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  • 1
    Description / Table of Contents: Chapter 1. Significant ages—An introduction to petrochronology by Martin Engi, Pierre Lanari, Matthew J. Kohn, p. 1-12 --- Chapter 2. Phase relations, reaction sequences and petrochronology by Chris Yakymchuk, Chris Clark, Richard W. White, p. 13-54 --- Chapter 3. Local bulk composition effects on metamorphic mineral assemblages by Pierre Lanari and Martin Engi, p. 55-102 --- Chapter 4. Diffusion: Obstacles and opportunities in petrochronology by Matthew J. Kohn and Sarah c. Penniston–Dorland, p. 103-152 --- Chapter 5. Electron microprobe petrochronology by Michael L. Williams, Michael J. Jercinovic, Kevin H. Mahan, and Gregory Dumond, p. 153-182 --- Chapter 6. Petrochronology by laser–ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry by Andrew R. C. Kylander–Clark, p. 183-198 --- Chapter 7. Secondary ionization mass spectrometry analysis in petrochronology by Axel K. Schmitt and Jorge A. Vazquez, p. 199-230 --- Chapter 8. Petrochronology and TIMS by Blair Schoene and Ethan F. Baxter, p. 231-260 --- Chapter 9. Zircon: The metamorphic mineral by Daniela Rubatto, p. 261-296 --- Chapter 10. Petrochronology of zircon and baddeleyite in igneous rocks: Reconstructing magmatic processes at high temporal resolution by Urs Schaltegger and Jishua H. F. L. Davies, p. 297-328 --- Chapter 11. Hadean zircon petrochronology by T. Mark Harrison, Elizabeth A. Bell, and Patrick Boehnke, p. 329-364 --- Chapter 12. Petrochronology based on REE–minerals: monazite, allanite, xenotime, apatite by Martin Engi, p. 365-418 --- Chapter 13. Titanite petrochronology by Matthew J. Kohn, p. 419-442 --- Chapter 14. Petrology and geochronology of rutile by Thomas Zack and Ellen Kooijman, p. 443-468 --- Chapter 15. Garnet: A rock-forminf mineral petrochronometer by E. F. Baxter, M. J. Caddick, p. 469-534 --- Chapter 16. Chronometry and speedometry of magmatic processes using chemical diffusion in olivine, plagioclase and pyroxenes by Ralf Dohmen, Kathrin Faak, and Jon D. Blundy, p. 535-575
    Pages: Online-Ressource (XIV, 575 Seiten)
    ISBN: 9780939950058
    Language: English
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  • 2
    Description / Table of Contents: The idea for this book was conceived in early June, 2005 at a paleoaltimetry workshop held at Lehigh University, Lehigh, Pennsyalvania and organized by Dork Sahagian. The workshop was funded by the tectonics program at NSF, and was designed to bring together researchers in paleoaltimetry to discuss different techniques and focus the community on ways of improving paleoelevation estimates and consequent interpretations of geodynamics and tectonics. At this meeting, some commented that a comprehensive volume describing the different methods could help advance the field. I offered to contact the Mineralogical Society of America and the Geochemical Society about publishing a RiMG volume on paleoaltimetry. Because many of the techniques used to infer paleoelevations are geochemically-based or deal with thermodynamic principles, the GS and MSA agreed to the project. Two years and roughly 1000 e-mails later, our book has arrived. The book is organized into 4 sections: (1) Geodynamic and geomorphologic rationale (Clark). This chapter provides the broad rationale behind paleoaltimetry, i.e., why we study it. (2) Stable isotope proxies. These 4 chapters cover theory of stable isotopes in precipitation and their response to altitudinal gradients (Rowley), and stable isotopes sytematics in paleosols (Quade, Garzione and Eiler), silicates (Mulch and Chamberlain) and fossils (Kohn and Dettman). (3) Proxies of atmospheric properties. These 4 chapters cover temperature lapse rates (Meyer), entropy (Forest), and atmospheric pressure proxies, including total atmospheric pressure from gas bubbles in basalt (Sahagian and Proussevitch), and the partial pressure of CO2 (Kouwenberg, Kürshner, and McElwain). Note that clumped isotope thermometry (Quade, Garzione and Eiler) also provides direct estimates of temperature. (4) Radiogenic and cosmogenic nuclides. These 2 chapters cover low-temperature thermochronologic approaches (Reiners) and cosmogenic isotopes (Riihimaki and Libarkin). Some chapters overlap in general content (e.g., basic principles of stable isotopes in precipitation are covered to different degrees in all stable isotope chapters), but no attempt was made to limit authors' discussion of principles, or somehow attempt to arrive at a "consensus view" on any specific topic. Because science advances by critical discussion of concepts, such restrictions were viewed as counterproductive. This does mean that different chapters may present different views on reliability of paleoelevation estimates, and readers are advised to read other chapters in the book on related topics – they may be more closely linked than they might at first appear! I hope readers of this book will discover and appreciate the synergy among paleoaltimetry, climate change, and tectonic geomorphology. These interrelationships create a complex, yet rich field of scientific enquiry that in turn offers insights into climate and geodynamics.
