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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2015-06-06
    Description: Old, multi-aged populations of riparian trees provide an opportunity to improve reconstructions of streamflow. Here, ring widths of 394 plains cottonwood ( Populus deltoides , ssp. monilifera ) trees in the North Unit of Theodore Roosevelt National Park, North Dakota, are used to reconstruct streamflow along the Little Missouri River (LMR), North Dakota, US. Different versions of the cottonwood chronology are developed by (1) age-curve standardization (ACS), using age-stratified samples and a single estimated curve of ring width against estimated ring age, and (2) time-curve standardization (TCS), using a subset of longer ring-width series individually detrended with cubic smoothing splines of width against year. The cottonwood chronologies are combined with the first principal component of four upland conifer chronologies developed by conventional methods to investigate the possible value of riparian tree-ring chronologies for streamflow reconstruction of the LMR. Regression modeling indicates that the statistical signal for flow is stronger in the riparian cottonwood than in the upland chronologies. The flow signal from cottonwood complements rather than repeats the signal from upland conifers and is especially strong in young trees (e.g. 5–35 years). Reconstructions using a combination of cottonwoods and upland conifers are found to explain more than 50% of the variance of LMR flow over a 1935–1990 calibration period and to yield reconstruction of flow to 1658. The low-frequency component of reconstructed flow is sensitive to the choice of standardization method for the cottonwood. In contrast to the TCS version, the ACS reconstruction features persistent low flows in the 19th century. Results demonstrate the value to streamflow reconstruction of riparian cottonwood and suggest that more studies are needed to exploit the low-frequency streamflow signal in densely sampled age-stratified stands of riparian trees.
    Print ISSN: 0959-6836
    Electronic ISSN: 1477-0911
    Topics: Geography , Geosciences
    Published by Sage
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-12-14
    Description: Ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine neurons in the brain's reward circuit have a crucial role in mediating stress responses, including determining susceptibility versus resilience to social-stress-induced behavioural abnormalities. VTA dopamine neurons show two in vivo patterns of firing: low frequency tonic firing and high frequency phasic firing. Phasic firing of the neurons, which is well known to encode reward signals, is upregulated by repeated social-defeat stress, a highly validated mouse model of depression. Surprisingly, this pathophysiological effect is seen in susceptible mice only, with no apparent change in firing rate in resilient individuals. However, direct evidence--in real time--linking dopamine neuron phasic firing in promoting the susceptible (depression-like) phenotype is lacking. Here we took advantage of the temporal precision and cell-type and projection-pathway specificity of optogenetics to show that enhanced phasic firing of these neurons mediates susceptibility to social-defeat stress in freely behaving mice. We show that optogenetic induction of phasic, but not tonic, firing in VTA dopamine neurons of mice undergoing a subthreshold social-defeat paradigm rapidly induced a susceptible phenotype as measured by social avoidance and decreased sucrose preference. Optogenetic phasic stimulation of these neurons also quickly induced a susceptible phenotype in previously resilient mice that had been subjected to repeated social-defeat stress. Furthermore, we show differences in projection-pathway specificity in promoting stress susceptibility: phasic activation of VTA neurons projecting to the nucleus accumbens (NAc), but not to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), induced susceptibility to social-defeat stress. Conversely, optogenetic inhibition of the VTA-NAc projection induced resilience, whereas inhibition of the VTA-mPFC projection promoted susceptibility. Overall, these studies reveal novel firing-pattern- and neural-circuit-specific mechanisms of depression.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3554860/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3554860/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Chaudhury, Dipesh -- Walsh, Jessica J -- Friedman, Allyson K -- Juarez, Barbara -- Ku, Stacy M -- Koo, Ja Wook -- Ferguson, Deveroux -- Tsai, Hsing-Chen -- Pomeranz, Lisa -- Christoffel, Daniel J -- Nectow, Alexander R -- Ekstrand, Mats -- Domingos, Ana -- Mazei-Robison, Michelle S -- Mouzon, Ezekiell -- Lobo, Mary Kay -- Neve, Rachael L -- Friedman, Jeffrey M -- Russo, Scott J -- Deisseroth, Karl -- Nestler, Eric J -- Han, Ming-Hu -- F31 MH095425/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- F32 MH096464/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- K99 MH094405/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH092306/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R25 GM064118/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32 MH020016/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- T32 MH087004/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- T32 MH096678/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jan 24;493(7433):532-6. doi: 10.1038/nature11713. Epub 2012 Dec 12.