ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2019-07-10
    Description: To support the need for increased flexibility and capacity in the future National Airspace System, NASA is pursuing an approach that distributes air traffic separation and management tasks to both airborne and ground-based systems. Details of the distributed operations and the benefits and technical challenges of such a system are discussed. Technology requirements and research issues are outlined, and NASA s approach for establishing concept feasibility, which includes development of the airborne automation necessary to support the concept, is described.
    Keywords: Research and Support Facilities (Air)
    Type: AIAA Paper 99-3989
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2019-07-12
    Description: The Terrain Portrayal for Head-Down Displays (TP-HDD) simulation experiment addressed multiple objectives involving twelve display concepts (two baseline concepts without terrain and ten synthetic vision system (SVS) variations), four evaluation maneuvers (two en route and one approach maneuver, plus a rare-event scenario), and three pilot group classifications. The TP-HDD SVS simulation was conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center's (LaRC's) General Aviation WorkStation (GAWS) facility. The results from this simulation establish the relationship between terrain portrayal fidelity and pilot situation awareness, workload, stress, and performance and are published in the NASA TP entitled Terrain Portrayal for Synthetic Vision Systems Head-Down Displays Evaluation Results. This is a collection of pilot comments during each run of the TP-HDD simulation experiment. These comments are not the full transcripts, but a condensed version where only the salient remarks that applied to the scenario, the maneuver, or the actual research itself were compiled.
    Keywords: Aeronautics (General)
    Type: NASA/TP-2007-214864/SUPPL1 , L-19336/SUPPL1
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2019-07-12
    Description: A critical component of SVS displays is the appropriate presentation of terrain to the pilot. At the time of this study, the relationship between the complexity of the terrain presentation and resulting enhancements of pilot SA and pilot performance had been largely undefined. The terrain portrayal for SVS head-down displays (TP-HDD) simulation examined the effects of two primary elements of terrain portrayal on the primary flight display (PFD): variations of digital elevation model (DEM) resolution and terrain texturing. Variations in DEM resolution ranged from sparsely spaced (30 arc-sec) to very closely spaced data (1 arc-sec). Variations in texture involved three primary methods: constant color, elevation-based generic, and photo-realistic, along with a secondary depth cue enhancer in the form of a fishnet grid overlay.
    Keywords: Aeronautics (General)
    Type: NASA/TP-2007-214864 , L-19222
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) displays provide pilots with a continuous view of terrain combined with integrated guidance symbology in an effort to increase situation awareness (SA) and decrease workload during operations in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). It is hypothesized that SVS displays can replicate the safety and operational flexibility of flight in Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC), regardless of actual out-the-window (OTW) visibility or time of day. Significant progress has been made towards evolving SVS displays as well as demonstrating their ability to increase SA compared to conventional avionics in a variety of conditions. While a substantial amount of data has been accumulated demonstrating the capabilities of SVS displays, the ability of SVS to replicate the safety and operational flexibility of VMC flight performance in all visibility conditions is unknown to any specific degree. In order to more fully quantify the relationship of flight operations in IMC with SVS displays to conventional operations conducted in VMC, a fundamental comparison to current day general aviation (GA) flight instruments was warranted. Such a comparison could begin to establish the extent to which SVS display concepts are capable of maintaining an "equivalent level of safety" with the round dials they could one day replace, for both current and future operations. A combination of subjective and objective data measures were used to quantify the relationship between selected components of safety that are associated with flying an approach. Four information display methods ranging from a "round dials" baseline through a fully integrated SVS package that includes terrain, pathway based guidance, and a strategic navigation display, were investigated in this high fidelity simulation experiment. In addition, a broad spectrum of pilots, representative of the GA population, were employed for testing in an attempt to enable greater application of the results and determine if "equivalent levels of safety" are achievable through the incorporation of SVS technology regardless of a pilot's flight experience.
