsai-Yu -- Schneller, Stewart -- Zust, Roland -- Dong, Hongping -- Thiel, Volker -- Sen, Ganes C -- Fensterl, Volker -- Klimstra, William B -- Pierson, Theodore C -- Buller, R Mark -- Gale, Michael Jr -- Shi, Pei-Yong -- Diamond, Michael S -- R01 AI074973/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI56540/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA068782/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA068782-24/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI083019/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U54 AI057158/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U54 AI057160/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U54 AI057160-06/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U54 AI081680/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U54 AI081680-01/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2010 Nov 18;468(7322):452-6. doi: 10.1038/nature09489.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21085181" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: 3T3 Cells ; Animals ; Carrier Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Cells, Cultured ; Coronavirus/enzymology/genetics/immunology/physiology ; Fibroblasts ; Gene Expression Regulation/genetics/*immunology ; Humans ; Immunity, Innate/genetics/*immunology ; Interferons/deficiency/genetics/*immunology ; Methylation ; Methyltransferases/metabolism ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Models, Genetic ; Models, Immunological ; Neoplasm Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Poxviridae/enzymology/genetics/immunology/physiology ; Protein Biosynthesis/immunology ; Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; RNA Caps/genetics/immunology/*metabolism ; RNA, Viral/genetics/immunology/*metabolism ; Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta/deficiency/genetics ; Survival Rate ; Virus Replication ; West Nile virus/enzymology/genetics/immunology/physiology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2013-11-29
    Description: The type I interferon (IFN) response protects cells from viral infection by inducing hundreds of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), some of which encode direct antiviral effectors. Recent screening studies have begun to catalogue ISGs with antiviral activity against several RNA and DNA viruses. However, antiviral ISG specificity across multiple distinct classes of viruses remains largely unexplored. Here we used an ectopic expression assay to screen a library of more than 350 human ISGs for effects on 14 viruses representing 7 families and 11 genera. We show that 47 genes inhibit one or more viruses, and 25 genes enhance virus infectivity. Comparative analysis reveals that the screened ISGs target positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses more effectively than negative-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. Gene clustering highlights the cytosolic DNA sensor cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS, also known as MB21D1) as a gene whose expression also broadly inhibits several RNA viruses. In vitro, lentiviral delivery of enzymatically active cGAS triggers a STING-dependent, IRF3-mediated antiviral program that functions independently of canonical IFN/STAT1 signalling. In vivo, genetic ablation of murine cGAS reveals its requirement in the antiviral response to two DNA viruses, and an unappreciated contribution to the innate control of an RNA virus. These studies uncover new paradigms for the preferential specificity of IFN-mediated antiviral pathways spanning several virus families.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4077721/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4077721/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Schoggins, John W -- MacDuff, Donna A -- Imanaka, Naoko -- Gainey, Maria D -- Shrestha, Bimmi -- Eitson, Jennifer L -- Mar, Katrina B -- Richardson, R Blake -- Ratushny, Alexander V -- Litvak, Vladimir -- Dabelic, Rea -- Manicassamy, Balaji -- Aitchison, John D -- Aderem, Alan -- Elliott, Richard M -- Garcia-Sastre, Adolfo -- Racaniello, Vincent -- Snijder, Eric J -- Yokoyama, Wayne M -- Diamond, Michael S -- Virgin, Herbert W -- Rice, Charles M -- 099220/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- AI057158/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI057160/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI083025/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI091707/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI095611/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI104972/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- DK095031/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- G0801822/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- GM076547/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM103511/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- HHSN266200700010C/PHS HHS/ -- HHSN272200900041CU19/CU/CSP VA/ -- K01 DK095031/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R00 AI095320/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI032972/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI091707/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI102597/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI104972/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 AI005284/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 AR007279/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jan 30;505(7485):691-5. doi: 10.1038/nature12862. Epub 2013 Nov 27.