ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • 1
    facet.materialart.
    facet.materialart.
    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Slavik, Kaela; Lemmen, Carsten; Zhang, Wenyan; Kerimoglu, Onur; Klingbeil, Knut; Wirtz, Kai W (accepted): The large scale impact of offshore windfarm structures on pelagic primary productivity in the southern North Sea. Hydrobiologia, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10750-018-3653-5
    Publication Date: 2018-12-01
    Description: The increasing demand for renewable energy is projected to result in a 40-fold increase in offshore wind electricity in the European Union by 2030. Despite a great number of local impact studies for selected marine populations, the regional ecosystem impacts of offshore wind farm structures are not yet well assessed nor understood. The study resulting from this dataset investigates whether the accumulation of epifauna, dominated by the filter feeder Mytilus edulis (blue mussel), on turbine structures affects pelagic primary production in the southern North Sea.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/zip, 816.0 kBytes
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    facet.materialart.
    facet.materialart.
    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Lemmen, Carsten (2018): North Sea ecosystem-scale model-based quantification of net primary productivity changes by the benthic filter feeder Mytilus edulis. Water, 10(11), 1527, https://doi.org/10.3390/w10111527
    Publication Date: 2019-02-08
    Description: Blue mussels filter water and transport material to the ocean floor. I investigate with a computer model the effect of such filtration and transport in the southern North Sea and find that up to 10% of the net annually produced biomass is filtered. This effect is not the same everywhere: near-shore, it is up to 50% and it is negligible offshore. Considering filtration is important for understanding the spatial patterns of coastal ecosystems.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/zip, 797.0 kBytes
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    facet.materialart.
    facet.materialart.
    PANGAEA
    In:  GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht, Germany | Supplement to: Lemmen, Carsten (2009): World distribution of land cover changes during pre- and protohistoric times and estimation of induced carbon releases (Répartition mondiale des espaces défrichés à la pré- et protohistoire et estimation des rejets de carbone induits). Géomorphologie : Relief, Processus, Environnement, 4, http://geomorphologie.revues.org/index7756.html
    Publication Date: 2019-02-12
    Description: The role of Pre- and Protohistoric anthropogenic land cover changes needs to be quantified i) to establish a baseline for comparison with current human impact on the environment and ii) to separate it from naturally occurring changes in our environment. Results are presented from the simple, adaptation-driven, spatially explicit Global Land Use and technological Evolution Simulator (GLUES) for pre-Bronze age demographic, technological and economic change. Using scaling parameters from the History Database of the Global Environment as well as GLUES-simulated population density and subsistence style, the land requirement for growing crops is estimated. The intrusion of cropland into potentially forested areas is translated into carbon loss due to deforestation with the dynamic global vegetation model VECODE. The land demand in important Prehistoric growth areas - converted from mostly forested areas - led to large-scale regional (country size) deforestation of up to 11% of the potential forest. In total, 29 Gt carbon were lost from global forests between 10 000 BC and 2000 BC and were replaced by crops; this value is consistent with other estimates of Prehistoric deforestation. The generation of realistic (agri-)cultural development trajectories at a regional resolution is a major strength of GLUES. Most of the pre-Bronze age deforestation is simulated in a broad farming belt from Central Europe via India to China. Regional carbon loss is, e.g., 5 Gt in Europe and the Mediterranean, 6 Gt on the Indian subcontinent, 18 Gt in East and Southeast Asia, or 2.3 Gt in subsaharan Africa.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/octet-stream, 10.0 MBytes
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    facet.materialart.
    facet.materialart.
    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Lemmen, Carsten; Wirtz, Kai W (2014): On the sensitivity of the simulated European Neolithic transition to climate extremes. Journal of Archaeological Science, 51, 65-72, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jas.2012.10.023
    Publication Date: 2019-02-12
    Description: Was the spread of agropastoralism from the Fertile Crescent throughout Europe influenced by rapid climatic shifts? We here generate idealized climate events using palaeoclimate records. In a mathematical model of regional sociocultural development, these events disturb the subsistence base of simulated forager and farmer societies. We evaluate the regional simulated transition timings and durations against a published large set of radiocarbon dates for western Eurasia; the model is able to realistically hindcast much of the inhomogeneous space-time evolution of regional Neolithic transitions. Our study shows that the inclusion of climate events improves the simulation of typical lags between cultural complexes, but that the overall difference to a model without climate events is not significant. Climate events may not have been as important for early sociocultural dynamics as endogenous factors.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/x-gzip, 681.0 kBytes
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    facet.materialart.
    facet.materialart.