    Pages: Online-Ressource (X, 278 Seiten)
    ISBN: 0939950782
    Language: English
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  • 3
    Description / Table of Contents: Several years ago, John Rakovan and John Hughes (colleagues at Miami of Ohio), and later Matt Kohn (at South Carolina), separately proposed short courses on phosphate minerals to the Council of the Mineralogical Society of America (MSA). Council suggested that they join forces. Thus this volume, Phosphates: Geochemical, Geobiological, and Materials Importance, was organized. It was prepared in advance of a short course of the same title, sponsored by MSA and presented at Golden, Colorado, October 25-27. We are pleased to present this volume entitled Phosphates: Geochemical, Geobiological and Materials Importance. Phosphate minerals are an integral component of geological and biological systems. They are found in virtually all rocks, are the major structural component of vertebrates, and when dissolved are critical for biological activity. This volume represents the work of many authors whose research illustrates how the unique chemical and physical behavior of phosphate minerals permits a wide range of applications that encompasses phosphate mineralogy, petrology, biomineralization, geochronology, and materials science. While diverse, these fields are all linked structurally, crystal-chemically and geochemically. As geoscientists turn their attention to the intersection of the biological, geological, and material science realms, there is no group of compounds more germane than the phosphates. The chapters of this book are grouped into five topics: Mineralogy and Crystal Chemistry, Petrology, Biomineralization, Geochronology, and Materials Applications. In the first section, three chapters are devoted to mineralogical aspects of apatite, a phase with both inorganic and organic origins, the most abundant phosphate mineral on earth, and the main mineral phase in the human body. Monazite and xenotime are highlighted in a fourth chapter, which includes their potential use as solid-state radioactive waste repositories. The Mineralogy and Crystal Chemistry section concludes with a detailed examination of the crystal chemistry of 244 other naturally-occurring phosphate phases and a listing of an additional 126 minerals. In the Petrology section, three chapters detail the igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary aspects of phosphate minerals. A fourth chapter provides a close look at analyzing phosphates for major, minor, and trace elements using the electron microprobe. A final chapter treats the global geochemical cycling of phosphate, a topic of intense, current geochemical interest. The Biomineralization section begins with a summary of the current state of research on bone, dentin and enamel phosphates, a topic that crosses disciplines that include mineralogical, medical, and dental research. The following two chapters treat the stable isotope and trace element compositions of modern and fossil biogenic phosphates, with applications to paleontology, paleoclimatology, and paleoecology. The Geochronology section focuses principally on apatite and monazite for U-ThPb, (U- Th)/He, and fission-track age determinations; it covers both classical geochronologic techniques as well as recent developments. The final section-Materials Applications-highlights how phosphate phases play key roles in fields such as optics, luminescence, medical engineering and prosthetics, and engineering of radionuclide repositories. These chapters provide a glimpse of the use of natural phases in engineering and biomedical applications and illustrate fruitful areas of future research in geochemical, geobiological and materials science. We hope all chapters in this volume encourage researchers to expand their work on all aspects of natural and synthetic phosphate compounds.
