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  • 1
    Monograph available for loan
    Monograph available for loan
    London : The Geological Society
    Associated volumes
    Call number: 9/M 07.0421(303)
    In: Geological Society special publication
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: 192 S.
    ISBN: 9781862392571
    Series Statement: Geological Society special publication 303
    Classification: A.3.8.
    Location: Reading room
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
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  • 2
    Description / Table of Contents: Biogeochemical controls on palaeoceanographic environmental proxies: an introduction / William E. N. Austin and Rachael H. James / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 303, 1-2, 1 January 2008, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP303.1 --- Biogeochemical controls on palaeoceanographic environmental proxies: a review / Rachael H. James and William E. N. Austin / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 303, 3-32, 1 January 2008, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP303.2 --- Some fundamental features of biomineralization / R. J. P. Williams / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 303, 33-44, 1 January 2008, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP303.3 --- Vital effects and beyond: a modelling perspective on developing palaeoceanographical proxy relationships in foraminifera / Richard E. Zeebe, Jelle Bijma, Bärbel Hönisch, Abhijit Sanyal, Howard J. Spero and Dieter A. Wolf-Gladrow / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 303, 45-58, 1 January 2008, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP303.4 --- Foraminifer test preservation and diagenesis: comparison of high latitude Eocene sites / Paul N. Pearson and Catherine E. Burgess / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 303, 59-72, 1 January 2008, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP303.5 --- The influences of growth rates on planktic foraminifers as proxies for palaeostudies – a review / D. N. Schmidt, T. Elliott and S. A. Kasemann / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 303, 73-85, 1 January 2008, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP303.6 --- Fine-scale growth patterns in coral skeletons: biochemical control over crystallization of aragonite fibres and assessment of early diagenesis / J. P. Cuif, Y. Dauphin, A. Meibom, C. Rollion-Bard, M. Salomé, J. Susini and C. T. Williams / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 303, 87-96, 1 January 2008, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP303.7 --- Modern deep-sea benthic foraminifera: a brief review of their morphology-based biodiversity and trophic diversity / A. J. Gooday, H. Nomaki and H. Kitazato / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 303, 97-119, 1 January 2008, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP303.8 --- On the use of benthic foraminiferal δ13C in palaeoceanography: constraints from primary proxy relationships / Andreas Mackensen / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 303, 121-133, 1 January 2008, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP303.9 --- The carbon and oxygen stable isotopic composition of cultured benthic foraminifera / Daniel C. McCorkle, Joan M. Bernhard, Christopher J. Hintz, Jessica K. Blanks, G. Thomas Chandler and Timothy J. Shaw / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 303, 135-154, 1 January 2008, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP303.10 --- Seasonal dynamics of coastal water masses in a Scottish fjord and their potential influence on benthic foraminiferal shell geochemistry / Alix G. Cage and William E. N. Austin / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 303, 155-172, 1 January 2008, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP303.11 --- Isotopic variability in the intertidal acorn barnacle Semibalanus balanoides: a potentially novel sea-level proxy indicator / K. F. Craven, M. I. Bird, W. E. N. Austin and J. Wynn / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 303, 173-185, 1 January 2008, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP303.12
    Pages: Online-Ressource (192 Seiten) , Illustrationen, Diagramme, Karten
    ISBN: 9781862395510
    Language: English
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  • 3
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    In:  Geological Society Special Publication 303: 1-2.
    Publication Date: 2008-09-08
    Description: The current volume samples a selection of papers presented at the Geological Society of London meeting on ‘Biogeochemical Controls on Palaeoceanographic Proxies’, held at Burlington House, London, UK on 3–4 October 2005. The aim of the meeting was to bring together palaeontologists, geochemists and palaeoceanographers who could contribute evidence that, when considered together, would better constrain the proxies that are used for palaeoclimate reconstruction. An improved understanding and quantification of past climate change, and the processes that force climate to change, has a fundamental role to play in constraining model projections of future climate (e.g. Hegerl et al. 2006) but it remains a huge challenge. This is because key climate variables, such as temperature and ocean salinity, cannot be observed in a world which no longer exists, but must instead be teased from proxies in the geological and ice records. There are numerous proxy archives, but one of the most important, currently lying at the forefront of palaeoceanographic research, is the biogeochemical composition of sediment records. This publication consists of 11 papers which deal with various aspects of biogeochemical proxies and their interpretation in terms of past climate. Seven of these specifically focus on the Foraminifera. What are proxies? Primarily, these are biogenic components which have a close relationship to environmental parameters and may be identified as so-called ‘proxy variables’ (Wefer et al. 1999), providing measurable descriptors of key climatic and environmental variables. The methods commonly employed in palaeoceanography have ...
