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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2015-02-20
    Description: The reference human genome sequence set the stage for studies of genetic variation and its association with human disease, but epigenomic studies lack a similar reference. To address this need, the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Consortium generated the largest collection so far of human epigenomes for primary cells and tissues. Here we describe the integrative analysis of 111 reference human epigenomes generated as part of the programme, profiled for histone modification patterns, DNA accessibility, DNA methylation and RNA expression. We establish global maps of regulatory elements, define regulatory modules of coordinated activity, and their likely activators and repressors. We show that disease- and trait-associated genetic variants are enriched in tissue-specific epigenomic marks, revealing biologically relevant cell types for diverse human traits, and providing a resource for interpreting the molecular basis of human disease. Our results demonstrate the central role of epigenomic information for understanding gene regulation, cellular differentiation and human disease.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4530010/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4530010/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Roadmap Epigenomics Consortium -- Kundaje, Anshul -- Meuleman, Wouter -- Ernst, Jason -- Bilenky, Misha -- Yen, Angela -- Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza -- Kheradpour, Pouya -- Zhang, Zhizhuo -- Wang, Jianrong -- Ziller, Michael J -- Amin, Viren -- Whitaker, John W -- Schultz, Matthew D -- Ward, Lucas D -- Sarkar, Abhishek -- Quon, Gerald -- Sandstrom, Richard S -- Eaton, Matthew L -- Wu, Yi-Chieh -- Pfenning, Andreas R -- Wang, Xinchen -- Claussnitzer, Melina -- Liu, Yaping -- Coarfa, Cristian -- Harris, R Alan -- Shoresh, Noam -- Epstein, Charles B -- Gjoneska, Elizabeta -- Leung, Danny -- Xie, Wei -- Hawkins, R David -- Lister, Ryan -- Hong, Chibo -- Gascard, Philippe -- Mungall, Andrew J -- Moore, Richard -- Chuah, Eric -- Tam, Angela -- Canfield, Theresa K -- Hansen, R Scott -- Kaul, Rajinder -- Sabo, Peter J -- Bansal, Mukul S -- Carles, Annaick -- Dixon, Jesse R -- Farh, Kai-How -- Feizi, Soheil -- Karlic, Rosa -- Kim, Ah-Ram -- Kulkarni, Ashwinikumar -- Li, Daofeng -- Lowdon, Rebecca -- Elliott, GiNell -- Mercer, Tim R -- Neph, Shane J -- Onuchic, Vitor -- Polak, Paz -- Rajagopal, Nisha -- Ray, Pradipta -- Sallari, Richard C -- Siebenthall, Kyle T -- Sinnott-Armstrong, Nicholas A -- Stevens, Michael -- Thurman, Robert E -- Wu, Jie -- Zhang, Bo -- Zhou, Xin -- Beaudet, Arthur E -- Boyer, Laurie A -- De Jager, Philip L -- Farnham, Peggy J -- Fisher, Susan J -- Haussler, David -- Jones, Steven J M -- Li, Wei -- Marra, Marco A -- McManus, Michael T -- Sunyaev, Shamil -- Thomson, James A -- Tlsty, Thea D -- Tsai, Li-Huei -- Wang, Wei -- Waterland, Robert A -- Zhang, Michael Q -- Chadwick, Lisa H -- Bernstein, Bradley E -- Costello, Joseph F -- Ecker, Joseph R -- Hirst, Martin -- Meissner, Alexander -- Milosavljevic, Aleksandar -- Ren, Bing -- Stamatoyannopoulos, John A -- Wang, Ting -- Kellis, Manolis -- 5R24HD000836/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- ES017166/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- F32 HL110473/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- F32HL110473/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- K99 HL119617/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- K99HL119617/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- P01 DA008227/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- P30AG10161/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- P50 MH096890/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG015819/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG017917/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 ES024984/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- R01 ES024992/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG004037/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG007175/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG007354/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01AG15819/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01AG17917/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01HG004037/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01HG004037-S1/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01NS078839/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- RC1HG005334/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- RF1 AG015819/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- T32 ES007032/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007198/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007266/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM081739/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U01 ES017154/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- U01AG46152/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- U01DA025956/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- U01ES017154/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- U01ES017155/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- U01ES017156/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- U01ES017166/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Feb 19;518(7539):317-30. doi: 10.1038/nature14248.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 32 Vassar St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. [2] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [3] Department of Genetics, Department of Computer Science, 300 Pasteur Dr., Lane Building, L301, Stanford, California 94305-5120, USA. ; 1] Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 32 Vassar St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. [2] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; 1] Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 32 Vassar St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. [2] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [3] Department of Biological Chemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, 615 Charles E Young Dr South, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. ; Canada's Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada. ; 1] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [2] Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, 7 Divinity Ave, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA. ; Epigenome Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Institute of Genomic Medicine, Moores Cancer Center, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Genomic Analysis Laboratory, Howard Hughes Medical Institute &The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 N. Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, 3720 15th Ave. NE, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. ; 1] Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 32 Vassar St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. [2] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [3] Biology Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 31 Ames St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; 1] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [2] The Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 43 Vassar St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. ; 1] Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Institute of Genomic Medicine, Moores Cancer Center, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. [2] Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Department of Neurosurgery, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, 1450 3rd Street, San Francisco, California 94158, USA. ; Department of Pathology, University of California San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, California 94143-0511, USA. ; Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Genetics, University of Washington, 2211 Elliot Avenue, Seattle, Washington 98121, USA. ; 1] Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 32 Vassar St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. [2] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [3] Department of Computer Science &Engineering, University of Connecticut, 371 Fairfield Way, Storrs, Connecticut 06269, USA. ; Department of Microbiology and Immunology and Centre for High-Throughput Biology, University of British Columbia, 2125 East Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4, Canada. ; Bioinformatics Group, Department of Molecular Biology, Division of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Horvatovac 102a, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia. ; Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Center for Systems Biology, The University of Texas, Dallas, NSERL, RL10, 800 W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080, USA. ; Department of Genetics, Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University in St Louis, 4444 Forest Park Ave, St Louis, Missouri 63108, USA. ; Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia. ; 1] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [2] Brigham &Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; 1] Department of Genetics, Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University in St Louis, 4444 Forest Park Ave, St Louis, Missouri 63108, USA. [2] Department of Computer Science and Engineeering, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63130, USA. ; 1] Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3600, USA. [2] Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 11724, USA. ; Molecular and Human Genetics Department, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Biology Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 31 Ames St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; 1] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [2] Brigham &Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. [3] Harvard Medical School, 25 Shattuck St, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Department of Biochemistry, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, 1450 Biggy Street, Los Angeles, California 90089-9601, USA. ; ObGyn, Reproductive Sciences, University of California San Francisco, 35 Medical Center Way, San Francisco, California 94143, USA. ; Center for Biomolecular Sciences and Engineering, University of Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA. ; 1] Canada's Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada. [2] Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6, Canada. [3] Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, 2329 West Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada, V6T 1Z4. ; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] Canada's Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada. [2] Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, 2329 West Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada, V6T 1Z4. ; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Diabetes Center, University of California, San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Ave, San Francisco, California 94143-0534, USA. ; 1] University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53715, USA. [2] Morgridge Institute for Research, 330 N. Orchard Street, Madison, Wisconsin 53707, USA. ; USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center, Baylor College of Medicine, 1100 Bates Street, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Center for Systems Biology, The University of Texas, Dallas, NSERL, RL10, 800 W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080, USA. [2] Bioinformatics Division, Center for Synthetic and Systems Biology, TNLIST, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 111 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709, USA. ; 1] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [2] Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit St, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. [3] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, 4000 Jones Bridge Road, Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815-6789, USA. ; 1] Canada's Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada. [2] Department of Microbiology and Immunology and Centre for High-Throughput Biology, University of British Columbia, 2125 East Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4, Canada.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25693563" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Base Sequence ; Cell Lineage/genetics ; Cells, Cultured ; Chromatin/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; Chromosomes, Human/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; DNA/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; DNA Methylation ; Datasets as Topic ; Enhancer Elements, Genetic/genetics ; Epigenesis, Genetic/*genetics ; *Epigenomics ; Genetic Variation/genetics ; Genome, Human/*genetics ; Genome-Wide Association Study ; Histones/metabolism ; Humans ; Organ Specificity/genetics ; RNA/genetics ; Reference Values
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2015-06-02