    Pages: Online-Ressource (XVI, 742 Seiten)
    ISBN: 093995060X
    Language: English
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  • 4
    Monograph available for loan
    Monograph available for loan
    Washington, D.C. : Mineralogical Society of America
    Associated volumes
    Call number: 11/M 03.0010
    In: Reviews in mineralogy & geochemistry
    Description / Table of Contents: Several years ago, John Rakovan and John Hughes (colleagues at Miami of Ohio), and later Matt Kohn (at South Carolina), separately proposed short courses on phosphate minerals to the Council of the Mineralogical Society of America (MSA). Council suggested that they join forces. Thus this volume, Phosphates: Geochemical, Geobiological, and Materials Importance, was organized. It was prepared in advance of a short course of the same title, sponsored by MSA and presented at Golden, Colorado, October 25-27. We are pleased to present this volume entitled Phosphates: Geochemical, Geobiological and Materials Importance. Phosphate minerals are an integral component of geological and biological systems. They are found in virtually all rocks, are the major structural component of vertebrates, and when dissolved are critical for biological activity. This volume represents the work of many authors whose research illustrates how the unique chemical and physical behavior of phosphate minerals permits a wide range of applications that encompasses phosphate mineralogy, petrology, biomineralization, geochronology, and materials science. While diverse, these fields are all linked structurally, crystal-chemically and geochemically. As geoscientists turn their attention to the intersection of the biological, geological, and material science realms, there is no group of compounds more germane than the phosphates. The chapters of this book are grouped into five topics: Mineralogy and Crystal Chemistry, Petrology, Biomineralization, Geochronology, and Materials Applications. In the first section, three chapters are devoted to mineralogical aspects of apatite, a phase with both inorganic and organic origins, the most abundant phosphate mineral on earth, and the main mineral phase in the human body. Monazite and xenotime are highlighted in a fourth chapter, which includes their potential use as solid-state radioactive waste repositories. The Mineralogy and Crystal Chemistry section concludes with a detailed examination of the crystal chemistry of 244 other naturally-occurring phosphate phases and a listing of an additional 126 minerals. In the Petrology section, three chapters detail the igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary aspects of phosphate minerals. A fourth chapter provides a close look at analyzing phosphates for major, minor, and trace elements using the electron microprobe. A final chapter treats the global geochemical cycling of phosphate, a topic of intense, current geochemical interest. The Biomineralization section begins with a summary of the current state of research on bone, dentin and enamel phosphates, a topic that crosses disciplines that include mineralogical, medical, and dental research. The following two chapters treat the stable isotope and trace element compositions of modern and fossil biogenic phosphates, with applications to paleontology, paleoclimatology, and paleoecology. The Geochronology section focuses principally on apatite and monazite for U-ThPb, (U- Th)/He, and fission-track age determinations; it covers both classical geochronologic techniques as well as recent developments. The final section-Materials Applications-highlights how phosphate phases play key roles in fields such as optics, luminescence, medical engineering and prosthetics, and engineering of radionuclide repositories. These chapters provide a glimpse of the use of natural phases in engineering and biomedical applications and illustrate fruitful areas of future research in geochemical, geobiological and materials science. We hope all chapters in this volume encourage researchers to expand their work on all aspects of natural and synthetic phosphate compounds.
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: xv, 742 S.
    ISBN: 0-939950-60-X , 978-0-939950-60-7
    ISSN: 1529-6466
    Series Statement: Reviews in mineralogy & geochemistry 48
    Classification: A.3.8.
