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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-06-06
    Description: This paper provides information on the products available at the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) mission. The GES DAAC provides measurements from the primary UARS mission, which extended from launch in September 1991 through September 2001. The ten instruments aboard UARS provide measurements of atmospheric trace gas species, dynamical variables, solar irradiance input, and particle energy flux. All standard Level 3 UARS products from all ten instruments are offered free to the public and science user community. The Level 3 data are geophysical parameters, which have been transformed into a common format and equally spaced along the measurement trajectory. The UARS data have been reprocessed several times over the years following improvements to the processing algorithms. The UARS data offered from the GES DAAC are the latest versions of each instrument. The UARS data may be accessed through the GES DAAC website at
    Keywords: Geophysics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2011-08-24
    Description: This paper reports results from NASA's Chemical Instrumentation and Test Evaluation (CITE 3) during which airborne measurements of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) from six instruments were intercompared. Represented by the six instruments are three fundamentally different detection principles (flame photometric, mass spectrometric, and electron capture after fluorination); three collection/preconcentration methods (cryogenic, gold wool absorption, and polymer absorbent); and three types of oxidant scrubbers (solid phase alkaline, aqueous reactor, and cotton). The measurements were made over the Atlantic Ocean in August/September 1989 during flights from NASA's Wallops Flight Center, Virginia, and Natal, Brazil. The majority of the intercomparisons are at DMS mixing ratios less than 50 pptv. Results show that instrument agreement is of the order of a few pptv for mixing ratios less than 50 pptv and to within about 15% above 50 pptv. Statistically significant (95% confidence) measurement biases were noted among some of the techniques. However, in all cases, any bias is small and within the accuracy of the measurements and prepared DMS standards. Thus, we conclude that the techniques intercompared during CITE 3 provide equally valid measurements of DMS in the range of a few pptv to 100 pptv (upper range of the intercomparisons).
    Keywords: ENVIRONMENT POLLUTION
    Type: Journal of Geophysical Research (ISSN 0148-0227); 98; D12; p. 23,373-23,388
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2011-08-24
    Description: This paper reports results of NASA's Chemical Instrumentation and Test Evaluation (CITE 3) during which airborne measurements for carbonyl sulfide (COS), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were intercompared. Instrumentation included a gas chromatograph using flame photometric detection (COS, H2S, and CS2), a gas chromatograph using mass spectrometric detection (COS) and CS2), a gas chromatograph using fluorination and subsequent SF6 detection via electron capture (COS and CS2), and the Natusch technique (H2S). The measurements were made over the Atlantic Ocean east of North and South America during flights from NASA's Wallops Flight Center, Virginia, and Natal, Brazil, in August/September 1989. Most of the intercomparisons for H2S and CS2 were at mixing ratios less than 25 pptv and less than 10 pptv, respectively, with a maximum mixing ratio of about 100 pptv and 50 pptv, respectively. Carbonyl sulfide intercomparisons were at mixing ratios between 400 and 600 pptv. Measurements were intercompared from data bases constructed from time periods of simultaneous or overlapping measurements. Agreement among the COS techniques averaged about 5%, and individual measurements were generally within 10%. For H2S and at mixing ratio greater than 25 pptv, the instruments agreed on average to about 15%. At mixing ratios less than 25 pptv the agreement was about 5 pptv. For CS2 (mixing ratios less than 50 pptv), two techniques agreed on average to about 4 pptv, and the third exhibited a bias (relative to the other two) that varied in the range of 3-7 pptv. CS2 mixing ratios over the ocean east of Natal as measured by the gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer technique were only a few pptv and were below the detection limits of the other two techniques. The CITE 3 data are used to estimate the current uncertainty associated with aircraft measurements of COS, H2S, and CS2 in the remote troposphere.
    Keywords: ENVIRONMENT POLLUTION
    Type: Journal of Geophysical Research (ISSN 0148-0227); 98; D12; p. 23,353-23,372
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2013-08-29
    Description: Micro-pulse lidar systems (MPL) were used to measure aerosol properties during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) 1999 field phase. Measurements were made from two platforms: the NOAA ship RN Ronald H. Brown, and the Kaashidhoo Climate Observatory (KCO) in the Maldives. Sunphotometers were used to provide aerosol optical depths (AOD) needed to calibrate the MPL. This study focuses on the height distribution and optical properties (at 523 nm) of aerosols observed during the campaign. The height of the highest aerosols (top height) was calculated and found to be below 4 km for most of the cruise. The marine boundary layer (MBL) top was calculated and found to be less than 1 km. MPL results were combined with air mass trajectories, radiosonde profiles of temperature and humidity, and aerosol concentration and optical measurements. Humidity varied from approximately 80% near the surface to 50% near the top height during the entire cruise. The average value and standard deviation of aerosol optical parameters were determined for characteristic air mass regimes. Marine aerosols in the absence of any continental influence were found to have an AOD of 0.05 +/- 0.03, an extinction-to-backscatter ratio (S-ratio) of 33 +/- 6 sr, and peak extinction values around 0.05/km (near the MBL top). The marine results are shown to be in agreement with previously measured and expected values. Polluted marine areas over the Indian Ocean, influenced by continental aerosols, had AOD values in excess of 0.2, S-ratios well above 40 sr, and peak extinction values approximately 0.20/km (near the MBL top). The polluted marine results are shown to be similar to previously published values for continental aerosols. Comparisons between MPL derived extinction near the ship (75 m) and extinction calculated at ship-level using scattering measured by a nephelometer and absorption using a PSAP were conducted. The comparisons indicated that the MPL algorithm (using a constant S-ratio throughout the lower troposphere) calculates extinction near the surface in agreement with the ship-level measurements only when the MBL aerosols are well mixed with aerosols above. Finally, a review of the MPL extinction profiles showed that the model of aerosol vertical extinction developed during an earlier INDOEX field campaign (at the Maldives) did not correctly describe the true vertical distribution over the greater Indian Ocean region. Using the average extinction profile and AOD obtained during marine conditions, a new model of aerosol vertical extinction was determined for marine atmospheres over the Indian Ocean. A new model of aerosol vertical extinction for polluted marine atmospheres was also developed using the average extinction profile and AOD obtained during marine conditions influenced by continental aerosols.
