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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2005-08-06
    Description: Bacterial microcompartments are primitive organelles composed entirely of protein subunits. Genomic sequence databases reveal the widespread occurrence of microcompartments across diverse microbes. The prototypical bacterial microcompartment is the carboxysome, a protein shell for sequestering carbon fixation reactions. We report three-dimensional crystal structures of multiple carboxysome shell proteins, revealing a hexameric unit as the basic microcompartment building block and showing how these hexamers assemble to form flat facets of the polyhedral shell. The structures suggest how molecular transport across the shell may be controlled and how structural variations might govern the assembly and architecture of these subcellular compartments.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kerfeld, Cheryl A -- Sawaya, Michael R -- Tanaka, Shiho -- Nguyen, Chau V -- Phillips, Martin -- Beeby, Morgan -- Yeates, Todd O -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2005 Aug 5;309(5736):936-8.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Box 951570, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16081736" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Bacterial Proteins/*chemistry ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Organelles/*chemistry ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Sequence Alignment ; Synechocystis/*chemistry/ultrastructure
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 1994-06-24
    Description: Structures of the 31-kilodalton catalytic domain of rat DNA polymerase beta (pol beta) and the whole 39-kilodalton enzyme were determined at 2.3 and 3.6 angstrom resolution, respectively. The 31-kilodalton domain is composed of fingers, palm, and thumb subdomains arranged to form a DNA binding channel reminiscent of the polymerase domains of the Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I, HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, and bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. The amino-terminal 8-kilodalton domain is attached to the fingers subdomain by a flexible hinge. The two invariant aspartates found in all polymerase sequences and implicated in catalytic activity have the same geometric arrangement within structurally similar but topologically distinct palms, indicating that the polymerases have maintained, or possibly re-evolved, a common nucleotidyl transfer mechanism. The location of Mn2+ and deoxyadenosine triphosphate in pol beta confirms the role of the invariant aspartates in metal ion and deoxynucleoside triphosphate binding.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Sawaya, M R -- Pelletier, H -- Kumar, A -- Wilson, S H -- Kraut, J -- CA17374/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- ES06839/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- GM10928/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1994 Jun 24;264(5167):1930-5.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Chemistry, University of California, San Diego 92093-0317.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7516581" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Binding Sites ; Cloning, Molecular ; Crystallization ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; DNA/metabolism ; DNA Polymerase I/*chemistry/metabolism ; DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases/chemistry/metabolism ; Deoxyadenine Nucleotides/chemistry/metabolism ; Deoxycytosine Nucleotides/chemistry/metabolism ; Dideoxynucleotides ; HIV Reverse Transcriptase ; Protein Folding ; Protein Structure, Secondary ; RNA-Directed DNA Polymerase/chemistry/metabolism ; Rats ; Recombinant Proteins/chemistry ; Viral Proteins
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 1994-06-24
    Description: Two ternary complexes of rat DNA polymerase beta (pol beta), a DNA template-primer, and dideoxycytidine triphosphate (ddCTP) have been determined at 2.9 A and 3.6 A resolution, respectively. ddCTP is the triphosphate of dideoxycytidine (ddC), a nucleoside analog that targets the reverse transcriptase of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and is at present used to treat AIDS. Although crystals of the two complexes belong to different space groups, the structures are similar, suggesting that the polymerase-DNA-ddCTP interactions are not affected by crystal packing forces. In the pol beta active site, the attacking 3'-OH of the elongating primer, the ddCTP phosphates, and two Mg2+ ions are all clustered around Asp190, Asp192, and Asp256. Two of these residues, Asp190 and Asp256, are present in the amino acid sequences of all polymerases so far studied and are also spatially similar in the four polymerases--the Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I, HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, T7 RNA polymerase, and rat DNA pol beta--whose crystal structures are now known. A two-metal ion mechanism is described for the nucleotidyl transfer reaction and may apply to all polymerases. In the ternary complex structures analyzed, pol beta binds to the DNA template-primer in a different manner from that recently proposed for other polymerase-DNA models.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Pelletier, H -- Sawaya, M R -- Kumar, A -- Wilson, S H -- Kraut, J -- CA17374/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- ES06839/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- GM10928/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1994 Jun 24;264(5167):1891-903.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Chemistry, University of California, San Diego 92093-0317.