    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Lemmen, Carsten; Khan, Aurangzeb (2013): A simulation of the Neolithic Transition in the Indus Valley. In: L. Giosan, D. Q. Fuller, K. Nicoll, R. K. Flad & P. D. Clift (eds.) Climates, Landscapes, and Civilizations; American Geophysical Union, Geophysical Monograph Series, 198, 107-114, https://doi.org/10.1029/2012GM001217
    Publication Date: 2019-02-12
    Description: The Indus Valley Civilization (IVC) was one of the first great civilizations in prehistory. This bronze age civilization flourished from the end of the fourth millennium BC. It disintegrated during the second millennium BC; despite much research effort, this decline is not well understood. Less research has been devoted to the emergence of the IVC, which shows continuous cultural precursors since at least the seventh millennium BC. To understand the decline, we believe it is necessary to investigate the rise of the IVC, i.e., the establishment of agriculture and livestock, dense populations and technological developments 7000-3000 BC. Although much archaeologically typed information is available, our capability to investigate the system is hindered by poorly resolved chronology, and by a lack of field work in the intermediate areas between the Indus valley and Mesopotamia. We thus employ a complementary numerical simulation to develop a consistent picture of technology, agropastoralism and population developments in the IVC domain. Results from this Global Land Use and technological Evolution Simulator show that there is (1) fair agreement between the simulated timing of the agricultural transition and radiocarbon dates from early agricultural sites, but the transition is simulated first in India then Pakistan; (2) an independent agropas- toralism developing on the Indian subcontinent; and (3) a positive relationship between archeological artifact richness and simulated population density which remains to be quantified.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/x-gzip, 92.0 kBytes
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    facet.materialart.
    facet.materialart.
    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Lemmen, Carsten; Gronenborn, D; Wirtz, Kai W (2011): A simulation of the Neolithic transition in Western Eurasia. Journal of Archaeological Science, 38(12), 3459-3470, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jas.2011.08.008
    Publication Date: 2019-02-12
    Description: Farming and herding were introduced to Europe from the Near East and Anatolia; there are, however, considerable arguments about the mechanisms of this transition. Were it the people who moved and either outplaced, or admixed with, the indigenous hunter-gatherer groups? Or was it material and information that moved---the Neolithic Package---consisting of domesticated plants and animals and the knowledge of their use? The latter process is commonly referred to as cultural diffusion and the former as demic diffusion. Despite continuous and partly combined efforts by archaeologists, anthropologists, linguists, palaeontologists and geneticists, a final resolution of the debate has not yet been reached. In the present contribution we interpret results from the Global Land Use and technological Evolution Simulator (GLUES). GLUES is a mathematical model for regional sociocultural development, embedded in the geoenvironmental context, during the Holocene. We demonstrate that the model is able to realistically hindcast the expansion speed and the inhomogeneous space-time evolution of the transition to agropastoralism in western Eurasia. In contrast to models that do not resolve endogenous sociocultural dynamics, our model describes and explains how and why the Neolithic advanced in stages. We uncouple the mechanisms of migration and information exchange and also of migration and the spread of agropastoralism. We find that: (1) An indigenous form of agropastoralism could well have arisen in certain Mediterranean landscapes, but not in Northern and Central Europe, where it depended on imported technology and material. (2) Both demic diffusion by migration and cultural diffusion by trade may explain the western European transition equally well. (3) Migrating farmers apparently contribute less than local adopters to the establishment of agropastoralism. Our study thus underlines the importance of adoption of introduced technologies and economies by resident foragers.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/octet-stream, 141.0 kBytes
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2003-08-01
    Description: During the Holocene strong gradients in the distribution of technologyincluding subsistence ways emerged on a global scale.These patterns were further amplified in historic times and are stillvisible through worldwide differences in national wealth.In order to evaluate major factors responsible for the shift fromforaging to food production we here employ quantitative methods bydeveloping a deterministic but simple model. After compiling existing maps of potential vegetation at 5000 BP theinhabited world is split into 197 regions with homogeneous environmentalconditions. Suitable variables for the macro-economic and culturaldevelopment in the Neolithic period are found to be farming to hunting-gatheringratio, number of agricultural economies and a technological development index.The model explicitly describes economic adaptation, growth and migrationof human populations together with the spread of their cultural characteristics; it accounts for over-exploitation of natural resources, crowdingmortality and the climate variability on a millennium scale.In a thorough model validation region specific trajectories are compared toarchaeological evidence revealing a high correspondence. Major parts of the knownsequence of Neolithic centers including the timing differences are robustlyreproduced. A series of known problems in prehistory is discussedcomprising the lag between domestication and full scale farming, the off-levelingof the technological boost following the transition, the emergence ofdistinct migration waves and sensitivity to climate fluctuations.Not mere population pressure but continuous innovation and competition betweensubsistence strategies is identified as a prime mover of agricultural development.The results suggest that few aspects of biogeography may have determined theobserved continental gradients in the number of domesticable species ultimatelyleading to an increasing differentiation in technology and demography. ©2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers
