ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Collection
Language
  • 1
    Monograph available for loan
    Monograph available for loan
    Princeton, N.J. : Princeton Univ. Press
    Call number: M 15.0249
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: 386 S. : graph. Darst.
    Location: Upper compact magazine
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Monograph available for loan
    Monograph available for loan
    Washington, D.C. : Mineralogical Society of America
    Associated volumes
    Call number: 11/M 96.0480
    In: Reviews in mineralogy
    Description / Table of Contents: At the time of the first printing (1996), interest in the element boron was growing rapidly. We felt that it was an opportune moment to ask investigators active in research on boron to review developments in their respective fields so that readers could learn what was-and wasn't-known about boron and its minerals, geochemistry and petrology. Since 1996, interest in boron has, if anything, increased, and continued demand for the Reviews in Mineralogy "boron bible" has motivated the Mineralogical Society of America to reprint the volume. Demand is reflected in citations, and according to ISI's Science Citation Index, the number of citations since publication to the volume is about 380, with some individual chapters having been cited as many as 44 times. In preparation for this printing, authors of 15 of the 19 original chapters have updated, corrected or added to their chapters within the constraints that no pages be added. Most addenda are bibliographies of literature published since 1996; a few also include summaries of significant findings. Addenda for each chapter follow the chapter, except for those for Chapters 1 and 2, which are merged onto pages 115-116 and 385. A table of new B-minerals since 1996 is given on p. 28, and many modifications were made to the table (p. 7-27) of B-minerals known prior to 1996 (corrections to formulae, mineral names, localities, etc.). Similar up-datings of Table 1 (p. 223) in Chapter 5 and numerous tables in Chapter 9 (p. 387) were undertaken, and Figure 15 in Chapter 11 (p. 619), which-embarrassingly-was missing from the first printing, has been supplied. Addenda to Chapter 13 are introduced on p. 744 and completed on p. 863 and 864. The following salient developments in research related to B are mentioned in the addenda: New minerals. Twenty-two boron minerals have been or are about to be described, and four more have been approved by the International Mineralogical Association, representing an increase of 10%, comparable to the increase in the number of all new minerals described during the same period (Anovitz and Grew, Chapter 1) Tourmaline group. In addition to four new tourmaline species, a new classification has been proposed. Another tourmaline, olenite, has been shown to contain substantial amounts of excess B in tetrahedral coordination, a finding that has revolutionized our view of tourmaline crystal chemistry (Werding and Schreyer, Chapter 3; references in addendum to Henry and Dutrow, Chapter 10). Boron isotopes. New techniques for measuring isotope ratios using secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) with the ion microprobe open up new opportunities for in situ analyses of individual grains and fluid inclusions (Hervig, Chapter 16). Boron isotopes have found applications in paleoceanography and thus add to the tools available for the study of past climates (Palmer and Swihart, Chapter 13). One of the major questions facing the use of hydrogeochemical models is whether or not they can be used with confidence to predict future evolution of groundwater systems. There is much controversy concerning the validity and uncertainties of non-reactive fluid flow systems. Adding chemical interaction to these flow models only confounds the problem. Although such models may accurately integrate the governing physical and chemical equations, many uncertainties are inherent in characterizing the natural system itself. These systems are inherently heterogeneous on a variety of scales rendering it impossible to know precisely the many details of the flow system and chemical composition of the host rock. Other properties of natural systems such as permeability and mineral surface area, to name just two, may never be known with any great precision, and in fact may be unknowable. Because of these uncertainties, it remains an open question as to what extent numerical models of groundwater flow and reactive transport wilI be useful in making accurate quantitative predictions. Nevertheless, reactive transport models should be able to predict the outcome for the particular representation of the porous medium used in the model. Finally, it should be mentioned that numerical models are often our only recourse to analyze such environmental problems as safe disposal of nuclear waste where predictions must be carried out over geologic time spans. Without such models it would be impossible to analyze such systems, because they involve times too long to perform laboratory experiments. The results of model calculations may affect important political decisions that must be made. Therefore, it is all the more important that models be applied and tested in diverse environments so that confidence and understanding of the limitations and strengths of model predictions are understood before irreversible decisions are made that could adversely affect generations to come.
