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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2012-01-18
    Description: 14-3-3 proteins are ubiquitously expressed regulators of various cellular functions, including proliferation, metabolism, and differentiation, and altered 14-3-3 expression is associated with development and progression of cancer. We report a transforming 14-3-3 oncoprotein, which we identified through conventional cytogenetics and whole-transcriptome sequencing analysis as a highly recurrent genetic mechanism in a clinically aggressive form of uterine sarcoma: high-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS). The 14-3-3 oncoprotein results from a t(10;17) genomic rearrangement, leading to fusion between 14-3-3ε (YWHAE) and either of two nearly identical FAM22 family members (FAM22A or FAM22B). Expression of YWHAE–FAM22 fusion oncoproteins was demonstrated by immunoblot in t(10;17)-bearing frozen tumor and cell line samples. YWHAE–FAM22 fusion gene knockdowns were performed with shRNAs and siRNAs targeting various FAM22A exons in an t(10;17)-bearing ESS cell line (ESS1): Fusion protein expression was inhibited, with corresponding reduction in cell growth and migration. YWHAE–FAM22 maintains a structurally and functionally intact 14-3-3ε (YWHAE) protein-binding domain, which is directed to the nucleus by a FAM22 nuclear localization sequence. In contrast to classic ESS, harboring JAZF1 genetic fusions, YWHAE–FAM22 ESS display high-grade histologic features, a distinct gene-expression profile, and a more aggressive clinical course. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated absolute specificity of YWHAE–FAM22A/B genetic rearrangement for high-grade ESS, with no fusions detected in other uterine and nonuterine mesenchymal tumors (55 tumor types, n = 827). These discoveries reveal diagnostically and therapeutically relevant models for characterizing aberrant 14-3-3 oncogenic functions.
    Print ISSN: 0027-8424
    Electronic ISSN: 1091-6490
    Topics: Biology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2005-08-16
    Description: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a pluripotent cell type that can differentiate into several distinct lineages. Two key transcription factors, Runx2 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), drive MSCs to differentiate into either osteoblasts or adipocytes, respectively. How these two transcription factors are regulated in order to specify these alternate cell fates remains a pivotal question. Here we report that a 14-3-3-binding protein, TAZ (transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif), coactivates Runx2-dependent gene transcription while repressing PPARgamma-dependent gene transcription. By modulating TAZ expression in model cell lines, mouse embryonic fibroblasts, and primary MSCs in culture and in zebrafish in vivo, we observed alterations in osteogenic versus adipogenic potential. These results indicate that TAZ functions as a molecular rheostat that modulates MSC differentiation.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hong, Jeong-Ho -- Hwang, Eun Sook -- McManus, Michael T -- Amsterdam, Adam -- Tian, Yu -- Kalmukova, Ralitsa -- Mueller, Elisabetta -- Benjamin, Thomas -- Spiegelman, Bruce M -- Sharp, Phillip A -- Hopkins, Nancy -- Yaffe, Michael B -- CA042063/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- GM60594/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM68762/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2005 Aug 12;309(5737):1074-8.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Center for Cancer Research, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, E18-580, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16099986" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adipocytes/*cytology ; Animals ; Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 ; Bone Morphogenetic Proteins/pharmacology ; Cell Differentiation ; Cell Line ; Core Binding Factor Alpha 1 Subunit ; Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental ; Humans ; Mesenchymal Stromal Cells/*cytology/physiology ; Mice ; Neoplasm Proteins/metabolism ; Oligonucleotides, Antisense ; Osteoblasts/*cytology ; Osteocalcin/genetics ; Osteogenesis ; PPAR gamma/metabolism ; Promoter Regions, Genetic ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Proteins/chemistry/genetics/*physiology ; RNA, Small Interfering ; Transcription Factors/chemistry/genetics/metabolism/*physiology ; Transcriptional Activation ; Transfection ; Transforming Growth Factor beta/pharmacology ; Zebrafish ; Zebrafish Proteins/genetics/physiology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2013-07-28
    Description: The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) protein kinase promotes growth and is the target of rapamycin, a clinically useful drug that also prolongs life span in model organisms. A persistent mystery is why the phosphorylation of many bona fide mTORC1 substrates is resistant to rapamycin. We find that the in vitro kinase activity of mTORC1 toward peptides encompassing established phosphorylation sites varies widely and correlates strongly with the resistance of the sites to rapamycin, as well as to nutrient and growth factor starvation within cells. Slight modifications of the sites were sufficient to alter mTORC1 activity toward them in vitro and to cause concomitant changes within cells in their sensitivity to rapamycin and starvation. Thus, the intrinsic capacity of a phosphorylation site to serve as an mTORC1 substrate, a property we call substrate quality, is a major determinant of its sensitivity to modulators of the pathway. Our results reveal a mechanism through which mTORC1 effectors can respond differentially to the same signals.