    Description: Understanding the diversity of human tissues is fundamental to disease and requires linking genetic information, which is identical in most of an individual's cells, with epigenetic mechanisms that could have tissue-specific roles. Surveys of DNA methylation in human tissues have established a complex landscape including both tissue-specific and invariant methylation patterns. Here we report high coverage methylomes that catalogue cytosine methylation in all contexts for the major human organ systems, integrated with matched transcriptomes and genomic sequence. By combining these diverse data types with each individuals' phased genome, we identified widespread tissue-specific differential CG methylation (mCG), partially methylated domains, allele-specific methylation and transcription, and the unexpected presence of non-CG methylation (mCH) in almost all human tissues. mCH correlated with tissue-specific functions, and using this mark, we made novel predictions of genes that escape X-chromosome inactivation in specific tissues. Overall, DNA methylation in several genomic contexts varies substantially among human tissues.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4499021/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4499021/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Schultz, Matthew D -- He, Yupeng -- Whitaker, John W -- Hariharan, Manoj -- Mukamel, Eran A -- Leung, Danny -- Rajagopal, Nisha -- Nery, Joseph R -- Urich, Mark A -- Chen, Huaming -- Lin, Shin -- Lin, Yiing -- Jung, Inkyung -- Schmitt, Anthony D -- Selvaraj, Siddarth -- Ren, Bing -- Sejnowski, Terrence J -- Wang, Wei -- Ecker, Joseph R -- F32 HL110473/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- F32HL110473/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- K99 HL119617/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- K99 NS080911/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- K99HL119617/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R00 NS080911/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R00NS080911/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 ES024984/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM008666/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U01 ES017166/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Jul 9;523(7559):212-6. doi: 10.1038/nature14465. Epub 2015 Jun 1.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Bioinformatics Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Genomic Analysis Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Genomic Analysis Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Computational Neurobiology Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Department of Cognitive Science, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Department of Genetics, Stanford University, 300 Pasteur Drive, M-344 Stanford, California 94305, USA. ; Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8109, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA. ; Bioinformatics Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Institute of Genomic Medicine, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Computational Neurobiology Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Division of Biological Sciences, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [3] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Genomic Analysis Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26030523" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Age Factors ; Alleles ; Chromosome Mapping ; *DNA Methylation ; *Epigenesis, Genetic ; Female ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Gene Expression Regulation ; Genetic Variation ; Humans ; Male ; Organ Specificity
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    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2013-03-08
    Description: Natural epigenetic variation provides a source for the generation of phenotypic diversity, but to understand its contribution to such diversity, its interaction with genetic variation requires further investigation. Here we report population-wide DNA sequencing of genomes, transcriptomes and methylomes of wild Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. Single cytosine methylation polymorphisms are not linked to genotype. However, the rate of linkage disequilibrium decay amongst differentially methylated regions targeted by RNA-directed DNA methylation is similar to the rate for single nucleotide polymorphisms. Association analyses of these RNA-directed DNA methylation regions with genetic variants identified thousands of methylation quantitative trait loci, which revealed the population estimate of genetically dependent methylation variation. Analysis of invariably methylated transposons and genes across this population indicates that loci targeted by RNA-directed DNA methylation are epigenetically activated in pollen and seeds, which facilitates proper development of these structures.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3798000/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3798000/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Schmitz, Robert J -- Schultz, Matthew D -- Urich, Mark A -- Nery, Joseph R -- Pelizzola, Mattia -- Libiger, Ondrej -- Alix, Andrew -- McCosh, Richard B -- Chen, Huaming -- Schork, Nicholas J -- Ecker, Joseph R -- F32 HG004830/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- F32HG004830/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- K99 GM100000/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- K99GM100000/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- UL1 RR025774/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Mar 14;495(7440):193-8. doi: 10.1038/nature11968. Epub 2013 Mar 6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Plant Biology Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23467092" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Arabidopsis/*genetics ; DNA Methylation/genetics ; DNA Transposable Elements/genetics ; Epigenesis, Genetic/*genetics ; Epigenomics ; Genetic Variation/*genetics ; Genome, Plant/*genetics ; Linkage Disequilibrium/genetics ; Pollen/genetics ; Polymorphism, Genetic/genetics ; Quantitative Trait Loci ; RNA, Messenger/analysis/genetics ; RNA, Plant/genetics ; Seeds/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2014-07-11