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7516580" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Base Sequence ; Binding Sites ; Crystallization ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; DNA/chemistry/metabolism ; DNA Polymerase I/*chemistry/metabolism ; DNA Primers/*chemistry/metabolism ; DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases/chemistry/metabolism ; Deoxycytosine Nucleotides/*chemistry/metabolism ; Dideoxynucleotides ; HIV Reverse Transcriptase ; Humans ; Hydrogen Bonding ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; RNA-Directed DNA Polymerase/chemistry/metabolism ; Rats ; Recombinant Proteins ; Templates, Genetic ; Thymine Nucleotides/chemistry/metabolism ; Viral Proteins ; Zidovudine/analogs & derivatives/chemistry/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2006-01-28
    Description: The postsynaptic density (PSD) is a complex assembly of proteins associated with the postsynaptic membrane that organizes neurotransmitter receptors, signaling pathways, and regulatory elements within a cytoskeletal matrix. Here we show that the sterile alpha motif domain of rat Shank3/ProSAP2, a master scaffolding protein located deep within the PSD, can form large sheets composed of helical fibers stacked side by side. Zn2+, which is found in high concentrations in the PSD, binds tightly to Shank3 and may regulate assembly. Sheets of the Shank protein could form a platform for the construction of the PSD complex.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Baron, Marisa K -- Boeckers, Tobias M -- Vaida, Bianca -- Faham, Salem -- Gingery, Mari -- Sawaya, Michael R -- Salyer, Danielle -- Gundelfinger, Eckart D -- Bowie, James U -- R01 CA081000/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM063919/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM063919-07/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM063919-08/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM075922/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM075922-04/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2006 Jan 27;311(5760):531-5.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, 611 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16439662" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/analysis/*chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; Animals ; Binding Sites ; Crystallization ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Hippocampus/chemistry ; Microscopy, Electron ; Models, Molecular ; Mutation ; Nerve Tissue Proteins ; Neurons/chemistry ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Folding ; Protein Structure, Quaternary ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Protein Subunits/chemistry ; Rats ; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/analysis ; Solubility ; Synapses/*chemistry ; Zinc/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2015-09-10
    Description: The protein alpha-synuclein is the main component of Lewy bodies, the neuron-associated aggregates seen in Parkinson disease and other neurodegenerative pathologies. An 11-residue segment, which we term NACore, appears to be responsible for amyloid formation and cytotoxicity of human alpha-synuclein. Here we describe crystals of NACore that have dimensions smaller than the wavelength of visible light and thus are invisible by optical microscopy. As the crystals are thousands of times too small for structure determination by synchrotron X-ray diffraction, we use micro-electron diffraction to determine the structure at atomic resolution. The 1.4 A resolution structure demonstrates that this method can determine previously unknown protein structures and here yields, to our knowledge, the highest resolution achieved by any cryo-electron microscopy method to date. The structure exhibits protofibrils built of pairs of face-to-face beta-sheets. X-ray fibre diffraction patterns show the similarity of NACore to toxic fibrils of full-length alpha-synuclein. The NACore structure, together with that of a second segment, inspires a model for most of the ordered portion of the toxic, full-length alpha-synuclein fibril, presenting opportunities for the design of inhibitors of alpha-synuclein fibrils.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Rodriguez, Jose A -- Ivanova, Magdalena I -- Sawaya, Michael R -- Cascio, Duilio -- Reyes, Francis E -- Shi, Dan -- Sangwan, Smriti -- Guenther, Elizabeth L -- Johnson, Lisa M -- Zhang, Meng -- Jiang, Lin -- Arbing, Mark A -- Nannenga, Brent L -- Hattne, Johan -- Whitelegge, Julian -- Brewster, Aaron S -- Messerschmidt, Marc -- Boutet, Sebastien -- Sauter, Nicholas K -- Gonen, Tamir -- Eisenberg, David S -- 1R01-AG029430/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- AG016570/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- GM095887/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM102520/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41 GM103403/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM095887/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM102520/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Sep 24;525(7570):486-90. doi: 10.1038/nature15368. Epub 2015 Sep 9.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Howard Hughes Medical Institute, UCLA-DOE Institute, Departments of Biological Chemistry and Chemistry and Biochemistry, Box 951570, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095-1570, USA. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Janelia Research Campus, 19700 Helix Drive, Ashburn, Virginia 20147, USA. ; Box 42, NPI-Semel Institute, 760 Westwood Plaza, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90024, USA. ; Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA. ; Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26352473" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amyloid/chemistry ; Cryoelectron Microscopy ; Electrons ; Humans ; Lewy Bodies/chemistry ; Models, Molecular ; Nanoparticles/*chemistry/*toxicity ; Parkinson Disease ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Scattering, Radiation ; alpha-Synuclein/*chemistry/*toxicity
