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  • 1
    Monograph available for loan
    Monograph available for loan
    Washington D.C. : American Geophysical Union
    Call number: PIK N 076-00-0159
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: 394 p.
    ISBN: 087590095x
    Series Statement: Geophysical Monograph 112
    Branch Library: PIK Library
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  • 2
    Call number: 13/ZSP-607(172)
    In: Proceedings of the ocean drilling program [Elektronische Ressource]
    Type of Medium: Series available for loan
    Pages: 1 CD-ROM , Booklet (XV, 15, 18 S.), 2 Faltbl. (User guide; Tab.) , 12 cm
    Series Statement: Proceedings of the ocean drilling program [Elektronische Ressource] : Scientific results 172.1997
    Location: Reading room
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
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  • 3
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Oppo, Delia W; Keigwin, Lloyd D; McManus, Jerry F; Cullen, James L (2001): Persistent suborbital climate variability in marine isotope stage 5 and termination II. Paleoceanography, 16(3), 280-292, https://doi.org/10.1029/2000PA000527
    Publication Date: 2020-01-17
    Description: New surface water records from two high sedimentation rate sites, located in the western subtropical North Atlantic near the axis of the Gulf Stream, provide clear evidence of suborbital climate variations through marine isotope stage (MIS) 5 persisting even into the warm peak of the interglaciation (substage 5e). We found that the amplitude of suborbital climate oscillations did not vary significantly for the whole of MIS 5, implying that ice volume has little or no influence on the amplitude of suborbital climate variability in this region. Although some records suggest that longer suborbital variations (4-10 kyr) during MIS 5 are linked to deepwater changes, none of the existing records is of sufficient resolution to assess if a linkage occurred for oscillations shorter than 4 kyr. However, when examined in conjunction with published data from the Norwegian Sea, new evidence from the subpolar North Atlantic suggests that coupled surface-deepwater oscillations occurred during the penultimate deglaciation. This supports the hypothesis that during glacial and deglacial times, ocean-ice interactions and deepwater variability amplify suborbital climate change at higher latitudes. We suggest that during the penultimate deglaciation the North Atlantic deepwater source varied between Nordic Sea and open North Atlantic locations, in parallel with surface temperature oscillations.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/zip, 12 datasets
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  • 4
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Gil, Isabelle M; Keigwin, Lloyd D; Abrantes, Fatima F (2015): The deglaciation over Laurentian Fan: History of diatoms, IRD, ice and fresh water. Quaternary Science Reviews, 129, 57-67, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2015.10.006
    Publication Date: 2020-01-17
    Description: A high-resolution diatom census coupled with other proxy data from Laurentian Fan (LF) provides a detailed description of the last deglaciation, bringing new insight to that period by revealing directly the timing of sea-ice formation and melting. Cold events Heinrich Event 1 (H1) and the Younger Dryas (YD) were multiphase events. H1 (~16.8-15.7 cal kyr BP) was defined by a two-pulse release of icebergs promoting sea-ice formation. Melting of sea-ice after H1 corresponds to a cold and fresh anomaly that may have kept the Bølling colder than the Allerød. At ~13.6 cal kyr BP, a cooling trend culminated with sea-ice formation, marking the YD onset (~12.8 cal kyr BP). The decrease in sea-ice (~12.2 cal kyr BP) led to a YD second phase characterized by very cold winters. However, the contribution of warm water diatoms tends to increase at the same time and the YD gradual end (~11.6 cal kyr BP) contrasts with its abrupt end in Greenland ice cores. The YD cannot be regarded as an event triggered by a fresh water input through the Laurentian Channel since only one weak brief input nearly 1000 yrs after its onset is recorded. Very cold and cool conditions without ice mark the following Preboreal. A northward heat flux between 10.8 and 10.2 cal kyr BP was interrupted by the increased influence of coastal waters likely fed by inland melting. There was no further development of sea-ice or ice-drift then.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/zip, 6 datasets
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  • 5
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Keigwin, Lloyd D (1998): Glacial-age hydrography of the far northwest Pacific Ocean. Paleoceanography, 13(4), 323-339, https://doi.org/10.1029/98PA00874
    Publication Date: 2020-01-17
    Description: Stable isotope data on benthic foraminifera from more than 30 cores on the northern Emperor Seamounts and in the Okhotsk Sea are synthesized in paleohydrographic profiles spanning the depth range 1000-4000 m. Holocene (core-top) benthic foraminiferal d18O and d13C data are calibrated to modern hydrographic properties through measurements of d13C of SumCO2 and d18O of seawater. Cibicidoides stable isotope ratios are close to the d13C and equilibrium d18O of seawater, whereas Uvigerina d18O and d13C are variably offset from Cibicidoides. Glacial maximum d13C of Cibicidoides displays a different vertical profile than that of the Holocene. When results are adjusted by +0.32 per mil to account for the secular change in d13C during the last glacial maximum, the data coincide with the modern seawater and foraminiferal curves deeper than ~2 km. However, at shallower depths d13C gradually increases by as much as 1 per mil above the modern value. Furthermore, above 2 km the benthic d18O decreases by ~0.5 per mil. These results are consistent with a benthic front at ~2 km in the North Pacific (see Herguera et al., 1992), but they differ from interpretations based on trace metal data which indicate a source of nutrient-depleted deep water during glaciation. The isotopic data suggest that during glaciation there was a better ventilated watermass at intermediate depths in the far northwestern Pacific, it was relatively fresher than deep waters there, and deep waters were as nutrient-rich as today.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/zip, 11 datasets
