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  • 1
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    In:  Tectonophys., spec. iss., Washington, D.C., AGU, vol. 133, no. 3, pp. 287-304, pp. 2568, (ISSN: 1340-4202)
    Publication Date: 1987
    Keywords: Tectonics ; China ; Gravimetry, Gravitation ; Refraction seismics ; Seismicity ; Fault zone ; Geol. aspects
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2015-12-01
    Description: Next generation genomic technologies have made a significant contribution to the understanding of the genetic architecture of human neurodevelopmental disorders. Copy number variants (CNVs) play an important role in the genetics of intellectual disability (ID). For many CNVs, and copy number gains in particular, the responsible dosage-sensitive gene(s) have been hard to identify. We have collected 18 different interstitial microduplications and 1 microtriplication of Xq25. There were 15 affected individuals from 6 different families and 13 singleton cases, 28 affected males in total. The critical overlapping region involved the STAG2 gene, which codes for a subunit of the cohesin complex that regulates cohesion of sister chromatids and gene transcription. We demonstrate that STAG2 is the dosage-sensitive gene within these CNVs, as gains of STAG2 mRNA and protein dysregulate disease-relevant neuronal gene networks in cells derived from affected individuals. We also show that STAG2 gains result in increased expression of OPHN1 , a known X-chromosome ID gene. Overall, we define a novel cohesinopathy due to copy number gain of Xq25 and STAG2 in particular.
    Print ISSN: 0964-6906
    Electronic ISSN: 1460-2083
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2019
    Print ISSN: 1745-2473
    Electronic ISSN: 1745-2481
    Topics: Physics
    Published by Springer Nature
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2019
    Print ISSN: 1745-2473
    Electronic ISSN: 1745-2481
    Topics: Physics
    Published by Springer Nature
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2015-09-26
    Description: Mitochondria fulfill central functions in cellular energetics, metabolism, and signaling. The outer membrane translocator complex (the TOM complex) imports most mitochondrial proteins, but its architecture is unknown. Using a cross-linking approach, we mapped the active translocator down to single amino acid residues, revealing different transport paths for preproteins through the Tom40 channel. An N-terminal segment of Tom40 passes from the cytosol through the channel to recruit chaperones from the intermembrane space that guide the transfer of hydrophobic preproteins. The translocator contains three Tom40 beta-barrel channels sandwiched between a central alpha-helical Tom22 receptor cluster and external regulatory Tom proteins. The preprotein-translocating trimeric complex exchanges with a dimeric isoform to assemble new TOM complexes. Dynamic coupling of alpha-helical receptors, beta-barrel channels, and chaperones generates a versatile machinery that transports about 1000 different proteins.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Shiota, Takuya -- Imai, Kenichiro -- Qiu, Jian -- Hewitt, Victoria L -- Tan, Khershing -- Shen, Hsin-Hui -- Sakiyama, Noriyuki -- Fukasawa, Yoshinori -- Hayat, Sikander -- Kamiya, Megumi -- Elofsson, Arne -- Tomii, Kentaro -- Horton, Paul -- Wiedemann, Nils -- Pfanner, Nikolaus -- Lithgow, Trevor -- Endo, Toshiya -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Sep 25;349(6255):1544-8. doi: 10.1126/science.aac6428.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Biomedicine Discovery Institute and Department of Microbiology, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3800, Australia. Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602, Japan. ; Biotechnology Research Institute for Drug Discovery, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 2-4-7 Aomi, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0064, Japan. ; Institut fur Biochemie und Molekularbiologie, Universitat Freiburg, 79104 Freiburg, Germany. ; Biomedicine Discovery Institute and Department of Microbiology, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3800, Australia. ; Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics and Science for Life Laboratory, Stockholm University, Box 1031, 17121 Solna, Sweden. ; Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602, Japan. ; Institut fur Biochemie und Molekularbiologie, Universitat Freiburg, 79104 Freiburg, Germany. Centre for Biological Signalling Studies, Universitat Freiburg, 79104 Freiburg, Germany. ; Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602, Japan. Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kamigamo-motoyama, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555, Japan.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26404837" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Cytosol/metabolism ; Mitochondrial Membrane Transport Proteins/*chemistry/metabolism ; Molecular Chaperones ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Protein Multimerization ; Protein Structure, Secondary ; Protein Transport ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/*chemistry/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2010-09-03