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3771538/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3771538/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kang, Seong A -- Pacold, Michael E -- Cervantes, Christopher L -- Lim, Daniel -- Lou, Hua Jane -- Ottina, Kathleen -- Gray, Nathanael S -- Turk, Benjamin E -- Yaffe, Michael B -- Sabatini, David M -- AI047389/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- CA103866/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA112967/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- ES015339/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- GM59281/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA014051/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA103866/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA129105/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R37 AI047389/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Jul 26;341(6144):1236566. doi: 10.1126/science.1236566.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Nine Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23888043" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Motifs ; Amino Acids/metabolism ; Animals ; Cell Line ; Culture Media ; Humans ; Mice ; Multiprotein Complexes ; Naphthyridines/pharmacology ; Peptides/chemistry/*metabolism ; Phosphorylation ; Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Sirolimus/*pharmacology ; TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors/*chemistry/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2013-04-13
    Description: Scaffold-assisted signaling cascades guide cellular decision-making. In budding yeast, one such signal transduction pathway called the mitotic exit network (MEN) governs the transition from mitosis to the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The MEN is conserved and in metazoans is known as the Hippo tumor-suppressor pathway. We found that signaling through the MEN kinase cascade was mediated by an unusual two-step process. The MEN kinase Cdc15 first phosphorylated the scaffold Nud1. This created a phospho-docking site on Nud1, to which the effector kinase complex Dbf2-Mob1 bound through a phosphoserine-threonine binding domain, in order to be activated by Cdc15. This mechanism of pathway activation has implications for signal transmission through other kinase cascades and might represent a general principle in scaffold-assisted signaling.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3884217/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3884217/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Rock, Jeremy M -- Lim, Daniel -- Stach, Lasse -- Ogrodowicz, Roksana W -- Keck, Jamie M -- Jones, Michele H -- Wong, Catherine C L -- Yates, John R 3rd -- Winey, Mark -- Smerdon, Stephen J -- Yaffe, Michael B -- Amon, Angelika -- CA112967/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- ES015339/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- F32 GM086038/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM056800/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM51312/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- MC_U117584228/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- P30 CA014051/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P41 GM103533/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41 RR011823/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- R01 ES015339/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM051312/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM056800/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R29 GM056800/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U117584228/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- U54 CA112967/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 May 17;340(6134):871-5. doi: 10.1126/science.1235822. Epub 2013 Apr 11.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23579499" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Anaphase ; Cell Cycle Proteins/chemistry/*metabolism ; Deoxyribonucleases/chemistry/*metabolism ; Enzyme Activation ; GTP-Binding Proteins/*metabolism ; *Mitosis ; Phosphoproteins/chemistry/*metabolism ; Phosphorylation ; Protein Conformation ; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/*metabolism ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae/cytology/*metabolism ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/chemistry/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; tRNA Methyltransferases/chemistry/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 1999-09-25
    Description: The flow of information from calcium-mobilizing receptors to nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)-dependent genes is critically dependent on interaction between the phosphatase calcineurin and the transcription factor NFAT. A high-affinity calcineurin-binding peptide was selected from combinatorial peptide libraries based on the calcineurin docking motif of NFAT. This peptide potently inhibited NFAT activation and NFAT-dependent expression of endogenous cytokine genes in T cells, without affecting the expression of other cytokines that require calcineurin but not NFAT. Substitution of the optimized peptide sequence into the natural calcineurin docking site increased the calcineurin responsiveness of NFAT. Compounds that interfere selectively with the calcineurin-NFAT interaction without affecting calcineurin phosphatase activity may be useful as therapeutic agents that are less toxic than current drugs.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Aramburu, J -- Yaffe, M B -- Lopez-Rodriguez, C -- Cantley, L C -- Hogan, P G -- Rao, A -- R01 AI 40127/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM056203/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HL 03601/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R43 AI 43726/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- etc. -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1999 Sep 24;285(5436):2129-33.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10497131" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Binding Sites ; Calcineurin/*metabolism ; Calcineurin Inhibitors ; Cell Nucleus/metabolism ; Cyclosporine/pharmacology ; Cytokines/biosynthesis/genetics ; DNA-Binding Proteins/*antagonists & inhibitors/chemistry/metabolism ; Gene Expression Regulation ; Genes, Reporter ; HeLa Cells ; Humans ; Immunosuppressive Agents/chemistry/metabolism/*pharmacology ; Jurkat Cells ; Molecular Sequence Data ; NFATC Transcription Factors ; *Nuclear Proteins ; Oligopeptides/chemistry/metabolism/*pharmacology ; Peptide Library ; Peptides/chemistry/metabolism/*pharmacology ; Phosphorylation ; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/metabolism ; T-Lymphocytes/*drug effects/immunology ; Transcription Factors/*antagonists & inhibitors/chemistry/metabolism ; Transfection