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pharmacology and Systems Therapeutics, Friedman Brain Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York 10029, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23235832" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Depression/etiology/*physiopathology ; Dopaminergic Neurons/*metabolism ; Food Preferences ; Male ; Mesencephalon/*cytology ; Mice ; Neural Pathways ; Nucleus Accumbens/physiology ; Optogenetics ; Phenotype ; Prefrontal Cortex/physiology ; *Social Behavior ; Stress, Psychological/complications/*physiopathology ; Sucrose/administration & dosage ; Time Factors ; Ventral Tegmental Area/physiology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2016-03-24
    Description: Targeted, temporally regulated neural modulation is invaluable in determining the physiological roles of specific neural populations or circuits. Here we describe a system for non-invasive, temporal activation or inhibition of neuronal activity in vivo and its use to study central nervous system control of glucose homeostasis and feeding in mice. We are able to induce neuronal activation remotely using radio waves or magnetic fields via Cre-dependent expression of a GFP-tagged ferritin fusion protein tethered to the cation-conducting transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) by a camelid anti-GFP antibody (anti-GFP-TRPV1). Neuronal inhibition via the same stimuli is achieved by mutating the TRPV1 pore, rendering the channel chloride-permeable. These constructs were targeted to glucose-sensing neurons in the ventromedial hypothalamus in glucokinase-Cre mice, which express Cre in glucose-sensing neurons. Acute activation of glucose-sensing neurons in this region increases plasma glucose and glucagon, lowers insulin levels and stimulates feeding, while inhibition reduces blood glucose, raises insulin levels and suppresses feeding. These results suggest that pancreatic hormones function as an effector mechanism of central nervous system circuits controlling blood glucose and behaviour. The method we employ obviates the need for permanent implants and could potentially be applied to study other neural processes or used to regulate other, even dispersed, cell types.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Stanley, Sarah A -- Kelly, Leah -- Latcha, Kaamashri N -- Schmidt, Sarah F -- Yu, Xiaofei -- Nectow, Alexander R -- Sauer, Jeremy -- Dyke, Jonathan P -- Dordick, Jonathan S -- Friedman, Jeffrey M -- GM067545/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM095654/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- MH105941/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U01 MH105941/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Mar 31;531(7596):647-50. doi: 10.1038/nature17183. Epub 2016 Mar 23.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Department of Chemical &Biological Engineering, Center for Biotechnology &Interdisciplinary Studies, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180, USA. ; Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, New York, New York 10065, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27007848" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Blood Glucose/*metabolism ; Eating/*physiology ; Ferritins/genetics/metabolism ; Glucagon/blood ; Glucokinase/metabolism ; Homeostasis ; Hypoglycemia/metabolism ; Insulin/blood ; Integrases/metabolism ; *Magnetic Fields ; Mice ; Neural Inhibition ; Neurons/*physiology ; Pancreatic Hormones/metabolism ; *Radio Waves ; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; TRPV Cation Channels/genetics/metabolism ; Time Factors ; Ventromedial Hypothalamic Nucleus/*cytology/*physiology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2013-04-27
    Description: [1]  The spatial distribution of riparian vegetation can strongly influence the geomorphic evolution of dryland rivers during large floods. We present the results of an airborne lidar differencing study that quantifies the topographic change that occurred along a 12 km reach of the Lower Rio Puerco, New Mexico, during an extreme event in 2006. Extensive erosion of the channel banks took place immediately upstream of the study area, where tamarisk and sandbar willow had been removed. Within the densely vegetated study reach, we measure a net volumetric change of 578,050 ± ~490,000 m 3 , with 88.3% of the total aggradation occurring along the floodplain and channel and 76.7% of the erosion focusing on the vertical valley walls. The sediment derived from the devegetated reach deposited within the first 3.6 km of the study area, with depth decaying exponentially with distance downstream. Elsewhere, floodplain sediments were primarily sourced from the erosion of valley walls. Superimposed on this pattern are the effects of vegetation and valley morphology on sediment transport. Sediment thickness is seen to be uniform among sandbar willows and highly variable within tamarisk groves. These reach-scale patterns of sedimentation observed in the lidar differencing likely reflect complex interactions of vegetation, flow, and sediment at the scale of patches to individual plants.
    Print ISSN: 0148-0227
    Topics: Geosciences , Physics
    Published by Wiley on behalf of American Geophysical Union (AGU).
