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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2004-02-21
    Description: The Sir2 deacetylase modulates organismal life-span in various species. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Sir2 increases longevity are largely unknown. We show that in mammalian cells, the Sir2 homolog SIRT1 appears to control the cellular response to stress by regulating the FOXO family of Forkhead transcription factors, a family of proteins that function as sensors of the insulin signaling pathway and as regulators of organismal longevity. SIRT1 and the FOXO transcription factor FOXO3 formed a complex in cells in response to oxidative stress, and SIRT1 deacetylated FOXO3 in vitro and within cells. SIRT1 had a dual effect on FOXO3 function: SIRT1 increased FOXO3's ability to induce cell cycle arrest and resistance to oxidative stress but inhibited FOXO3's ability to induce cell death. Thus, one way in which members of the Sir2 family of proteins may increase organismal longevity is by tipping FOXO-dependent responses away from apoptosis and toward stress resistance.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Brunet, Anne -- Sweeney, Lora B -- Sturgill, J Fitzhugh -- Chua, Katrin F -- Greer, Paul L -- Lin, Yingxi -- Tran, Hien -- Ross, Sarah E -- Mostoslavsky, Raul -- Cohen, Haim Y -- Hu, Linda S -- Cheng, Hwei-Ling -- Jedrychowski, Mark P -- Gygi, Steven P -- Sinclair, David A -- Alt, Frederick W -- Greenberg, Michael E -- NIHP30-HD18655/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- P01 NS35138-17/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2004 Mar 26;303(5666):2011-5. Epub 2004 Feb 19.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Neuroscience, Children's Hospital, and Department of Neurobiology, Center for Blood Research (CBR) Institute for Biomedical Research, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14976264" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Acetylation ; Animals ; Apoptosis ; Cell Cycle ; Cell Line ; Cell Nucleus/metabolism ; Cells, Cultured ; Cerebellum/cytology ; Forkhead Transcription Factors ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Gene Expression Regulation ; Histone Deacetylases/genetics/*metabolism ; Humans ; Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins ; Mice ; Mice, Knockout ; Neurons/cytology ; *Oxidative Stress ; Phosphorylation ; Proteins/genetics ; Recombinant Proteins/metabolism ; Sirtuin 1 ; Sirtuins/genetics/*metabolism ; Transcription Factors/genetics/*metabolism ; Transcription, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2008-03-14
    Description: The Sir2 deacetylase regulates chromatin silencing and lifespan in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In mice, deficiency for the Sir2 family member SIRT6 leads to a shortened lifespan and a premature ageing-like phenotype. However, the molecular mechanisms of SIRT6 function are unclear. SIRT6 is a chromatin-associated protein, but no enzymatic activity of SIRT6 at chromatin has yet been detected, and the identity of physiological SIRT6 substrates is unknown. Here we show that the human SIRT6 protein is an NAD+-dependent, histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) deacetylase that modulates telomeric chromatin. SIRT6 associates specifically with telomeres, and SIRT6 depletion leads to telomere dysfunction with end-to-end chromosomal fusions and premature cellular senescence. Moreover, SIRT6-depleted cells exhibit abnormal telomere structures that resemble defects observed in Werner syndrome, a premature ageing disorder. At telomeric chromatin, SIRT6 deacetylates H3K9 and is required for the stable association of WRN, the factor that is mutated in Werner syndrome. We propose that SIRT6 contributes to the propagation of a specialized chromatin state at mammalian telomeres, which in turn is required for proper telomere metabolism and function. Our findings constitute the first identification of a physiological enzymatic activity of SIRT6, and link chromatin regulation by SIRT6 to telomere maintenance and a human premature ageing syndrome.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2646112/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2646112/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Michishita, Eriko -- McCord, Ronald A -- Berber, Elisabeth -- Kioi, Mitomu -- Padilla-Nash, Hesed -- Damian, Mara -- Cheung, Peggie -- Kusumoto, Rika -- Kawahara, Tiara L A -- Barrett, J Carl -- Chang, Howard Y -- Bohr, Vilhelm A -- Ried, Thomas -- Gozani, Or -- Chua, Katrin F -- K08 AG028961/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- K08 AG028961-03/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG028867/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG028867-03/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM079641/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM079641-02/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2008 Mar 27;452(7186):492-6. doi: 10.1038/nature06736. Epub 2008 Mar 12.