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Laboratory of Virology and Infectious Disease, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10065, USA [2] Department of Microbiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA (J.W.S.); MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, Scotland G61 1QH, UK (R.M.E.). ; Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA. ; Laboratory of Virology and Infectious Disease, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Rheumatology Division, Department of Medicine, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA. ; Infectious Diseases Division, Department of Medicine and Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA. ; Department of Microbiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA. ; 1] Seattle Biomedical Research Institute, Seattle, Washington 98109, USA [2] Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, Washington 98109, USA. ; Seattle Biomedical Research Institute, Seattle, Washington 98109, USA. ; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA. ; Department of Microbiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA. ; 1] School of Biology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Scotland KY16 9ST, UK [2] Department of Microbiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA (J.W.S.); MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, Scotland G61 1QH, UK (R.M.E.). ; 1] Department of Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York 10029, USA [2] Global Health and Emerging Pathogens Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York 10029, USA [3] Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York 10029, USA. ; Department of Medical Microbiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden 2300 RC, The Netherlands. ; 1] Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA [2] Infectious Diseases Division, Department of Medicine and Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24284630" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cluster Analysis ; DNA Viruses/immunology/pathogenicity ; Flow Cytometry ; Gene Library ; Immunity, Innate/*genetics/*immunology ; Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/immunology/metabolism ; Interferons/*immunology/metabolism ; Membrane Proteins/metabolism ; Mice ; Mice, Knockout ; Nucleotidyltransferases/deficiency/genetics/*immunology/*metabolism ; RNA Viruses/immunology/pathogenicity ; STAT1 Transcription Factor/metabolism ; Substrate Specificity ; Viruses/classification/*immunology/pathogenicity
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2014-11-29
    Description: The capacity of human norovirus (NoV), which causes 〉90% of global epidemic nonbacterial gastroenteritis, to infect a subset of people persistently may contribute to its spread. How such enteric viruses establish persistent infections is not well understood. We found that antibiotics prevented persistent murine norovirus (MNoV) infection, an effect that was reversed by replenishment of the bacterial microbiota. Antibiotics did not prevent tissue infection or affect systemic viral replication but acted specifically in the intestine. The receptor for the antiviral cytokine interferon-lambda, Ifnlr1, as well as the transcription factors Stat1 and Irf3, were required for antibiotics to prevent viral persistence. Thus, the bacterial microbiome fosters enteric viral persistence in a manner counteracted by specific components of the innate immune system.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4409937/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4409937/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Baldridge, Megan T -- Nice, Timothy J -- McCune, Broc T -- Yokoyama, Christine C -- Kambal, Amal -- Wheadon, Michael -- Diamond, Michael S -- Ivanova, Yulia -- Artyomov, Maxim -- Virgin, Herbert W -- 1F31CA177194/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 5T32AI007163/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- 5T32CA009547/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- F31 CA177194/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI084887/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 AI007163/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 CA009547/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI083019/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI106772/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI109725/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jan 16;347(6219):266-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1258025. Epub 2014 Nov 27.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. ; Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Departments of Medicine and Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. ; Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. virgin@wustl.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25431490" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology ; Caliciviridae Infections/drug therapy/immunology/microbiology/*virology ; Cytokines/*physiology ; Female ; Gastroenteritis/drug therapy/immunology/microbiology/*virology ; Intestines/*microbiology/virology ; Male ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mice, Knockout ; *Microbiota/drug effects ; Norovirus/immunology/*physiology ; Receptors, Cytokine/genetics/metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; *Symbiosis ; Viral Load ; Virus Replication ; Virus Shedding
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2014-03-19
    Description: The Flavivirus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is a conserved, membrane-associated and secreted glycoprotein with replication and immune evasion functions. Secreted NS1 is a hexameric, barrel-shaped lipoprotein that can bind back to the plasma membrane of cells. Antibodies targeting cell surface-associated NS1 can be protective in vivo in a manner dependent...
    Print ISSN: 0027-8424
    Electronic ISSN: 1091-6490
    Topics: Biology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2015-11-11
    Description: Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes severe acute and chronic disease in humans. Although highly inhibitory murine and human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been generated, the structural basis of their neutralizing activity remains poorly characterized. Here, we determined the cryo-EM structures of chikungunya virus-like particles complexed with...
    Print ISSN: 0027-8424
    Electronic ISSN: 1091-6490
    Topics: Biology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2014-11-27
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...