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  • 5
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 1985-06-14
    Description: The static structure of hemoglobin and its functional properties are very well characterized. It is still not known how energy is stored and used within the structure of the protein to promote function and functional diversity. An essential part of this question is understanding the mechanism through which the overall protein structure (quaternary structure) couples to the local environment about the oxygen binding sites. Time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy has been used to probe the vibrational degrees of the freedom of the binding site as a function of protein structure. Comparison of the spectra from both equilibrium and transient forms of deoxy hemoglobin from a variety of mammalian, reptilian, and fish hemoglobins reveals that for each quaternary structure there exist two tertiary states stabilized by the presence or absence of an iron-bound ligand. Pulse-probe Raman experiments show that for photodissociated, ligated hemoglobins the local tertiary structure relaxes at a solution-dependent rate extending from tens of nanoseconds to microseconds. In this local environment, the linkage between the iron and the proximal histidine proves to be the single observed structural feature that responds in a systematic and substantial manner to structural changes in the protein. The additional finding of a correlation between the frequency of the iron-proximal histidine stretching motion (nu Fe-His) and various parameters of ligand reactivity, including geminate recombination, implicates the associated localized structural element in the mechanism of protein control of ligand binding. On the basis of these and related finds, a model is presented to account for both coarse and fine control of ligand binding by the protein structure.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Friedman, J M -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1985 Jun 14;228(4705):1273-80.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4001941" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Allosteric Regulation ; Animals ; Carboxyhemoglobin ; Cold Temperature ; *Hemoglobins ; Histidine ; Humans ; Hydrogen-Ion Concentration ; Iron ; *Oxyhemoglobins ; Protein Conformation ; Spectrum Analysis, Raman ; Structure-Activity Relationship ; Thermodynamics
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2002-07-13
    Description: Leptin elicits a metabolic response that cannot be explained by its anorectic effects alone. To examine the mechanism underlying leptin's metabolic actions, we used transcription profiling to identify leptin-regulated genes in ob/ob liver. Leptin was found to specifically repress RNA levels and enzymatic activity of hepatic stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1), which catalyzes the biosynthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids. Mice lacking SCD-1 were lean and hypermetabolic. ob/ob mice with mutations in SCD-1 were significantly less obese than ob/ob controls and had markedly increased energy expenditure. ob/ob mice with mutations in SCD-1 had histologically normal livers with significantly reduced triglyceride storage and VLDL (very low density lipoprotein) production. These findings suggest that down-regulation of SCD-1 is an important component of leptin's metabolic actions.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Cohen, Paul -- Miyazaki, Makoto -- Socci, Nicholas D -- Hagge-Greenberg, Aaron -- Liedtke, Wolfgang -- Soukas, Alexander A -- Sharma, Ratnendra -- Hudgins, Lisa C -- Ntambi, James M -- Friedman, Jeffrey M -- GM07739/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01-DK41096/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2002 Jul 12;297(5579):240-3.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Center for Studies in Physics and Biology, Rogosin Institute, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12114623" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Body Weight ; Crosses, Genetic ; Down-Regulation ; Eating ; Energy Metabolism ; Female ; Gene Expression ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Leptin/genetics/*physiology ; Lipid Metabolism ; Lipids/analysis ; Lipoproteins, VLDL/metabolism ; Liver/*enzymology/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Obese ; Microsomes, Liver/enzymology ; Mutation ; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis ; Oxygen Consumption ; RNA, Messenger/genetics/metabolism ; Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase/genetics/*metabolism ; Vacuoles/chemistry/ultrastructure ; *Weight Loss
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
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    Unknown
    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2003-02-08
    Description: In their efforts to lose weight, obese individuals may be fighting a powerful set of evolutionary forces honed in an environment drastically different from that of today.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Friedman, Jeffrey M -- R01-DK41096/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2003 Feb 7;299(5608):856-8.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Rockefeller University, 1230 New York Avenue, New York, NY 10021. USA. friedj@mail.rockefeller.edu〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12574619" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adipose Tissue/metabolism ; Body Mass Index ; Body Weight ; Diet ; Energy Intake ; Energy Metabolism ; Feeding Behavior ; Female ; Genes ; Homeostasis ; Humans ; Hunger ; Incidence ; Leptin/metabolism/therapeutic use ; Life Style ; Male ; *Obesity/epidemiology/genetics/physiopathology/prevention & control ; Public Health ; Selection, Genetic ; United States/epidemiology ; Weight Loss