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  • 6
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Geology & Geophysics | Supplement to: Thornalley, David JR; Oppo, Delia W; Ortega, Pablo; Robson, Jon I; Brierley, Chris M; Davis, Renee; Hall, Ian R; Moffa-Sanchez, Paola; Rose, Neil L; Spooner, Peter T; Yashayaev, Igor M; Keigwin, Lloyd D (2018): Anomalously weak Labrador Sea convection and Atlantic overturning during the past 150 years. Nature, 556(7700), 227-230, https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-018-0007-4
    Publication Date: 2020-01-17
    Description: The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) is a system of ocean currents that has an essential role in Earth's climate, redistributing heat and influencing the carbon cycle. The AMOC has been shown to be weakening in recent years1; this decline may reflect decadal-scale variability in convection in the Labrador Sea, but short observational datasets preclude a longer-term perspective on the modern state and variability of Labrador Sea convection and the AMOC. Here we provide several lines of palaeo-oceanographic evidence that Labrador Sea deep convection and the AMOC have been anomalously weak over the past 150 years or so (since the end of the Little Ice Age, LIA, approximately AD 1850) compared with the preceding 1,500 years. Our palaeoclimate reconstructions indicate that the transition occurred either as a predominantly abrupt shift towards the end of the LIA, or as a more gradual, continued decline over the past 150 years; this ambiguity probably arises from non-AMOC influences on the various proxies or from the different sensitivities of these proxies to individual components of the AMOC. We suggest that enhanced freshwater fluxes from the Arctic and Nordic seas towards the end of the LIA—sourced from melting glaciers and thickened sea ice that developed earlier in the LIA—weakened Labrador Sea convection and the AMOC. The lack of a subsequent recovery may have resulted from hysteresis or from twentieth-century melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Our results suggest that recent decadal variability in Labrador Sea convection and the AMOC has occurred during an atypical, weak background state. Future work should aim to constrain the roles of internal climate variability and early anthropogenic forcing in the AMOC weakening described here. The data presented here is the supporting data for Thornalley et al. 2018 (see details below) and is derived from cores KNR-178-56JPC and KNR-178-48JPC. It includes the mean sortable silt size, details of radiocarbon dating, the % nps and binned sub-surface temperature reconstructions.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/zip, 22 datasets
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  • 7
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Keigwin, Lloyd D; Guilderson, Thomas P (2009): Bioturbation artifacts in zero-age sediments. Paleoceanography, 24(4), PA4212, https://doi.org/10.1029/2008PA001727
    Publication Date: 2020-01-17
    Description: Most seafloor sediments are dated with radiocarbon, and the sediment is assumed to be zero-age (modern) when the signal of atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons is present (Fraction modern (Fm) 〉 1). Using a simple mass balance, we show that even with Fm 〉 1, half of the planktonic foraminifera at the seafloor can be centuries old, because of bioturbation. This calculation, and data from four core sites in the western North Atlantic indicate that, first, during some part of the Little Ice Age (LIA) there may have been more Antarctic Bottom Water than today in the deep western North Atlantic. Alternatively, bioturbation may have introduced much older benthic foraminifera into surface sediments. Second, paleo-based warming of Sargasso Sea surface waters since the LIA must lag the actual warming because of bioturbation of older and colder foraminifera.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 51 data points
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  • 8
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Keigwin, Lloyd D; Sachs, Julian P; Rosenthal, Yair; Boyle, Edwards A (2005): The 8200 year B.P. event in the slope water system, western subpolar North Atlantic. Paleoceanography, 20(2), PA2003, https://doi.org/10.1029/2004PA001074
    Publication Date: 2020-01-17
    Description: Stable isotope, trace metal, alkenone paleothermometry, and radiocarbon methods have been applied to sediment cores in the western subpolar North Atlantic between Hudson Strait and Cape Hatteras to reveal the history of climate in that region over the past ~11 kyr. We focus on cores from the Laurentian Fan, which is known to have rapid and continuous accumulation of hemipelagic sediment. Although results among our various proxy data are not always in agreement, the weight of the evidence (alkenone sea surface temperature (SST), d18O and abundance of Globigerinoides ruber) indicates a continual cooling of surface waters over Laurentian Fan, from about 18°C in the early Holocene to about 8°C today. Alternatively, Mg/Ca data on planktonic foraminifera indicate no systematic change in Holocene SST. The inferred long-term decrease in SST was probably driven by decreasing seasonality of Northern Hemisphere insolation. Two series of proxy data show the gradual cooling was interrupted by a two-step cold pulse that began 8500 years ago, and lasted about 700 years. Although this event is associated with the final deglaciation of Hudson Bay, there is no d18O minimum anywhere in the Labrador Sea, yet there is some evidence for it as far south as Cape Hatteras. Finally, although the 8200 year B.P. event has been implicated in decreasing North Atlantic ventilation, and hence widespread temperature depression on land and at sea, we find inconsistent evidence for a change at that time in deep ocean nutrient content at ~4 km water depth.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 298 data points
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2020-01-17
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 37 data points
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2020-01-17
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 21 data points
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