    Description: China is the world's most populous country and a major emitter of greenhouse gases. Consequently, much research has focused on China's influence on climate change but somewhat less has been written about the impact of climate change on China. China experienced explosive economic growth in recent decades, but with only 7% of the world's arable land available to feed 22% of the world's population, China's economy may be vulnerable to climate change itself. We find, however, that notwithstanding the clear warming that has occurred in China in recent decades, current understanding does not allow a clear assessment of the impact of anthropogenic climate change on China's water resources and agriculture and therefore China's ability to feed its people. To reach a more definitive conclusion, future work must improve regional climate simulations-especially of precipitation-and develop a better understanding of the managed and unmanaged responses of crops to changes in climate, diseases, pests and atmospheric constituents.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Piao, Shilong -- Ciais, Philippe -- Huang, Yao -- Shen, Zehao -- Peng, Shushi -- Li, Junsheng -- Zhou, Liping -- Liu, Hongyan -- Ma, Yuecun -- Ding, Yihui -- Friedlingstein, Pierre -- Liu, Chunzhen -- Tan, Kun -- Yu, Yongqiang -- Zhang, Tianyi -- Fang, Jingyun -- England -- Nature. 2010 Sep 2;467(7311):43-51. doi: 10.1038/nature09364.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Ecology, College of Urban and Environmental Science, Key Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes of the Ministry of Education, and Center of Climate Research, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China. slpiao@pku.edu.cn〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20811450" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Agriculture ; China ; *Climate Change ; Conservation of Natural Resources ; *Economic Development ; Population Dynamics ; Water
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2014-01-28
    Description: To resolve the mechanisms that switch competition to cooperation is key to understanding biological organization. This is particularly relevant for intrasexual competition, which often leads to males harming females. Recent theory proposes that kin selection may modulate female harm by relaxing competition among male relatives. Here we experimentally manipulate the relatedness of groups of male Drosophila melanogaster competing over females to demonstrate that, as expected, within-group relatedness inhibits male competition and female harm. Females exposed to groups of three brothers unrelated to the female had higher lifetime reproductive success and slower reproductive ageing compared to females exposed to groups of three males unrelated to each other. Triplets of brothers also fought less with each other, courted females less intensively and lived longer than triplets of unrelated males. However, associations among brothers may be vulnerable to invasion by minorities of unrelated males: when two brothers were matched with an unrelated male, the unrelated male sired on average twice as many offspring as either brother. These results demonstrate that relatedness can profoundly affect fitness through its modulation of intrasexual competition, as flies plastically adjust sexual behaviour in a manner consistent with kin-selection theory.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Carazo, Pau -- Tan, Cedric K W -- Allen, Felicity -- Wigby, Stuart -- Pizzari, Tommaso -- Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jan 30;505(7485):672-5. doi: 10.1038/nature12949. Epub 2014 Jan 22.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Edward Grey Institute, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK [2]. ; Edward Grey Institute, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24463521" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Competitive Behavior/physiology ; *Cooperative Behavior ; Drosophila melanogaster/genetics/*physiology ; Female ; Heredity/physiology ; Longevity/genetics/physiology ; Male ; Models, Biological ; Reproduction/physiology ; Sexual Behavior, Animal/*physiology ; *Siblings
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2016-05-03
    Description: We analysed whole-genome sequences of 560 breast cancers to advance understanding of the driver mutations conferring clonal advantage and the mutational processes generating somatic mutations. We found that 93 protein-coding cancer genes carried probable driver mutations. Some non-coding regions exhibited high mutation frequencies, but most have distinctive structural features probably causing elevated mutation rates and do not contain driver mutations. Mutational signature analysis was extended to genome rearrangements and revealed twelve base substitution and six rearrangement signatures. Three rearrangement signatures, characterized by tandem duplications or deletions, appear associated with defective homologous-recombination-based DNA repair: one with deficient BRCA1 function, another with deficient BRCA1 or BRCA2 function, the cause of the third is unknown. This analysis of all classes of somatic mutation across exons, introns and intergenic regions highlights the repertoire of cancer genes and mutational processes operating, and progresses towards a comprehensive account of the somatic genetic basis of breast cancer.