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2006-06-10
    Description: The links between the cell cycle machinery and the cytoskeletal proteins controlling cytokinesis are poorly understood. The small guanine nucleotide triphosphate (GTP)-binding protein RhoA stimulates type II myosin contractility and formin-dependent assembly of the cytokinetic actin contractile ring. We found that budding yeast Polo-like kinase Cdc5 controls the targeting and activation of Rho1 (RhoA) at the division site via Rho1 guanine nucleotide exchange factors. This role of Cdc5 (Polo-like kinase) in regulating Rho1 is likely to be relevant to cytokinesis and asymmetric cell division in other organisms.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Yoshida, Satoshi -- Kono, Keiko -- Lowery, Drew M -- Bartolini, Sara -- Yaffe, Michael B -- Ohya, Yoshikazu -- Pellman, David -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2006 Jul 7;313(5783):108-11. Epub 2006 Jun 8.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pediatric Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16763112" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Actins/metabolism ; Amino Acid Motifs ; Anaphase ; Cell Cycle Proteins/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; *Cytokinesis ; Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; Guanosine Triphosphate/metabolism ; Microfilament Proteins/metabolism ; Mitosis ; Mutation ; Phosphorylation ; Protein Kinases/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases ; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/metabolism ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae/*cytology/genetics/*metabolism ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Temperature ; rho GTP-Binding Proteins/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2003-02-22
    Description: We have developed a proteomic approach for identifying phosphopeptide binding domains that modulate kinase-dependent signaling pathways. An immobilized library of partially degenerate phosphopeptides biased toward a particular protein kinase phosphorylation motif is used to isolate phospho-binding domains that bind to proteins phosphorylated by that kinase. Applying this approach to cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), we identified the polo-box domain (PBD) of the mitotic kinase polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) as a specific phosphoserine (pSer) or phosphothreonine (pThr) binding domain and determined its optimal binding motif. This motif is present in known Plk1 substrates such as Cdc25, and an optimal phosphopeptide containing the motif disrupted PBD-substrate binding and localization of the PBD to centrosomes. This finding reveals how Plk1 can localize to specific sites within cells in response to Cdk phosphorylation at those sites and provides a structural mechanism for targeting the Plk1 kinase domain to its substrates.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Elia, Andrew E H -- Cantley, Lewis C -- Yaffe, Michael B -- GM52981/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM56203/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM056203/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2003 Feb 21;299(5610):1228-31.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Center for Cancer Research, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12595692" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Motifs ; Binding Sites ; Calorimetry ; Cell Cycle Proteins ; Centrosome/metabolism ; HeLa Cells ; Humans ; Ligands ; Mitosis ; Peptide Library ; Phosphopeptides/chemistry/*metabolism ; Phosphorylation ; Phosphoserine/*metabolism ; Phosphothreonine/*metabolism ; Point Mutation ; Protein Binding ; Protein Kinases/*chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; *Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases ; Proteomics ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins ; Signal Transduction ; cdc25 Phosphatases/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2005-12-13
    Description: Signal transduction pathways control cellular responses to stimuli, but it is unclear how molecular information is processed as a network. We constructed a systems model of 7980 intracellular signaling events that directly links measurements to 1440 response outputs associated with apoptosis. The model accurately predicted multiple time-dependent apoptotic responses induced by a combination of the death-inducing cytokine tumor necrosis factor with the prosurvival factors epidermal growth factor and insulin. By capturing the role of unsuspected autocrine circuits activated by transforming growth factor-alpha and interleukin-1alpha, the model revealed new molecular mechanisms connecting signaling to apoptosis. The model derived two groupings of intracellular signals that constitute fundamental dimensions (molecular "basis axes") within the apoptotic signaling network. Projection along these axes captures the entire measured apoptotic network, suggesting that cell survival is determined by signaling through this canonical basis set.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Janes, Kevin A -- Albeck, John G -- Gaudet, Suzanne -- Sorger, Peter K -- Lauffenburger, Douglas A -- Yaffe, Michael B -- GM059281/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50-GM68762/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2005 Dec 9;310(5754):1646-53.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Biological Engineering Division, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16339439" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Apoptosis ; Autocrine Communication ; Cell Survival ; Cytokines/*physiology ; Epidermal Growth Factor/physiology ; HT29 Cells ; Humans ; Insulin/physiology ; Interleukin-1/physiology ; JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism ; Least-Squares Analysis ; MAP Kinase Signaling System ; Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism ; Models, Biological ; *Signal Transduction ; *Systems Biology ; Systems Theory ; Transforming Growth Factor alpha/physiology ; Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/*physiology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2011-06-11