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  • 4
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    In:  Geological Society Special Publication 303: 3-32.
    Publication Date: 2008-09-08
    Description: Scientific observations of our oceans and climate go back no more than a couple of hundred years. Most of our information about the evolution of Earth's ocean-climate system relies instead on proxies - primarily measurements of sediment components that respond to changes in environmental parameters. This paper provides an overview of some of the most important biological and geochemical proxies and outlines their contribution to our understanding of the ocean-climate system. We also discuss some of the challenges that need to be overcome to obtain accurate records. These include: better understanding of the controls on the mechanisms of biomineralization; the impacts of post-depositional dissolution and diagenesis on primary proxy relationships; proxy validation; and analytical considerations.
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2016-06-07
    Description: Large quantities of methane are stored in hydrates and permafrost within shallow marine sediments in the Arctic Ocean. These reservoirs are highly sensitive to climate warming, but the fate of methane released from sediments is uncertain. Here, we review the principal physical and biogeochemical processes that regulate methane fluxes across the seabed, the fate of this methane in the water column, and potential for its release to the atmosphere. We find that, at present, fluxes of dissolved methane are significantly moderated by anaerobic and aerobic oxidation of methane. If methane fluxes increase then a greater proportion of methane will be transported by advection or in the gas phase, which reduces the efficiency of the methanotrophic sink. Higher freshwater discharge to Arctic shelf seas may increase stratification and inhibit transfer of methane gas to surface waters, although there is some evidence that increased stratification may lead to warming of sub-pycnocline waters, increasing the potential for hydrate dissociation. Loss of sea-ice is likely to increase wind speeds and sea-air exchange of methane will consequently increase. Studies of the distribution and cycling of methane beneath and within sea ice are limited, but it seems likely that the sea-air methane flux is higher during melting in seasonally ice-covered regions. Our review reveals that increased observations around especially the anaerobic and aerobic oxidation of methane, bubble transport, and the effects of ice cover, are required to fully understand the linkages and feedback pathways between climate warming and release of methane from marine sediments.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 6
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: James, Rachael H; Palmer, Martin R (2000): Marine geochemical cycles of the alkali elements and boron: The role of sediments. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 64(18), 3111-3122, https://doi.org/10.1016/S0016-7037(00)00418-X
    Publication Date: 2020-01-18
    Description: We have analysed the concentrations of Li, K, Rb, Cs, and B, and the isotopic ratios of Li and B of a suite of pore fluids recovered from ODP Sites 1037 (Leg 169; Escanaba Trough) and 1034 (Leg 169S; Saanich Inlet). In addition, we have analysed dissolved K, Rb, and Cs concentrations for estuarine mixing of the Ganges-Brahmaputra river system. Together, these data sets have been used to assess the role of sediments in the marine geochemical cycles of the alkali elements and boron. Uptake onto clay minerals during estuarine mixing removes 20-30% of the riverine input of dissolved Cs and Rb to the oceans. Prior to this study, the only other recognised sink of Rb and Cs was uptake during low-temperature alteration of the oceanic crust. Even with this additional sink there is an excess of inputs over outputs in their modern oceanic mass balance. Pore fluid data show that Li and Rb are transferred into marine sediments during early diagenesis. However, modeling of the Li isotope systematics of the pore fluids from Site 1037 shows that seawater Li taken up during marine sedimentation can be readily returned to solution in the presence of less hydrated cations, such as NH4+. This process also appears to result in high concentrations of pore fluid Cs (relative to local seawater) due to expulsion of adsorbed Cs from cation exchange sites. Flux calculations based on pore fluid data for a series of ODP sites indicate that early diagenesis of clay sediments removes around 8% of the modern riverine input of dissolved Li. Although NH4+-rich fluids do result in a flux of Cs to the oceans, on the global scale this input only augments the modern riverine Cs flux by ~3%. Nevertheless, this may have implications for the fate of radioactive Cs in the natural environment and waste repositories.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/zip, 2 datasets
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2020-01-18
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 108 data points
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2020-01-18
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 90 data points
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2020-01-18
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 40 data points
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2020-01-18
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 39 data points
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