    Description: Human pluripotent stem cells hold potential for regenerative medicine, but available cell types have significant limitations. Although embryonic stem cells (ES cells) from in vitro fertilized embryos (IVF ES cells) represent the 'gold standard', they are allogeneic to patients. Autologous induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) are prone to epigenetic and transcriptional aberrations. To determine whether such abnormalities are intrinsic to somatic cell reprogramming or secondary to the reprogramming method, genetically matched sets of human IVF ES cells, iPS cells and nuclear transfer ES cells (NT ES cells) derived by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) were subjected to genome-wide analyses. Both NT ES cells and iPS cells derived from the same somatic cells contained comparable numbers of de novo copy number variations. In contrast, DNA methylation and transcriptome profiles of NT ES cells corresponded closely to those of IVF ES cells, whereas iPS cells differed and retained residual DNA methylation patterns typical of parental somatic cells. Thus, human somatic cells can be faithfully reprogrammed to pluripotency by SCNT and are therefore ideal for cell replacement therapies.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ma, Hong -- Morey, Robert -- O'Neil, Ryan C -- He, Yupeng -- Daughtry, Brittany -- Schultz, Matthew D -- Hariharan, Manoj -- Nery, Joseph R -- Castanon, Rosa -- Sabatini, Karen -- Thiagarajan, Rathi D -- Tachibana, Masahito -- Kang, Eunju -- Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca -- Ahmed, Riffat -- Gutierrez, Nuria Marti -- Van Dyken, Crystal -- Polat, Alim -- Sugawara, Atsushi -- Sparman, Michelle -- Gokhale, Sumita -- Amato, Paula -- Wolf, Don P -- Ecker, Joseph R -- Laurent, Louise C -- Mitalipov, Shoukhrat -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jul 10;511(7508):177-83. doi: 10.1038/nature13551. Epub 2014 Jul 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy, Oregon Health & Science University, 3303 Southwest Bond Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA [2] Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA [3]. ; 1] Department of Reproductive Medicine, University of California, San Diego, Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine, 2880 Torrey Pines Scenic Drive, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2]. ; 1] Genomic Analysis Laboratory, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Bioinformatics Program, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy, Oregon Health & Science University, 3303 Southwest Bond Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA [2] Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA. ; Genomic Analysis Laboratory, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Department of Reproductive Medicine, University of California, San Diego, Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine, 2880 Torrey Pines Scenic Drive, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA [2] Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, South Miyagi Medical Center, Shibata-gun, Miyagi 989-1253, Japan (M.T.); Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden (A.P.). ; Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA. ; University Pathologists LLC, Boston University School of Medicine, Roger Williams Medical Center, Providence, Rhode Island 02118, USA. ; Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oregon Health & Science University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA. ; 1] Genomic Analysis Laboratory, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy, Oregon Health & Science University, 3303 Southwest Bond Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA [2] Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA [3] Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oregon Health & Science University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25008523" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Line ; *Cellular Reprogramming ; Chromosome Aberrations ; Chromosomes, Human, X/genetics/metabolism ; DNA Copy Number Variations ; DNA Methylation ; Genome-Wide Association Study ; Genomic Imprinting ; Humans ; Nuclear Transfer Techniques/standards ; Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology/*metabolism ; Transcriptome
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2015-11-26
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Schultz, Matthew D -- He, Yupeng -- Whitaker, John W -- Hariharan, Manoj -- Mukamel, Eran A -- Leung, Danny -- Rajagopal, Nisha -- Nery, Joseph R -- Urich, Mark A -- Chen, Huaming -- Lin, Shin -- Lin, Yiing -- Jung, Inkyung -- Schmitt, Anthony D -- Selvaraj, Siddarth -- Ren, Bing -- Sejnowski, Terrence J -- Wang, Wei -- Ecker, Joseph R -- England -- Nature. 2016 Feb 11;530(7589):242. doi: 10.1038/nature16179. Epub 2015 Nov 25.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26605523" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2013-07-06
    Description: DNA methylation is implicated in mammalian brain development and plasticity underlying learning and memory. We report the genome-wide composition, patterning, cell specificity, and dynamics of DNA methylation at single-base resolution in human and mouse frontal cortex throughout their lifespan. Widespread methylome reconfiguration occurs during fetal to young adult development, coincident with synaptogenesis. During this period, highly conserved non-CG methylation (mCH) accumulates in neurons, but not glia, to become the dominant form of methylation in the human neuronal genome. Moreover, we found an mCH signature that identifies genes escaping X-chromosome inactivation. Last, whole-genome single-base resolution 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (hmC) maps revealed that hmC marks fetal brain cell genomes at putative regulatory regions that are CG-demethylated and activated in the adult brain and that CG demethylation at these hmC-poised loci depends on Tet2 activity.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3785061/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3785061/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lister, Ryan -- Mukamel, Eran A -- Nery, Joseph R -- Urich, Mark -- Puddifoot, Clare A -- Johnson, Nicholas D -- Lucero, Jacinta -- Huang, Yun -- Dwork, Andrew J -- Schultz, Matthew D -- Yu, Miao -- Tonti-Filippini, Julian -- Heyn, Holger -- Hu, Shijun -- Wu, Joseph C -- Rao, Anjana -- Esteller, Manel -- He, Chuan -- Haghighi, Fatemeh G -- Sejnowski, Terrence J -- Behrens, M Margarita -- Ecker, Joseph R -- AI44432/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- CA151535/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- HD065812/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- HG006827/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- K99NS080911/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- MH094670/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI044432/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA151535/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD065812/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG006827/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH094670/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH094774/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Aug 9;341(6146):1237905. doi: 10.1126/science.1237905. Epub 2013 Jul 4.