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Nik-Zainal, Serena -- Davies, Helen -- Staaf, Johan -- Ramakrishna, Manasa -- Glodzik, Dominik -- Zou, Xueqing -- Martincorena, Inigo -- Alexandrov, Ludmil B -- Martin, Sancha -- Wedge, David C -- Van Loo, Peter -- Ju, Young Seok -- Smid, Marcel -- Brinkman, Arie B -- Morganella, Sandro -- Aure, Miriam R -- Lingjaerde, Ole Christian -- Langerod, Anita -- Ringner, Markus -- Ahn, Sung-Min -- Boyault, Sandrine -- Brock, Jane E -- Broeks, Annegien -- Butler, Adam -- Desmedt, Christine -- Dirix, Luc -- Dronov, Serge -- Fatima, Aquila -- Foekens, John A -- Gerstung, Moritz -- Hooijer, Gerrit K J -- Jang, Se Jin -- Jones, David R -- Kim, Hyung-Yong -- King, Tari A -- Krishnamurthy, Savitri -- Lee, Hee Jin -- Lee, Jeong-Yeon -- Li, Yilong -- McLaren, Stuart -- Menzies, Andrew -- Mustonen, Ville -- O'Meara, Sarah -- Pauporte, Iris -- Pivot, Xavier -- Purdie, Colin A -- Raine, Keiran -- Ramakrishnan, Kamna -- Rodriguez-Gonzalez, F German -- Romieu, Gilles -- Sieuwerts, Anieta M -- Simpson, Peter T -- Shepherd, Rebecca -- Stebbings, Lucy -- Stefansson, Olafur A -- Teague, Jon -- Tommasi, Stefania -- Treilleux, Isabelle -- Van den Eynden, Gert G -- Vermeulen, Peter -- Vincent-Salomon, Anne -- Yates, Lucy -- Caldas, Carlos -- Veer, Laura Van't -- Tutt, Andrew -- Knappskog, Stian -- Tan, Benita Kiat Tee -- Jonkers, Jos -- Borg, Ake -- Ueno, Naoto T -- Sotiriou, Christos -- Viari, Alain -- Futreal, P Andrew -- Campbell, Peter J -- Span, Paul N -- Van Laere, Steven -- Lakhani, Sunil R -- Eyfjord, Jorunn E -- Thompson, Alastair M -- Birney, Ewan -- Stunnenberg, Hendrik G -- van de Vijver, Marc J -- Martens, John W M -- Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise -- Richardson, Andrea L -- Kong, Gu -- Thomas, Gilles -- Stratton, Michael R -- Nature. 2016 May 2. doi: 10.1038/nature17676.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK. ; East Anglian Medical Genetics Service, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge CB2 9NB, UK. ; Division of Oncology and Pathology, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund SE-223 81, Sweden. ; Theoretical Biology and Biophysics (T-6), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, New Mexico, USA. ; Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA. ; Department of Human Genetics, University of Leuven, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium. ; Department of Medical Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute and Cancer Genomics Netherlands, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam 3015CN, The Netherlands. ; Radboud University, Department of Molecular Biology, Faculty of Science, 6525GA Nijmegen, The Netherlands. ; European Molecular Biology Laboratory, European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD, UK. ; Department of Cancer Genetics, Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo 0310, Norway. ; K. G. Jebsen Centre for Breast Cancer Research, Institute for Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo 0310, Norway. ; Department of Computer Science, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. ; Gachon Institute of Genome Medicine and Science, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon, South Korea. ; Translational Research Lab, Centre Leon Berard, 28, rue Laennec, 69373 Lyon Cedex 08, France. ; Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; The Netherlands Cancer Institute, 1066 CX Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ; Breast Cancer Translational Research Laboratory, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Institut Jules Bordet, Bd de Waterloo 121, B-1000 Brussels, Belgium. ; Translational Cancer Research Unit, Center for Oncological Research, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium. ; Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. ; Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ; Department of Pathology, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, Ulsan University, Ulsan, South Korea. ; Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, South Korea. ; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Program and Clinic, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard., Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Institute for Bioengineering and Biopharmaceutical Research (IBBR), Hanyang University, Seoul, South Korea. ; Institut National du Cancer, Research Division, Clinical Research Department, 52 avenue Morizet, 92513 Boulogne-Billancourt, France. ; University Hospital of Minjoz, INSERM UMR 1098, Bd Fleming, Besancon 25000, France. ; Pathology Department, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee DD1 9SY, UK. ; Oncologie Senologie, ICM Institut Regional du Cancer, Montpellier, France. ; The University of Queensland, UQ Centre for Clinical Research and School of Medicine, Brisbane, Queensland 4029, Australia. ; Cancer Research Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland. ; IRCCS Istituto Tumori "Giovanni Paolo II", Bari, Italy. ; Department of Pathology, Centre Leon Berard, 28 rue Laennec, 69373 Lyon Cedex 08, France. ; Department of Pathology, GZA Hospitals Sint-Augustinus, Antwerp, Belgium. ; Institut Curie, Paris Sciences Lettres