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: xx, 862 S.
    ISBN: 0-939950-41-3 , 978-0-939950-41-6
    ISSN: 1529-6466
    Series Statement: Reviews in mineralogy 33
    Classification: A.3.6.
    Language: English
    Note: Chapter 1. Mineralogy, Petrology and Geochemistry of Boron: An Introduction by Lawrence M. Anovitz and Edward S. Grew, p. 1 - 40 Chapter 2. The Crystal Chemistry of Boron by Frank C. Hawthorne, Peter C. Burns, and Joel D. Grice, p. 41 - 116 Chapter 3. Experimental Studies on Borosilicates and Selected Borates by G. Werding and Werner Schreyer, p. 117 - 164 Chapter 4. Thermochemistry of Borosilicate Melts and Glasses - from Pyrex to Pegmatites by Alexandra Navrotsky, p. 165 - 180 Chapter 5. Thermodynamics of Boron Minerals: Summary of Structural, Volumetric and Thermochemical Data by Lawrence M. Anovitz and Bruce S. Hemingway, p. 181 - 262 Chapter 6. Continental Borate Deposits of Cenozoic Age by George I. Smith and Marjorie D. Medrano, p. 263 - 298 Chapter 7. Boron in Granitic Rocks and Their Contact Aureoles by David London, George B. Morgan, VI, and Michael B. Wolf, p. 299 - 330 Chapter 8. Experimental Studies of Boron in Granitic Melts by Donald B. Dingwell, Michel Pichavant, and François Holtz, p. 331 - 386 Chapter 9. Borosilicates (Exclusive of Tourmaline) and Boron in Rock-forming Minerals in Metamorphic Environments by Edward S. Grew, p. 387 - 502 Chapter 10. Metamorphic Tourmaline and Its Petrologic Applications by Darrell J. Henry and Barbara L. Dutrow, p. 503 - 558 Chapter 11. Tourmaline Associations with Hydrothermal Ore Deposits by John F. Slack, p. 559 - 644 Chapter 12. Geochemistry of Boron and Its Implications for Crustal and Mantle Processes by William P. Leeman and Virginia B. Sisson, p. 645 - 708 Chapter 13. Boron Isotope Geochemistry: An Overview by Martin R. Palmer and George H. Swihart, p. 709 - 744 Chapter 14. Similarities and Contrasts in Lunar and Terrestrial Boron Geochemistry by Denis M. Shaw, p. 745 - 770 Chapter 15. Electron Probe Microanalysis of Geologic Materials for Boron by James J. McGee and Lawrence M. Anovitz, p. 771 - 788 Chapter 16. Analyses of Geological Materials for Boron by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry by Richard L. Hervig, p. 789 - 804 Chapter 17. Nuclear Methods for Analysis of Boron in Minerals by J. David Robertson and M. Darby Dyar, p. 805 - 820 Chapter 18. Parallel Electron Energy-loss Spectroscopy of Boron in Minerals by Laurence A. J. Garvie and Peter R. Buseck, p. 821 - 844 Chapter 19. Instrumental Techniques for Boron Isotope Analysis by George H. Swihart, p. 845 - 862
    Location: Reading room
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Series available for loan
    Series available for loan
    Canberra : Australian Gov. Publ. Service
    Associated volumes
    Call number: SR 93.0764(272)
    In: Report
    Type of Medium: Series available for loan
    Pages: IV, 26 S.