    Keywords: Aircraft Communications and Navigation
    Type: SPIE Defense and Security Symposium 2005; 28 Mar. - 1 Apr. 2005; Orlando, FL; United States
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: Spatial disorientation induced by inadvertent flight into instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) continues to be a leading cause of fatal accidents in general aviation. The Synthetic Vision Systems General Aviation (SVS-GA) research element, an integral part of NASA s Aviation Safety and Security Program (AvSSP), is investigating a revolutionary display technology designed to mitigate low visibility events such as controlled flight into terrain (CFIT) and low-visibility loss of control (LVLoC). The integrated SVS Primary Flight Display (SVS-PFD) utilizes computer generated 3-dimensional imagery of the surrounding terrain augmented with flight path guidance symbology. This unique combination will provide GA pilots with an accurate representation of their environment and projection of their flight path, regardless of time of day or out-the-window (OTW) visibility. The initial Symbology Development for Head-Down Displays (SD-HDD) simulation experiment examined 16 display configurations on a centrally located high-resolution PFD installed in NASA s General Aviation Work Station (GAWS) flight simulator. The results of the experiment indicate that situation awareness (SA) can be enhanced without having a negative impact on flight technical error (FTE), by providing a general aviation pilot with an integrated SVS display to use when OTW visibility is obscured.
    Keywords: Avionics and Aircraft Instrumentation
    Type: Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 48th Annual Meeting; 20-24 Sep. 2004; New Orleans, LA; United States
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: The Synthetic Vision Systems General Aviation (SVS-GA) element of NASA's Aviation Safety Program is developing technology to eliminate low visibility induced General Aviation (GA) accidents through the application of synthetic vision techniques. SVS displays present computer generated 3-dimensional imagery of the surrounding terrain to greatly enhance pilot's situation awareness (SA), reducing or eliminating Controlled Flight into Terrain (CFIT), as well as Low-Visibility Loss of Control (LVLOC) accidents. In addition to substantial safety benefits, SVS displays have many potential operational benefits that can lead to flight in instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) resembling those conducted in visual meteorological conditions (VMC). Potential benefits could include lower landing minimums, more approach options, reduced training time, etc. SVS conducted research will develop display concepts providing the pilot with an unobstructed view of the outside terrain, regardless of weather conditions and time of day. A critical component of SVS displays is the appropriate presentation of terrain to the pilot. The relationship between the realism of the terrain presentation and resulting enhancements of pilot SA and pilot performance has been largely undefined. Comprised of coordinated simulation and flight test efforts, the terrain portrayal for head-down displays (TP-HDD) test series examined the effects of two primary elements of terrain portrayal: variations of digital elevation model (DEM) resolution and terrain texturing. Variations in DEM resolution ranged from sparsely spaced (30 arc-sec/2,953ft) to very closely spaced data (1 arc-sec/98 ft). Variations in texture involved three primary methods: constant color, elevation-based generic, and photo-realistic, along with a secondary depth cue enhancer in the form of a fishnet grid overlay. The TP-HDD test series was designed to provide comprehensive data to enable design trades to optimize all SVS applications, as well as develop requirements and recommendations to facilitate the implementation and certification of SVS displays. The TP-HDD flight experiment utilized the NASA LaRC Cessna 206 Stationaire and evaluated eight terrain portrayal concepts in an effort to confirm and extend results from the previously conducted TP-HDD simulation experiment. A total of 15 evaluation pilots, of various qualifications, accumulated over 75 hours of dedicated research flight time at Newport News (PHF) and Roanoke (ROA), VA, airports from August through October, 2002. This report will present results from the portion of testing conducted at Roanoke, VA.
    Keywords: Air Transportation and Safety
    Type: 22nd Digital Avionics Systems Conference; 12-16 Oct. 2003; Indianapolis, IN; United States
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: Because restricted visibility has been implicated in the majority of commercial and general aviation accidents, solutions will need to focus on how to enhance safety during instrument meteorological conditions (IMC). The NASA Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) project is developing technologies to help achieve these goals through the synthetic presentation of how the outside world would look to the pilot if vision were not reduced. The potential safety outcome would be a significant reduction in several accident categories, such as controlled-flight-into-terrain (CFIT), that have restricted visibility as a causal factor. The paper describes two experiments that demonstrated the efficacy of synthetic vision technology to prevent CFIT accidents for both general aviation and commercial aircraft.
    Keywords: Air Transportation and Safety
    Type: 47th Annual Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Meeting; 13-17 Oct. 2003; Denver, CO; United States
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: NASA Langley Research Center conducted flight tests at the Eagle County, Colorado airport to evaluate synthetic vision concepts. Three display concepts (size 'A' head-down, size 'X' head-down, and head-up displays) and two texture concepts (photo, generic) were assessed for situation awareness and flight technical error / performance while making approaches to Runway 25 and Runway 07 and simulated engine-out Cottonwood 2 and KREMM departures. The results of the study confirm the retrofit capability of the HUD and Size 'A' SVS concepts to significantly improve situation awareness and performance over current EFIS glass and non-glass instruments for difficult approaches in terrain-challenged environments.