    Language: English
    Note: Chapter 1. The Crystal Structure of Apatite, Ca5(PO4)3(F,OH,Cl) by John M. Hughes and John Rakovan, p. 1 - 12 Chapter 2. Compositions of the Apatite-Group Minerals: Substitution Mechanisms and Controlling Factors by Yuanming Pana and Michael E. Fleet, p. 13 - 50 Chapter 3. Growth and Surface Properties of Apatite by John Rakovan, p. 51 - 86 Chapter 4. Synthesis, Structure and Properties of Monazite, Pretulite, and Xenotime by Lynn A. Boatner, p. 87 - 122 Chapter 5. The Crystal Chemistry of the Phosphate Minerals by Danielle M.C. Huminicki and Frank C. Hawthorne, p. 123 - 254 Chapter 6. Apatite in Igneous Systems by Philip M. Piccoli and Philip A. Candela, p. 255 - 292 Chapter 7. Apatite, Monazite, and Xenotine in Metamorphic Rocks by Frank S. Spear and Joseph M. Pyle, p. 293 - 336 Chapter 8. Electron Microprobe Analysis of REE in Apatite, Monazite and Xenotime: Protocols and Pitfalls by Joseph M. Pyle, Frank S. Spear, and David A. Wark, p. 337 - 362 Chapter 9. Sedimentary Phosphorites - An Example: Phosphoria Formation, Southeastern Idaho, U.S.A by Andrew C. Knudsen and Mickey E. Gunter, p. 363 - 390 Chapter 10. The Global Phosphorus Cycle by Gabriel M. Filippelli, p. 391 - 426 Chapter 11. Calcium Phosphate Biominerals by James C. Elliott, p. 427 - 454 Chapter 12. Stable Isotope Composition of Biological Apatite by Matthew J. Kohn and Thure E. Cerling, p. 455 - 488 Chapter 13. Trace Elements in Recent and Fossil Bone Apatite by Clive N. Trueman and Noreen Tuross, p. 489 - 522 Chapter 14. U-TH-Pb Dating of Phosphate Minerals by T. Mark Harrison, Elizabeth J. Catlos, and Jean-Marc Montel, p. 523 - 558 Chapter 15. (U-Th)/He Dating of Phosphates: Apatite, Monazite, and Xenotime by Kenneth A. Farley and Daniel F. Stockli, p. 559 - 578 Chapter 16. Fission Track Dating of Phosphate Minerals and the Thermochronology of Apatite by Andrew J.W. Gleadow, David X. Belton, Barry P. Kohn, and Roderick W. Brown, p. 579 - 630 Chapter 17. Biomedical Application of Apatites by Karlis A. Gross and Christopher C. Berndt, p. 631 - 672 Chapter 18. Phosphates as Nuclear Waste Forms by Rodney C. Ewing and LuMin Wang, p. 673 - 700 Chapter 19. Apatite Luminescence by Glenn A. Waychuna, p. 701 - 742
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  • 5
    Monograph available for loan
    Monograph available for loan
    Chantilly, Va. : Mineralogical Society of America
    Associated volumes
    Call number: 11/M 07.0429
    In: Reviews in mineralogy & geochemistry
    Description / Table of Contents: The idea for this book was conceived in early June, 2005 at a paleoaltimetry workshop held at Lehigh University, Lehigh, Pennsyalvania and organized by Dork Sahagian. The workshop was funded by the tectonics program at NSF, and was designed to bring together researchers in paleoaltimetry to discuss different techniques and focus the community on ways of improving paleoelevation estimates and consequent interpretations of geodynamics and tectonics. At this meeting, some commented that a comprehensive volume describing the different methods could help advance the field. I offered to contact the Mineralogical Society of America and the Geochemical Society about publishing a RiMG volume on paleoaltimetry. Because many of the techniques used to infer paleoelevations are geochemically-based or deal with thermodynamic principles, the GS and MSA agreed to the project. Two years and roughly 1000 e-mails later, our book has arrived. The book is organized into 4 sections: Geodynamic and geomorphologic rationale (Clark). This chapter provides the broad rationale behind paleoaltimetry, i.e., why we study it. Stable isotope proxies. These 4 chapters cover theory of stable isotopes in precipitation and their response to altitudinal gradients (Rowley), and stable isotopes sytematics in paleosols (Quade, Garzione and Eiler), silicates (Mulch and Chamberlain) and fossils (Kohn and Dettman). Proxies of atmospheric properties. These 4 chapters cover temperature lapse rates (Meyer), entropy (Forest), and atmospheric pressure proxies, including total atmospheric pressure from gas bubbles in basalt (Sahagian and Proussevitch), and the partial pressure of CO2 (Kouwenberg, Kürshner, and McElwain). Note that clumped isotope thermometry (Quade, Garzione and Eiler) also provides direct estimates of temperature. Radiogenic and cosmogenic nuclides. These 2 chapters cover low-temperature thermochronologic approaches (Reiners) and cosmogenic isotopes (Riihimaki and Libarkin). Some chapters overlap in general content (e.g., basic principles of stable isotopes in precipitation are covered to different degrees in all stable isotope chapters), but no attempt was made to limit authors' discussion of principles, or somehow attempt to arrive at a "consensus view" on any specific topic. Because science advances by critical discussion of concepts, such restrictions were viewed as counterproductive. This does mean that different chapters may present different views on reliability of paleoelevation estimates, and readers are advised to read other chapters in the book on related topics – they may be more closely linked than they might at first appear! I hope readers of this book will discover and appreciate the synergy among paleoaltimetry, climate change, and tectonic geomorphology. These interrelationships create a complex, yet rich field of scientific enquiry that in turn offers insights into climate and geodynamics.