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2008-02-23
    Description: The carboxysome is a bacterial microcompartment that functions as a simple organelle by sequestering enzymes involved in carbon fixation. The carboxysome shell is roughly 800 to 1400 angstroms in diameter and is assembled from several thousand protein subunits. Previous studies have revealed the three-dimensional structures of hexameric carboxysome shell proteins, which self-assemble into molecular layers that most likely constitute the facets of the polyhedral shell. Here, we report the three-dimensional structures of two proteins of previously unknown function, CcmL and OrfA (or CsoS4A), from the two known classes of carboxysomes, at resolutions of 2.4 and 2.15 angstroms. Both proteins assemble to form pentameric structures whose size and shape are compatible with formation of vertices in an icosahedral shell. Combining these pentamers with the hexamers previously elucidated gives two plausible, preliminary atomic models for the carboxysome shell.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Tanaka, Shiho -- Kerfeld, Cheryl A -- Sawaya, Michael R -- Cai, Fei -- Heinhorst, Sabine -- Cannon, Gordon C -- Yeates, Todd O -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2008 Feb 22;319(5866):1083-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1151458.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18292340" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Bacterial Proteins/*chemistry/physiology ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Cytoplasmic Structures/*chemistry/ultrastructure ; Models, Molecular ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Folding ; Protein Structure, Quaternary ; Synechocystis/*chemistry/ultrastructure
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2009-06-23
    Description: Amyloids are highly organized cross-beta-sheet-rich protein or peptide aggregates that are associated with pathological conditions including Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. However, amyloids may also have a normal biological function, as demonstrated by fungal prions, which are involved in prion replication, and the amyloid protein Pmel17, which is involved in mammalian skin pigmentation. We found that peptide and protein hormones in secretory granules of the endocrine system are stored in an amyloid-like cross-beta-sheet-rich conformation. Thus, functional amyloids in the pituitary and other organs can contribute to normal cell and tissue physiology.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2865899/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2865899/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Maji, Samir K -- Perrin, Marilyn H -- Sawaya, Michael R -- Jessberger, Sebastian -- Vadodaria, Krishna -- Rissman, Robert A -- Singru, Praful S -- Nilsson, K Peter R -- Simon, Rozalyn -- Schubert, David -- Eisenberg, David -- Rivier, Jean -- Sawchenko, Paul -- Vale, Wylie -- Riek, Roland -- P01 DK026741/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P01 DK026741-29/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P01 DK026741-30/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2009 Jul 17;325(5938):328-32. doi: 10.1126/science.1173155. Epub 2009 Jun 18.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, Eidgenossische Technische Hochschule (ETH) Zurich, Wolfgang-Paulistrasse 10, CH-8093 Zurich, Switzerland.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19541956" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adrenocorticotropic Hormone/chemistry/metabolism ; Amyloid/*chemistry/metabolism ; Animals ; Cell Survival ; Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone/chemistry/metabolism ; Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/chemistry ; Humans ; Hydrogen-Ion Concentration ; Mice ; Neurons/cytology/physiology ; Peptide Hormones/*chemistry/metabolism ; Pituitary Gland/*chemistry ; Pituitary Gland, Anterior/chemistry/metabolism ; Pituitary Gland, Posterior/chemistry/metabolism ; Pituitary Hormones/*chemistry/metabolism ; Protein Conformation ; Rats ; Secretory Vesicles/*chemistry/metabolism ; Sheep ; Urocortins/chemistry/metabolism ; beta-Endorphin/chemistry/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2010-01-02
    Description: Many bacterial cells contain proteinaceous microcompartments that act as simple organelles by sequestering specific metabolic processes involving volatile or toxic metabolites. Here we report the three-dimensional (3D) crystal structures, with resolutions between 1.65 and 2.5 angstroms, of the four homologous proteins (EutS, EutL, EutK, and EutM) that are thought to be the major shell constituents of a functionally complex ethanolamine utilization (Eut) microcompartment. The Eut microcompartment is used to sequester the metabolism of ethanolamine in bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. The four Eut shell proteins share an overall similar 3D fold, but they have distinguishing structural features that help explain the specific roles they play in the microcompartment. For example, EutL undergoes a conformational change that is probably involved in gating molecular transport through shell protein pores, whereas structural evidence suggests that EutK might bind a nucleic acid component. Together these structures give mechanistic insight into bacterial microcompartments.