University, Department of Pathology and INSERM U934, 26 rue d'Ulm, 75248 Paris Cedex 05, France. ; Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, University of Cambridge, Li Ka Shing Centre, Robinson Way, Cambridge CB2 0RE, UK. ; Breast Cancer Now Research Unit, King's College London, London SE1 9RT, UK. ; Breast Cancer Now Toby Robins Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Research, London SW3 6JB, UK. ; Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, 5020 Bergen, Norway. ; Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, 5021 Bergen, Norway. ; National Cancer Centre Singapore, 11 Hospital Drive, 169610, Singapore. ; Singapore General Hospital, Outram Road, 169608, Singapore. ; Equipe Erable, INRIA Grenoble-Rhone-Alpes, 655, Avenue de l'Europe, 38330 Montbonnot-Saint Martin, France. ; Synergie Lyon Cancer, Centre Leon Berard, 28 rue Laennec, Lyon Cedex 08, France. ; Department of Genomic Medicine, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77230, USA. ; Department of Radiation Oncology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen 6525GA, The Netherlands. ; Pathology Queensland, The Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland 4029, Australia. ; Department of Breast Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1400 Pressler Street, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27135926" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 1999-12-03
    Description: The crystal structure of a complex involving the D10 T cell receptor (TCR), 16-residue foreign peptide antigen, and the I-Ak self major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule is reported at 3.2 angstrom resolution. The D10 TCR is oriented in an orthogonal mode relative to its peptide-MHC (pMHC) ligand, necessitated by the amino-terminal extension of peptide residues projecting from the MHC class II antigen-binding groove as part of a mini beta sheet. Consequently, the disposition of D10 complementarity-determining region loops is altered relative to that of most pMHCI-specific TCRs; the latter TCRs assume a diagonal orientation, although with substantial variability. Peptide recognition, which involves P-1 to P8 residues, is dominated by the Valpha domain, which also binds to the class II MHC beta1 helix. That docking is limited to one segment of MHC-bound peptide offers an explanation for epitope recognition and altered peptide ligand effects, suggests a structural basis for alloreactivity, and illustrates how bacterial superantigens can span the TCR-pMHCII surface.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Reinherz, E L -- Tan, K -- Tang, L -- Kern, P -- Liu, J -- Xiong, Y -- Hussey, R E -- Smolyar, A -- Hare, B -- Zhang, R -- Joachimiak, A -- Chang, H C -- Wagner, G -- Wang, J -- AI/CA37581/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI19807/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- GM56008/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1999 Dec 3;286(5446):1913-21.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory of Immunobiology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10583947" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antigens/*chemistry/immunology/metabolism ; Binding Sites ; CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology ; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology ; Conalbumin/chemistry/immunology ; Crystallization ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/immunology ; Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/*chemistry/immunology/metabolism ; Hydrogen Bonding ; Ligands ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred AKR ; Models, Molecular ; Oligopeptides/chemistry/immunology/metabolism ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Structure, Secondary ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, alpha-beta/*chemistry/immunology/metabolism ; Superantigens/immunology/metabolism ; Thymus Gland/cytology/immunology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2013-12-19
    Description: :  Biomedical Entity-Relationship eXplorer (BEReX) is a new biomedical knowledge integration, search and exploration tool. BEReX integrates eight popular databases (STRING, DrugBank, KEGG, PhamGKB, BioGRID, GO, HPRD and MSigDB) and delineates an integrated network by combining the information available from these databases. Users search the integrated network by entering key words, and BEReX returns a sub-network matching the key words. The resulting graph can be explored interactively. BEReX allows users to find the shortest paths between two remote nodes, find the most relevant drugs, diseases, pathways and so on related to the current network, expand the network by particular types of entities and relations and modify the network by removing or adding selected nodes. BEReX is implemented as a standalone Java application. Availability and implementation:  BEReX and a detailed user guide are available for download at our project Web site ( http://infos.korea.ac.kr/berex ). Contact:   kangj@korea.ac.kr Supplementary Information:   Supplementary methods and user guide are available at Bioinformatics online.
    Print ISSN: 1367-4803
    Electronic ISSN: 1460-2059
    Topics: Biology , Computer Science , Medicine
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