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2004-04-06
    Description: The fat-derived hormone leptin regulates energy balance in part by modulating the activity of neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. To study the intrinsic activity of these neurons and their responses to leptin, we generated mice that express distinct green fluorescent proteins in these two neuronal types. Leptin-deficient (ob/ob) mice differed from wild-type mice in the numbers of excitatory and inhibitory synapses and postsynaptic currents onto neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin neurons. When leptin was delivered systemically to ob/ob mice, the synaptic density rapidly normalized, an effect detectable within 6 hours, several hours before leptin's effect on food intake. These data suggest that leptin-mediated plasticity in the ob/ob hypothalamus may underlie some of the hormone's behavioral effects.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Pinto, Shirly -- Roseberry, Aaron G -- Liu, Hongyan -- Diano, Sabrina -- Shanabrough, Marya -- Cai, Xiaoli -- Friedman, Jeffrey M -- Horvath, Tamas L -- DK060711/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- F32DK61176/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- F32NS046921/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK041096/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK061619/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- RR014451/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2004 Apr 2;304(5667):110-5.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15064421" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Arcuate Nucleus of Hypothalamus/cytology/*physiology ; Body Weight/drug effects ; Eating ; Evoked Potentials ; Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials ; *Feeding Behavior/drug effects ; Ghrelin ; Glutamic Acid/analysis ; Green Fluorescent Proteins ; In Vitro Techniques ; Leptin/genetics/pharmacology/*physiology ; Luminescent Proteins/analysis ; Mice ; Mice, Obese ; Mice, Transgenic ; Neuronal Plasticity/*physiology ; Neurons/drug effects/*physiology ; Neuropeptide Y/genetics/physiology ; Patch-Clamp Techniques ; Peptide Hormones/pharmacology ; Pro-Opiomelanocortin/genetics/physiology ; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/analysis ; Synapses/chemistry/ultrastructure ; Tetrodotoxin/pharmacology ; Transgenes ; gamma-Aminobutyric Acid/analysis
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2012-05-05
    Description: Medical applications of nanotechnology typically focus on drug delivery and biosensors. Here, we combine nanotechnology and bioengineering to demonstrate that nanoparticles can be used to remotely regulate protein production in vivo. We decorated a modified temperature-sensitive channel, TRPV1, with antibody-coated iron oxide nanoparticles that are heated in a low-frequency magnetic field. When local temperature rises, TRPV1 gates calcium to stimulate synthesis and release of bioengineered insulin driven by a Ca(2+)-sensitive promoter. Studying tumor xenografts expressing the bioengineered insulin gene, we show that exposure to radio waves stimulates insulin release from the tumors and lowers blood glucose in mice. We further show that cells can be engineered to synthesize genetically encoded ferritin nanoparticles and inducibly release insulin. These approaches provide a platform for using nanotechnology to activate cells.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3646550/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3646550/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Stanley, Sarah A -- Gagner, Jennifer E -- Damanpour, Shadi -- Yoshida, Mitsukuni -- Dordick, Jonathan S -- Friedman, Jeffrey M -- R01 GM095654/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 May 4;336(6081):604-8. doi: 10.1126/science.1216753.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22556257" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Bioengineering ; Blood Glucose/*analysis ; Calcium/*metabolism ; Embryonic Stem Cells/metabolism ; Epitopes ; *Ferric Compounds ; Ferritins/administration & dosage/genetics/metabolism ; HEK293 Cells ; Hot Temperature ; Humans ; Insulin/blood/genetics/*metabolism ; Male ; *Metal Nanoparticles ; Mice ; Mice, Nude ; Neoplasm Transplantation ; Neoplasms, Experimental/blood/pathology ; PC12 Cells ; *Radio Waves ; Rats ; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/administration & dosage ; TRPV Cation Channels/genetics/immunology/*metabolism ; Transfection ; Transplantation, Heterologous
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 1982-12-17
    Description: Low-frequency resonance Raman spectra of transient hemoglobin species were observed within 10 nanoseconds of photolysis. The Raman frequencies of the iron-proximal histidine stretching mode for transient species having either the R or the T quaternary structure are higher than in the corresponding deoxy species. The observed frequency difference in the iron-histidine mode between the R- and T- state transients indicates that there are quaternary structure-dependent protein forces on the iron-histidine bond in the liganded hemoglobins. These differences are interpreted in terms of changes in the tilt of the histidine with respect to the heme plane.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Friedman, J M -- Rousseau, D L -- Ondrias, M R -- Stepnoski, R A -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1982 Dec 17;218(4578):1244-6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7146910" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Carboxyhemoglobin ; Heme ; *Hemoglobins ; Histidine ; Humans ; Iron ; Motion ; Myoglobin ; Photolysis ; Spectrum Analysis, Raman
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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