    Print ISSN: 0165-0009
    Electronic ISSN: 1573-1480
    Topics: Geosciences , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2018-06-26
    Description: The unprecedented use of Earth's resources by humans, in combination with increasing natural variability in natural processes over the past century, is affecting the evolution of the Earth system. To better understand natural processes and their potential future trajectories requires improved integration with and quantification of human processes. Similarly, to mitigate risk and facilitate socio-economic development requires a better understanding of how the natural system (e.g. climate variability and change, extreme weather events, and processes affecting soil fertility) affects human processes. Our understanding of these interactions and feedback between human and natural systems has been formalized through a variety of modelling approaches. However, a common conceptual framework or set of guidelines to model human–natural-system feedbacks is lacking. The presented research lays out a conceptual framework that includes representing model coupling configuration in combination with the frequency of interaction and coordination of communication between coupled models. Four different approaches used to couple representations of the human and natural system are presented in relation to this framework, which vary in the processes represented and in the scale of their application. From the development and experience associated with the four models of coupled human–natural systems, the following eight lessons were identified that if taken into account by future coupled human–natural-systems model developments may increase their success: (1) leverage the power of sensitivity analysis with models, (2) remember modelling is an iterative process, (3) create a common language, (4) make code open-access, (5) ensure consistency, (6) reconcile spatio-temporal mismatch, (7) construct homogeneous units, and (8) incorporating feedback increases non-linearity and variability. Following a discussion of feedbacks, a way forward to expedite model coupling and increase the longevity and interoperability of models is given, which suggests the use of a wrapper container software, a standardized applications programming interface (API), the incorporation of standard names, the mitigation of sunk costs by creating interfaces to multiple coupling frameworks, and the adoption of reproducible workflow environments to wire the pieces together.
    Print ISSN: 2190-4979
    Electronic ISSN: 2190-4987
    Topics: Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2018-03-12
    Description: Shelf and coastal sea processes extend from the atmosphere through the water column and into the seabed. These processes reflect intimate interactions between physical, chemical, and biological states on multiple scales. As a consequence, coastal system modelling requires a high and flexible degree of process and domain integration; this has so far hardly been achieved by current model systems. The lack of modularity and flexibility in integrated models hinders the exchange of data and model components and has historically imposed the supremacy of specific physical driver models. We present the Modular System for Shelves and Coasts (MOSSCO; http://www.mossco.de), a novel domain and process coupling system tailored but not limited to the coupling challenges of and applications in the coastal ocean. MOSSCO builds on the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) and on the Framework for Aquatic Biogeochemical Models (FABM). It goes beyond existing technologies by creating a unique level of modularity in both domain and process coupling, including a clear separation of component and basic model interfaces, flexible scheduling of several tens of models, and facilitation of iterative development at the lab and the station and on the coastal ocean scale. MOSSCO is rich in metadata and its concepts are also applicable outside the coastal domain. For coastal modelling, it contains dozens of example coupling configurations and tested set-ups for coupled applications. Thus, MOSSCO addresses the technology needs of a growing marine coastal Earth system community that encompasses very different disciplines, numerical tools, and research questions.
    Print ISSN: 1991-959X
    Electronic ISSN: 1991-9603
    Topics: Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2017-06-20
    Description: Shelf and coastal sea processes extend from the atmosphere through the water column and into the sea bed. These processes are driven by physical, chemical, and biological interactions at local scales, and they are influenced by transport and cross strong spatial gradients. The linkages between domains and many different processes are not adequately described in current model systems. Their limited integration level in part reflects lacking modularity and flexibility; this shortcoming hinders the exchange of data and model components and has historically imposed supremacy of specific physical driver models. We here present the Modular System for Shelves and Coasts (MOSSCO, http://www.mossco.de), a novel domain and process coupling system tailored – but not limited – to the coupling challenges of and applications in the coastal ocean. MOSSCO builds on the existing coupling technology Earth System Modeling Framework and on the Framework for Aquatic Biogeochemical Models, thereby creating a unique level of modularity in both domain and process coupling; the new framework adds rich metadata, flexible scheduling, configurations that allow several tens of models to be coupled, and tested setups for coastal coupled applications. That way, MOSSCO addresses the technology needs of a growing marine coastal Earth System community that encompasses very different disciplines, numerical tools, and research questions.
    Print ISSN: 1991-9611
    Electronic ISSN: 1991-962X
    Topics: Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...