    ISBN: 0644048824
    Series Statement: Report / Department of Resources & Energy, Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology & Geophysics 272
    Language: English
    Location: Lower compact magazine
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Description / Table of Contents: The pore scale is readily recognizable to geochemists, and yet in the past it has not received a great deal of attention as a distinct scale or environment that is associated with its own set of questions and challenges. Is the pore scale merely an environment in which smaller scale (molecular) processes aggregate, or are there emergent phenomena unique to this scale? Is it simply a finer-grained version of the “continuum” scale that is addressed in larger-scale models and interpretations? We would argue that the scale is important because it accounts for the pore architecture within which such diverse processes as multi-mineral reaction networks, microbial community interaction, and transport play out, giving rise to new geochemical behavior that might not be understood or predicted by considering smaller or larger scales alone. Fortunately, the last few years have seen a marked increase in the interest in pore-scale geochemical and mineralogical topics, making a Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry volume on the subject timely. The volume had its origins in a special theme session at the 2015 Goldschmidt Conference, Prague, Czech Republic, August 16-21, 2015, where at least some of the contributors to this volume gave presentations. From the diversity of pore-scale topics in the session that spanned the range from multi-scale characterization to modeling, it became clear that the time was right for a volume that would summarize the state of the science. Based in part on the evidence in the chapters included here, we would argue that the convergence of state of the art microscopic characterization and high performance pore scale reactive transport modeling has made it possible to address a number of long-standing questions and enigmas in the Earth and Environmental Sciences. Among these is the so-called “laboratory-field discrepancy” in geochemical reaction rates, which may be traceable in part to the failure to consider porescale geochemical issues that include chemical and physical heterogeneity, suppression of precipitation in nanopores, and transport limitations to and from reactive mineral surfaces. This RiMG volume includes contributions that review experimental, characterization, and modeling advances in our understanding of pore-scale geochemical processes. The volume begins with chapters authored or co-authored by two of the éminences grises in the field of pore-scale geochemistry and mineralogy, two who have made what is perhaps the strongest case that the pore-scale is distinct and requires special consideration in geochemistry. The chapter by Andrew Putnis gives a high level overview of how the pore-scale architecture of natural porous media impacts geochemical processes, and how porosity evolves as a result of these. The chapter makes the first mention of what is an important theme in this volume, namely the modification of thermodynamics and kinetics in small pores. In a chapter authored by Røyne and Jamtveit, the authors investigate the effects of mineral precipitation on porosity and permeability modification of rock. Their principal focus is on the case where porosity reduction results in fracturing of the rock, in the absence of which the reactions will be suppressed due to the lack of pore space. The next chapter by Emmanuel, Anovitz, and Day-Stirrat addresses chemo-mechanical processes and how they affect porosity evolution in geological media. The next chapter by Anovitz and Cole provides a comprehensive review of the approaches for characterizing and analyzing porosity in porous media. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) plays prominently as a technique in this chapter. Stack presents a review of what is known about mineral precipitation in pores and how this may differ from precipitation in bulk solution. Liu, Liu, Kerisit, and Zachara focus on porescale process coupling and the determination of effective (or upscaled) surface reaction rates in heterogeneous subsurface materials. Micro-continuum modeling approaches are investigated by Steefel, Beckingham, and Landrot, where the case is made that these may provide a useful tool where the computationally more expensive pore and pore network models are not feasible. The next chapter by Noiriel pursues the focus on characterization techniques with a review of X-ray microtomography (especially synchrotron-based) and how it can be used to investigate dynamic geochemical and physical processes in porous media. Tournassat and Steefel focus on a special class of micro-continuum models that include an explicit treatment of electrostatic effects, which are particularly important in the case of clays or clay-rich rock. Navarre-Sitchler, Brantley, and Rother present an overview of our current understanding of how porosity increases as a result of chemical weathering in silicate rocks, bringing to bear a range of characterization and modeling approaches that build toward a more quantitative description of the process. In the next chapter, Druhan, Brown, and Huber demonstrate how isotopic gradients across fluid–mineral boundaries can develop and how they provide insight into pore-scale processes. Yoon, Kang, and Valocchi provide a comprehensive review of lattice Boltzmann modeling techniques for pore-scale processes. Mehmani and Balhoff summarize mesoscale and hybrid models for flow and transport at the pore scale, including a discussion of the important class of models referred to as “pore network” that typically can operate at a larger scale than is possible with the true pore-scale models. Molins addresses the problem of how to represent interfaces (solid–fluid) at the pore scale using direct numerical simulation.