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: X, 278 S. , graph. Darst.
    ISBN: 0-939950-78-2 , 978-0-939950-78-2
    ISSN: 1529-6466
    Series Statement: Reviews in mineralogy & geochemistry 66
    Classification: A.3.8.
    Note: Chapter 1. The Significance of Paleotopography by Marin K. Clark, p. 1 - 22 Chapter 2. Stable Isotope-Based Paleoaltimetry: Theory and Validation by David B. Rowley, p. 23 - 52 Chapter 3. Paleoelevation Reconstruction Using Pedogenic Carbonates by Jay Quade, Carmala Garzione, and John Eiler, p. 53 - 88 Chapter 4. Stable Isotope Paleoaltimetry in Orogenic Belts – The Silicate Record in Surface and Crustal Geological Archives by Andreas Mulch and C. Page Chamberlain, p. 89 - 118 Chapter 5. Paleoaltimetry from Stable Isotope Compositions of Fossils by Matthew J. Kohn and David L. Dettman, p. 119 - 154 Chapter 6. A Review of Paleotemperature–Lapse Rate Methods for Estimating Paleoelevation from Fossil Floras by Herbert W. Meyer, p. 155 - 172 Chapter 7. Paleoaltimetry: A Review of Thermodynamic Methods by Chris E. Forest, p. 173 - 194 Chapter 8. Paleoelevation Measurement on the Basis of Vesicular Basalts by Dork Sahagian and Alex Proussevitch, p. 195 - 214 Chapter 9. Stomatal Frequency Change Over Altitudinal Gradients: Prospects for Paleoaltimetry by Lenny L. R. Kouwenberg, Wolfram M. Kürschner, and Jennifer C. McElwain, p. 215 - 242 Chapter 10. Thermochronologic Approaches to Paleotopography by Peter W. Reiners, p. 243 - 268 Chapter 11. Terrestrial Cosmogenic Nuclides as Paleoaltimetric Proxies by Catherine A. Riihimaki and Julie C. Libarkin, p. 269 - 278
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  • 6
    Monograph available for loan
    Monograph available for loan
    London : Faber and Faber
    Call number: PIK N 076-12-0078
    Description / Table of Contents: Contents: 1 Atlantic Shade ; 2 The Isle of London ; 3 The Cuckmere Delta ; 4 Suffolk Coastal ; 5 Upper Margins ; 6 A New Caledonia ; 7 Mountain Avens ; 8 Younger Dryas ; 9 The Shade of the Future
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: 368 S.
    ISBN: 9780571238163
    Branch Library: PIK Library
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  • 7
    Monograph available for loan
    Monograph available for loan
    Footscray, Vic. : Lonely Planet
    Call number: 1.8/M 10.0328
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: 468 S.
    Edition: 6th ed.
    ISBN: 9781741044560
    Series Statement: Lonely planet
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  • 8
    ISSN: 1090-6509
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Physics
    Notes: Abstract The energy dependence of the back reflectivity in the dynamical diffraction of x rays at a Bragg angle of π/2 (back diffraction) in perfect crystals of cubic symmetry (silicon) is investigated theoretically. In this case strict backscattering is realized only under the conditions of multiple diffraction. The features of the influence of multiple diffraction on back reflection in the energy range near the nuclear resonance radiation energy of 14.41 keV for 57Fe nuclei, specifically in the six-wave case, including the silicon (1,9,9) reflection (with an energy of 14.57 keV), which can be investigated experimentally with high energy resolution (1 meV) using synchrotron radiation and a monochromator developed for nuclear resonant absorption, are thoroughly studied. It is shown that the back reflectivity observed under the conditions of multiple diffraction has several maxima on the plot of its energy dependence with a value at each maximum smaller than half, in contrast to two-wave diffraction, where there is one maximum with a value close to unity.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    ISSN: 1520-6904
    Source: ACS Legacy Archives
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    s.l. : American Chemical Society
    The @journal of organic chemistry 28 (1963), S. 1037-1041 
    ISSN: 1520-6904
    Source: ACS Legacy Archives
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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