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Genomic Analysis Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. ryan.lister@uwa.edu.au〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23828890" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: 5-Methylcytosine/metabolism ; Adult ; Animals ; Base Sequence ; Conserved Sequence ; Cytosine/*analogs & derivatives/metabolism ; *DNA Methylation ; *Epigenesis, Genetic ; Epigenomics ; Frontal Lobe/*growth & development ; *Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental ; Genome-Wide Association Study ; Humans ; Longevity ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; X Chromosome Inactivation/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2011-09-17
    Description: Epigenetic information, which may affect an organism's phenotype, can be stored and stably inherited in the form of cytosine DNA methylation. Changes in DNA methylation can produce meiotically stable epialleles that affect transcription and morphology, but the rates of spontaneous gain or loss of DNA methylation are unknown. We examined spontaneously occurring variation in DNA methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana plants propagated by single-seed descent for 30 generations. We identified 114,287 CG single methylation polymorphisms and 2485 CG differentially methylated regions (DMRs), both of which show patterns of divergence compared with the ancestral state. Thus, transgenerational epigenetic variation in DNA methylation may generate new allelic states that alter transcription, providing a mechanism for phenotypic diversity in the absence of genetic mutation.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3210014/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3210014/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Schmitz, Robert J -- Schultz, Matthew D -- Lewsey, Mathew G -- O'Malley, Ronan C -- Urich, Mark A -- Libiger, Ondrej -- Schork, Nicholas J -- Ecker, Joseph R -- F32 HG004830/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- F32 HG004830-01/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- F32 HG004830-02/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- F32 HG004830-03/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- F32-HG004830/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG003523/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG003523-01/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG003523-02/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG003523-03/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- UL1 RR025774/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Oct 21;334(6054):369-73. doi: 10.1126/science.1212959. Epub 2011 Sep 15.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Plant Biology Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21921155" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alleles ; Arabidopsis/*genetics/metabolism ; *DNA Methylation ; DNA Transposable Elements ; DNA, Intergenic ; DNA, Plant/genetics/metabolism ; Dinucleoside Phosphates/metabolism ; *Epigenesis, Genetic ; Genes, Plant ; Genetic Variation ; Genome, Plant ; Linear Models ; Mutation ; Polymorphism, Genetic ; Promoter Regions, Genetic ; Transcription, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [S.l.] : American Institute of Physics (AIP)
    Journal of Applied Physics 63 (1988), S. 3844-3846 
    ISSN: 1089-7550
    Source: AIP Digital Archive
    Topics: Physics
    Notes: The feasibility of directly overwriting certain magneto-optical recording materials without the use of an external magnetic field has recently been demonstrated in our laboratory. In this report experiments to evaluate the beam positioning accuracy necessary for successful direct overwrite, the effects of static bias fields on the direct overwrite process, and the possibility of writing and erasing domains of arbitrary length on direct-overwrite materials are discussed. The data show that an error in beam positioning of at least 75% of the nominal domain diameter is tolerable for complete erasure without an external applied field. Application of particular values of dc bias field is shown to decrease the pulse width required to write while only slightly narrowing the allowed margin of erase pulse width, thus raising the allowed data rate.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    ISSN: 1089-7550
    Source: AIP Digital Archive
    Topics: Physics
    Notes: Statically unstable spikelike reversed magnetic domains emanating from the backgap closure of thin-film heads have been observed with high-frequency (1–20 MHz) and high-current amplitude (20–80 mA p-p) drive fields by using a wide-field magneto-optic domain observation system with a 10-nsec exposure time. The spikelike domains are repeatedly nucleated and annihilated within the drive cycle and do not remain after removal of the excitation. The formation of spikelike domains is due to the magnetization rotation back to the nearest easy directions after fanning out near the backgap closure to carry the spreading flux out of (or converging flux into) the backgap closure. The spikelike domains block the flux flow into and out of the backgap closure at excitation frequencies above 10 MHz due to the slow domain annihilation process. It is speculated that occasional failure of these spikelike domains to annihilate after a write pulse could lead to noise when they suddenly collapse during read out.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2013-10-16
    Description: Comparisons within expanding sequence databases have revealed a dynamic interplay among genomic and epigenomic forces in driving plant evolution. Such forces are especially obvious within the F-Box (FBX) superfamily, one of the largest and most polymorphic gene families in land plants, where its frequent lineage-specific expansions and contractions provide an...
    Print ISSN: 0027-8424
    Electronic ISSN: 1091-6490
    Topics: Biology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General
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