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  • 1
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Rasmussen, Tine Lander; Oppo, Delia W; Thomsen, Erik; Lehmann, Scott J (2003): Deep sea records from the southeast Labrador Sea: ocean circulation changes and ice-rafting events during the last 160,000 years. Paleoceanography, 18(1), 1018, https://doi.org/10.1029/2001PA000736
    Publication Date: 2020-01-17
    Description: Results from two deep sea cores from northeast of Newfoundland at 1251 and 2527 m water depth, respectively, indicate that during the time period from 160,000 to 10,000 years BP, ice rafting events in the Labrador Sea were accompanied by rapid variations in deep and surface water circulation. Twelve ice-rafting events occurred, each coinciding with high concentrations of detrital carbonate and oxygen isotopic depletion of both surface and bottom waters. Eleven of these can be correlated with the North Atlantic Heinrich events H1–H11. The remaining very conspicuous ice-rafting event took place early in MIS substage 5e, at a time when the planktic faunal assemblage suggests marked warming of the sea surface. In the shallower core, benthic d13C values rise from a minimum during the deglaciation to peak substage 5e values following the last ice-rafting event, indicating that the ventilation of intermediate depths was renewed after the deglaciation was complete and continued throughout substage 5e. The benthic foraminifera suggest that this well-ventilated water mass was comparable to the modern Labrador Sea Water (LSW). The benthic faunas suggest that a relatively warm intermediate water mass entered the SE Labrador Sea during Heinrich events. Generally low benthic d13C values indicate that this water mass was poorly ventilated and rich in inorganic nutrients. Isotope data and benthic faunal distributions indicate that North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formed in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea reached the SE Labrador Sea between the Heinrich events.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 51 data points
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  • 2
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Hughen, Konrad A; Lehmann, Scott J; Southon, John R; Overpeck, Jonathan T; Marchal, Olivier; Herring, C; Turnbull, J (2004): 14C Activity and Global Carbon Cycle Changes over the Past 50,000 Years. Science, 303(5655), 202-207, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1090300
    Publication Date: 2020-01-18
    Description: A series of 14C measurements in Ocean Drilling Program cores from the tropical Cariaco Basin, which have been correlated to the annual-layer counted chronology for the Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2 (GISP2) ice core, provides a high-resolution calibration of the radiocarbon time scale back to 50,000 years before the present. Independent radiometric dating of events correlated to GISP2 suggests that the calibration is accurate. Reconstructed 14C activities varied substantially during the last glacial period, including sharp peaks synchronous with the Laschamp and Mono Lake geomagnetic field intensity minimal and cosmogenic nuclide peaks in ice cores and marine sediments. Simulations with a geochemical box model suggest that much of the variability can be explained by geomagnetically modulated changes in 14C production rate together with plausible changes in deep-ocean ventilation and the global carbon cycle during glaciation.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 3013 data points
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  • 3
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Keigwin, Lloyd D; Lehmann, Scott J (1994): Deep circulation change linked to Heinrich event 1 and Younger Dryas in a middepth North Atlantic core. Paleoceanography, 9(2), 185-194, https://doi.org/10.1029/94PA00032
    Publication Date: 2020-01-18
    Description: A core from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 43.5°N and ~3 km water depth shows distinct evidence of the deglacial events known as Heinrich event 1 (probably the marine equivalent of Oldest Dryas cooling in Europe) and the Younger Dryas. The Heinrich event, dated at three levels to between 14.3 and 15.0 ka, is marked by a minimum in foraminifera per gram, by maxima in rates of sedimentation, ice rafted debris per gram, and relative abundance of N. pachyderma (s.), and by a delta18O minimum in planktonic foraminifera. The Younger Dryas event is marked by peak abundance of N. pachyderma (s.) and a planktonic delta18O maximum. Benthic foraminiferal delta13C reaches minimum values during both the Heinrich event and the Younger Dryas. Our data indicate pronounced changes in surface water properties were coupled with reduced production of North Atlantic Deep Water at each of these times.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/zip, 2 datasets
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  • 4
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Hughen, Konrad A; Southon, John R; Lehmann, Scott J; Bertrand, Chanda J H; Turnbull, J (2006): Marine-derived 14C calibration and activity record for the past 50,000 years updated from the Cariaco Basin. Quaternary Science Reviews, 25(23-24), 3216-3227, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2006.03.014
    Publication Date: 2020-01-18
    Description: An expanded Cariaco Basin 14C chronology is tied to 230Th-dated Hulu Cave speleothem records in order to provide detailed marine-based 14C calibration for the past 50,000 years. The revised, high-resolution Cariaco 14C calibration record agrees well with data from 230Th-dated fossil corals back to 33 ka, with continued agreement despite increased scatter back to 50 ka, suggesting that the record provides accurate calibration back to the limits of radiocarbon dating. The calibration data document highly elevated Delta14C during the Glacial period. Carbon cycle box model simulations show that the majority of observed Delta14C change can be explained by increased 14C production. However, from 45 to 15 ka, Delta14C remains anomalously high, indicating that the distribution of radiocarbon between surface and deep ocean reservoirs was different than it is today. Additional observations of the magnitude, spatial extent and timing of deep ocean Delta14C shifts are critical for a complete understanding of observed Glacial Delta14C variability.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 7383 data points
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2020-01-21
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 49 data points
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2020-01-21
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 630 data points
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