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Tanaka, Shiho -- Sawaya, Michael R -- Yeates, Todd O -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2010 Jan 1;327(5961):81-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1179513.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California Los Angeles, 611 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20044574" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; *Cell Compartmentation ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Escherichia coli K12/*chemistry/*metabolism/ultrastructure ; Escherichia coli Proteins/*chemistry/metabolism ; Ethanolamine/*metabolism ; Metabolic Networks and Pathways ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Polyproteins/*chemistry/metabolism ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Folding ; Protein Structure, Quaternary ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Protein Subunits/chemistry/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2012-03-10
    Description: Amyloid diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and the prion conditions, are each associated with a particular protein in fibrillar form. These amyloid fibrils were long suspected to be the disease agents, but evidence suggests that smaller, often transient and polymorphic oligomers are the toxic entities. Here, we identify a segment of the amyloid-forming protein alphaB crystallin, which forms an oligomeric complex exhibiting properties of other amyloid oligomers: beta-sheet-rich structure, cytotoxicity, and recognition by an oligomer-specific antibody. The x-ray-derived atomic structure of the oligomer reveals a cylindrical barrel, formed from six antiparallel protein strands, that we term a cylindrin. The cylindrin structure is compatible with a sequence segment from the beta-amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease. Cylindrins offer models for the hitherto elusive structures of amyloid oligomers.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3959867/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3959867/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Laganowsky, Arthur -- Liu, Cong -- Sawaya, Michael R -- Whitelegge, Julian P -- Park, Jiyong -- Zhao, Minglei -- Pensalfini, Anna -- Soriaga, Angela B -- Landau, Meytal -- Teng, Poh K -- Cascio, Duilio -- Glabe, Charles -- Eisenberg, David -- 016570/PHS HHS/ -- 1R01-AG029430/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- 5T32GM008496/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 AG016570/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG029430/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG033069/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- RR-15301/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Mar 9;335(6073):1228-31. doi: 10.1126/science.1213151.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biological Chemistry, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22403391" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Amyloid/*chemistry/immunology ; Amyloid beta-Peptides/chemistry ; Antibodies/immunology ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Hydrogen Bonding ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Dynamics Simulation ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Peptide Fragments/*chemistry/immunology ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Recombinant Proteins/chemistry ; alpha-Crystallin B Chain/*chemistry/immunology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2012-06-02
    Description: We describe a general computational method for designing proteins that self-assemble to a desired symmetric architecture. Protein building blocks are docked together symmetrically to identify complementary packing arrangements, and low-energy protein-protein interfaces are then designed between the building blocks in order to drive self-assembly. We used trimeric protein building blocks to design a 24-subunit, 13-nm diameter complex with octahedral symmetry and a 12-subunit, 11-nm diameter complex with tetrahedral symmetry. The designed proteins assembled to the desired oligomeric states in solution, and the crystal structures of the complexes revealed that the resulting materials closely match the design models. The method can be used to design a wide variety of self-assembling protein nanomaterials.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4138882/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4138882/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉King, Neil P -- Sheffler, William -- Sawaya, Michael R -- Vollmar, Breanna S -- Sumida, John P -- Andre, Ingemar -- Gonen, Tamir -- Yeates, Todd O -- Baker, David -- RR-15301/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Jun 1;336(6085):1171-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1219364.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22654060" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Chromatography, Gel ; Cloning, Molecular ; Computational Biology ; Computer Simulation ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Escherichia coli/genetics/metabolism ; Hydrogen Bonding ; Microscopy, Electron ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Weight ; Mutation ; *Nanostructures ; *Protein Engineering ; *Protein Multimerization ; Protein Structure, Secondary ; Protein Subunits/*chemistry/genetics ; Proteins/*chemistry/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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