    Pages: Online-Ressource (xiv, 491 Seiten)
    ISBN: 9780939950966
    Language: English
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    ISSN: 1432-0967
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Geosciences
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    ISSN: 1432-0967
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Geosciences
    Notes: Abstract The template transformation allows rapid straight line plotting of fluid-bearing reactions for conditions exceeding the two phase field in water-carbon dioxide. The system CaO-MgO-SiO2-H2O-CO2 with the six solid phase tale, tremolite, quartz, magnesite, calcite, and dolomite is treated at 2Kb. These phases, in T-NH2O space at constant pressure, participate in two invariant points and eight reactions. Published T-NH2O data for three of these reactions at 2Kb are transformed using the template into LnK-1/T space to yield the parameters of the best (by eye) straight lines. The parameters of the other five reaction lines are derived by linear combination of these parameters. The reactions belonging to one invariant point in T-NH2O space will be straight lines that intersect at a single point in ln K-1/T space. This point is not the transformation of the invariant point, and it occurs because of the linear relationship between the reactions. Errors need to be considered in transforming the system back into T-NH2O space, especially when reactions lines with shallow slopes are involved.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    ISSN: 1432-0967
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Geosciences
    Notes: Abstract A retrograde assemblage in a specimen from the Franklin Marble Formation containing an unusual occurrence of three micas has been studied. Microprobe analyses of the margarite, muscovite and phlogopite reveal significant sodium and fluorine but otherwise show little mutual solid solution. The conditions that prevailed during the retrogression estimated from phase equilibria are T=370–450° C and $$X_{{\text{CO}}_{\text{2}} }$$ =0.03–0.3 at an assumed pressure of 2 kb. Examination of the phlogopite by TEM revealed replacement of phlogopite by chlorite. The chlorite occurred as small packets of layers interlayered with phlogopite. AEM analyses revealed that the chlorite composition approximates that of clinochlore. Transformations from a single phlogopite layer to one chlorite layer (a 1∶1 reaction) and also from two phlogopite layers to one chlorite layer (a 2∶1 reaction) have been observed. Both reactions result in a large volume change causing local strain at transition fronts. An apparently strain-free, volume-preserving transformation of 14 phlogopite layers terminating against 10 chlorite layers was observed which indicates that pervasive replacement may occur through a combination of both reactions. Topological and site occupancy changes during the transformation suggest that the reaction involves not only gain and loss of layer units, but also considerable local rupturing and reformation of bonds, concomitant with ion diffusion and interchange. Dislocations (layer terminations) at the transition front imply the existence of pathways for the fluid flow and ion transport required for mass balance.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    ISSN: 1432-0967
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Geosciences
    Notes: Abstract A computerised algorithm is used to arrange fluid-absent reactions about invariant points in P—T space for an end-member model of blueschist facies metamorphism at Port Macquarie, N.S.W., consisting of the nine phases quartz, albite, jadeite, lawsonite, zoisite, paragonite, glaucophane, pyrope and chlorite. Inspection of the print-out (a table of reaction take-off angles for each invariant point) indicates that this multisystem consists of two mutually exclusive sets of invariant points; lawsonite-absent, paragonite-absent and glaucophane-absent versus the other six. The algorithm is completely general for any two intensive variables and can treat solid solution minerals or degeneracy in reactions/invariant points.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    ISSN: 1432-2242
    Keywords: Ribulose 1,5 ; Bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase ; Small subunit ; Nuclear control of Rubisco ; Medicago
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Summary The response to selection for leaf proteins was studied during three selection cycles. Selection for high total nitrogen content showed 75% heritability, and the levels of both ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco) and cytoplasmic protein were strongly under nuclear DNA control. High and low protein content were correlated with chloroplast area. Although the amounts of nuclear DNA were similar, the ratio of Rubisco/DNA and chlorophyll/DNA changed during the selection process. It can be concluded that the levels of Rubisco achieved in mature plants of M. sativa are under nuclear DNA control. The possible involvement of small subunit (SSU) genes in controlling these levels is discussed.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Economic theory 3 (1993), S. 99-107 
    ISSN: 1432-0479
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Economics
    Notes: Summary This paper generalizes the Theorem of the Maximum (Berge [2]) to allow for discontinuous changes in the domain and the objective function. It also provides a geometrical version of the (generalized) theorem.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...