    Keywords: Geophysics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2013-08-29
    Description: During the Aerosols99 trans-Atlantic cruise from Norfolk, VA, to Cape Town, South Africa, daily ozonesondes were launched from the NOAA R/V Ronald H Brown between 17 January and 6 February l999. A composite of tropospheric ozone profiles along the latitudinal transect shows 4 zones, which are interpreted using correlative shipboard ozone, CO, water vapor, and overhead aerosol optical thickness measurements. Elevated ozone associated with biomass burning north of the ITCZ (Intertropical Convergence Zone) is prominent at 3-5 km from 10-0N, but even higher ozone (100 ppbv, 7-10 km) occurred south of the ITCZ, where it was not burning. Column-integrated tropospheric ozone was 44 Dobson Units (DU) in one sounding, 10 DU lower than the maximum in a January-February 1993 Atlantic cruise with ozonesondes [Weller et al., 1996]. TOMS tropospheric ozone shows elevated ozone extending throughout the tropical Atlantic in January 1999. Several explanations are considered. Back trajectories, satellite aerosol observations and shipboard tracers suggest a combination of convection and interhemispheric transport of ozone and/or ozone precursors, probably amplified by a lightning NO source over Africa.
    Keywords: Environment Pollution
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is one of the instruments aboard NASA's Aura satellite. It measures ozone total column and vertical profile, aerosols, clouds, and trace gases including NO2, SO2, HCHO, BrO, and OClO using absorption in the ultraviolet electromagnetic spectrum (280 - 400 nm). OMI Level-2G (L2G) products are based on the pixel-level OMI granule satellite measurements stored within global 0.25 deg. X 0.25 deg. grids, therefore they conserve all the Level 2 (L2) spatial and temporal details for 24 hours of scientific data in one file. The second Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA-2) is NASA's atmospheric reanalysis, using an upgraded version of Goddard Earth Observing System Model, version 5 (GEOS-5) data assimilation system. MERRA-2 includes aerosol data reanalysis and improved representations of stratospheric ozone, compared with its predecessor MERRA, in both instantaneous and time-averaged collections. It is found that simply comparing satellite Level-3 products might cause biases, due to lack of detailed temporal and original retrieval information. It is therefore preferable to inter-compare or implement satellite derived physical quantities directly with/to model assimilation with as high temporal and spatial resolutions as possible. This study will demonstrate utilization of OMI L2G daily aerosol and ozone products by comparing them with MERRA-2 hourly aerosol/ozone simulations, matched in both space and time aspects. Both OMI and MERRA-2 products are accessible online through NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data Information Services Center (GES DISC, https://disc.gsfc.nasa.gov/).
    Keywords: Earth Resources and Remote Sensing
    Type: GSFC-E-DAA-TN51980 , American Meteorological Society (AMS) Annual Meeting; 7-11 Jan. 2018; Austin, TX; United States
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  • 7
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    In:  CASI
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: No abstract available
    Keywords: Space Sciences (General)
    Type: JSC-CN-34625-1 , Open Innovation Summit; 28-29 Oct. 2015; Boston, MA; United States
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  • 8
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    In:  CASI
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: No abstract available
    Keywords: Space Sciences (General)
    Type: JSC-CN-34625-2 , Open Innovation Summit; 28-29 Oct. 2015; Boston, MA; United States
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: No abstract available
    Keywords: Documentation and Information Science; Exobiology
    Type: JSC-CN-33180 , Workshop on Planetary Protection Knowledge Gaps for Human Extraterrestrial Missions; 24-26 Mar. 2015; Moffett Field, CA; United States
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: Carbon disulfide (CS2) measurements were made over the western and equatorial North Atlantic Ocean and the northwestern and equatorial South Atlantic Ocean. Carbon disulfide was in the range 0.4-50 pptrv in the atmosphere of the western North Atlantic Ocean. Emissions from anthropogenic sources and wet lands were found to be important although anthropogenic sources were 4-6 times larger than biogenic sources. The flux of CS2 from eastern North America between 30 and 39 deg latitude was estimated to be 2 x 10(exp 8)g/yr or sulfur. The anthropogenic contribution was 1.8 x 10(exp 8)g/yr of sulfur whereas the contribution of marshes was 0.2 x 10(exp 8)g/yr of sulfur. Sources of CS2 at high latitudes in the northern hemisphere were comparatively weak. Carbon disulfide levels in the western South Atlantic Ocean between -5 and 1 deg latitude were in the range 0.2-6 pptrv. Most of the CS2 appeared to come from biomass burning in Africa. Carbon disulfide was much higher close to shore suggesting that the South American continent was a significant source although too few data were available to quantify it. On ferry lights from Wallops, Virginia to Natal, Brazil, CS2 levels at the ferry altitude of about 6 km averaged 1.2 pptrv. This background CS2 was adequate to account for all the carbonyl sulfide (OCS) in the atmosphere.
    Keywords: ENVIRONMENT POLLUTION
    Type: Journal of Geophysical Research (ISSN 0148-0227); 98; D12; p. 23,449-23,457
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