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Gerontology and Metabolism, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18337721" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Acetylation ; Cell Aging/genetics ; Cell Line ; Chromatin/genetics/*metabolism ; DNA Replication ; Exodeoxyribonucleases/metabolism ; Fibroblasts ; Histone Deacetylases/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Histones/chemistry/metabolism ; Humans ; Lysine/metabolism ; Phenotype ; Protein Binding ; RecQ Helicases/metabolism ; Sirtuins/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Telomerase/genetics/metabolism ; Telomere/genetics/*metabolism ; Werner Syndrome/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2012-06-23
    Description: Sirtuin proteins regulate diverse cellular pathways that influence genomic stability, metabolism and ageing. SIRT7 is a mammalian sirtuin whose biochemical activity, molecular targets and physiological functions have been unclear. Here we show that SIRT7 is an NAD(+)-dependent H3K18Ac (acetylated lysine 18 of histone H3) deacetylase that stabilizes the transformed state of cancer cells. Genome-wide binding studies reveal that SIRT7 binds to promoters of a specific set of gene targets, where it deacetylates H3K18Ac and promotes transcriptional repression. The spectrum of SIRT7 target genes is defined in part by its interaction with the cancer-associated E26 transformed specific (ETS) transcription factor ELK4, and comprises numerous genes with links to tumour suppression. Notably, selective hypoacetylation of H3K18Ac has been linked to oncogenic transformation, and in patients is associated with aggressive tumour phenotypes and poor prognosis. We find that deacetylation of H3K18Ac by SIRT7 is necessary for maintaining essential features of human cancer cells, including anchorage-independent growth and escape from contact inhibition. Moreover, SIRT7 is necessary for a global hypoacetylation of H3K18Ac associated with cellular transformation by the viral oncoprotein E1A. Finally, SIRT7 depletion markedly reduces the tumorigenicity of human cancer cell xenografts in mice. Together, our work establishes SIRT7 as a highly selective H3K18Ac deacetylase and demonstrates a pivotal role for SIRT7 in chromatin regulation, cellular transformation programs and tumour formation in vivo.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3412143/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3412143/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Barber, Matthew F -- Michishita-Kioi, Eriko -- Xi, Yuanxin -- Tasselli, Luisa -- Kioi, Mitomu -- Moqtaderi, Zarmik -- Tennen, Ruth I -- Paredes, Silvana -- Young, Nicolas L -- Chen, Kaifu -- Struhl, Kevin -- Garcia, Benjamin A -- Gozani, Or -- Li, Wei -- Chua, Katrin F -- 1018438-142/PHS HHS/ -- 3T32DK007217-36S1/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DP2OD007447/OD/NIH HHS/ -- GM 30186/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- HG 4558/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- K08 AG028961/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG028867/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM030186/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM079641/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32 CA009302/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U01 DA025956/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- U01 DA025956-01/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- U01DA025956/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Jul 5;487(7405):114-8. doi: 10.1038/nature11043.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22722849" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Acetylation ; Adenovirus E1A Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Animals ; Base Sequence ; Binding Sites ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Cell Proliferation ; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/genetics/*metabolism/pathology ; Chromatin/metabolism ; Contact Inhibition ; Disease Progression ; Histone Deacetylases/*metabolism ; Histones/*metabolism ; Humans ; Lysine/*metabolism ; Mice ; Neoplasm Transplantation ; Nucleotide Motifs ; Phenotype ; Promoter Regions, Genetic ; Repressor Proteins/metabolism ; Sirtuins/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Transcription, Genetic ; Transplantation, Heterologous ; ets-Domain Protein Elk-4/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2012-12-22
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Tasselli, Luisa -- Chua, Katrin F -- England -- Nature. 2012 Dec 20;492(7429):362-3. doi: 10.1038/492362a.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23257875" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic ; Glycolysis ; Humans ; Mice ; Neoplasms/*metabolism/*pathology ; Sirtuins/deficiency/*metabolism ; Tumor Suppressor Proteins/deficiency/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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