    Description: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) protein kinase is a master growth promoter that nucleates two complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2. Despite the diverse processes controlled by mTOR, few substrates are known. We defined the mTOR-regulated phosphoproteome by quantitative mass spectrometry and characterized the primary sequence motif specificity of mTOR using positional scanning peptide libraries. We found that the phosphorylation response to insulin is largely mTOR dependent and that mTOR exhibits a unique preference for proline, hydrophobic, and aromatic residues at the +1 position. The adaptor protein Grb10 was identified as an mTORC1 substrate that mediates the inhibition of phosphoinositide 3-kinase typical of cells lacking tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2), a tumor suppressor and negative regulator of mTORC1. Our work clarifies how mTORC1 inhibits growth factor signaling and opens new areas of investigation in mTOR biology.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3177140/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3177140/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hsu, Peggy P -- Kang, Seong A -- Rameseder, Jonathan -- Zhang, Yi -- Ottina, Kathleen A -- Lim, Daniel -- Peterson, Timothy R -- Choi, Yongmun -- Gray, Nathanael S -- Yaffe, Michael B -- Marto, Jarrod A -- Sabatini, David M -- AI47389/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- CA103866/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA112967/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- ES015339/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- GM68762/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA103866/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA103866-09/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA129105/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA129105-05/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R37 AI047389/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007753/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Jun 10;332(6035):1317-22. doi: 10.1126/science.1199498.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Nine Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21659604" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Line ; GRB10 Adaptor Protein/*metabolism ; Humans ; Insulin/metabolism ; Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/*metabolism ; Mass Spectrometry ; Mice ; Multiprotein Complexes ; Naphthyridines/pharmacology ; Phosphoproteins/metabolism ; Phosphorylation ; Proteins/*metabolism ; Proteome/metabolism ; *Signal Transduction ; Sirolimus/pharmacology ; TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 1998-01-07
    Description: Pin1 is an essential and conserved mitotic peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) that is distinct from members of two other families of conventional PPIases, cyclophilins and FKBPs (FK-506 binding proteins). In response to their phosphorylation during mitosis, Pin1 binds and regulates members of a highly conserved set of proteins that overlaps with antigens recognized by the mitosis-specific monoclonal antibody MPM-2. Pin1 is here shown to be a phosphorylation-dependent PPIase that specifically recognizes the phosphoserine-proline or phosphothreonine-proline bonds present in mitotic phosphoproteins. Both Pin1 and MPM-2 selected similar phosphorylated serine-proline-containing peptides, providing the basis for the specific interaction between Pin1 and MPM-2 antigens. Pin1 preferentially isomerized proline residues preceded by phosphorylated serine or threonine with up to 1300-fold selectivity compared with unphosphorylated peptides. Pin1 may thus regulate mitotic progression by catalyzing sequence-specific and phosphorylation-dependent proline isomerization.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Yaffe, M B -- Schutkowski, M -- Shen, M -- Zhou, X Z -- Stukenberg, P T -- Rahfeld, J U -- Xu, J -- Kuang, J -- Kirschner, M W -- Fischer, G -- Cantley, L C -- Lu, K P -- GM56203/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM56230/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM056203/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1997 Dec 12;278(5345):1957-60.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Medicine Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9395400" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Isomerases/metabolism ; Antibodies, Monoclonal ; Binding Sites ; Carrier Proteins/metabolism ; Cell Cycle Proteins/chemistry/*metabolism ; DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism ; Epitopes ; HeLa Cells ; Heat-Shock Proteins/metabolism ; Humans ; Isomerism ; *Mitosis ; Models, Molecular ; Oligopeptides/chemistry/*metabolism ; Peptide Library ; Peptidylprolyl Isomerase/chemistry/*metabolism ; Phosphoproteins/chemistry/immunology/*metabolism ; Phosphorylation ; Phosphoserine/metabolism ; Phosphothreonine/metabolism ; Proline/*metabolism ; Protein Conformation ; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/chemistry/metabolism ; Substrate Specificity ; Tacrolimus Binding Proteins
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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