    Keywords: Cybernetics, Artificial Intelligence and Robotics
    Type: 46th Human Factors and Ergonomic Society Meeting; 30 Sep. - 4 Oct. 2002; Baltimore, MD; United States
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: The General Aviation Element of the Aviation Safety Program's Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) Project is developing technology to eliminate low visibility induced General Aviation (GA) accidents. SVS displays present computer generated 3-dimensional imagery of the surrounding terrain on the Primary Flight Display (PFD) to greatly enhance pilot's situation awareness (SA), reducing or eliminating Controlled Flight into Terrain, as well as Low-Visibility Loss of Control accidents. SVS-conducted research is facilitating development of display concepts that provide the pilot with an unobstructed view of the outside terrain, regardless of weather conditions and time of day. A critical component of SVS displays is the appropriate presentation of terrain to the pilot. An experimental study has been conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to explore and quantify the relationship between the realism of the terrain presentation and resulting enhancements of pilot SA and pilot performance. Composed of complementary simulation and flight test efforts, Terrain Portrayal for Head-Down Displays (TP-HDD) experiments will help researchers evaluate critical terrain portrayal concepts. The experimental effort is to provide data to enable design trades that optimize SVS applications, as well as develop requirements and recommendations to facilitate the certification process. This paper focuses on the experimental set-up and preliminary qualitative results of the TP-HDD simulation experiment. In this experiment a fixed based flight simulator was equipped with various types of Head Down flight displays, ranging from conventional round dials (typical of most GA aircraft) to glass cockpit style PFD's. The variations of the PFD included an assortment of texturing and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) resolution combinations. A test matrix of 10 terrain display configurations (in addition to the baseline displays) were evaluated by 27 pilots of various backgrounds and experience levels. Qualitative (questionnaires) and quantitative (pilot performance and physiological) data were collected during the experimental runs. Preliminary results indicate that all of the evaluation pilots favored SVS displays over standard gauges, in terms of terrain awareness, SA, and perceived pilot performance. Among the terrain portrayal concepts tested, most pilots preferred the higher-resolution DEM. In addition, with minimal training, low-hour VFR evaluation pilots were able to negotiate a precision approach using SVS displays with a tunnel in the sky guidance concept.
    Keywords: Nonmetallic Materials
    Type: International Advanced Aviation Technologies Conference; 20-23 Aug. 2002; Anchorage, AK; United States
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: The General Aviation Element of the Aviation Safety Program's Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) Project is developing technology to eliminate low visibility induced General Aviation (GA) accidents. SVS displays present computer generated 3-dimensional imagery of the surrounding terrain on the Primary Flight Display (PFD) to greatly enhance pilot's situation awareness (SA), reducing or eliminating Controlled Flight into Terrain, as well as Low-Visibility Loss of Control accidents. SVS-conducted research is facilitating development of display concepts that provide the pilot with an unobstructed view of the outside terrain, regardless of weather conditions and time of day. A critical component of SVS displays is the appropriate presentation of terrain to the pilot. An experimental study is being conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to explore and quantify the relationship between the realism of the terrain presentation and resulting enhancements of pilot SA and performance. Composed of complementary simulation and flight test efforts, Terrain Portrayal for Head-Down Displays (TP-HDD) experiments will help researchers evaluate critical terrain portrayal concepts. The experimental effort is to provide data to enable design trades that optimize SVS applications, as well as develop requirements and recommendations to facilitate the certification process. In this part of the experiment a fixed based flight simulator was equipped with various types of Head Down flight displays, ranging from conventional round dials (typical of most GA aircraft) to glass cockpit style PFD's. The variations of the PFD included an assortment of texturing and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) resolution combinations. A test matrix of 10 terrain display configurations (in addition to the baseline displays) were evaluated by 27 pilots of various backgrounds and experience levels. Qualitative (questionnaires) and quantitative (pilot performance and physiological) data were collected during the experimental runs. This paper focuses on the experimental set-up and final physiological results of the TP-HDD simulation experiment. The physiological measures of skin temperature, heart rate, and muscle response, show a decreased engagement (while using the synthetic vision displays as compared to the baseline conventional display) of the sympathetic and somatic nervous system responses which, in turn, indicates a reduced level of mental workload. This decreased level of workload is expected to enable improvement in the pilot's situation and terrain awareness.
    Keywords: Research and Support Facilities (Air)
    Type: Rept-2001-01-2970 , 2002 SAE World Aviation Congress and Display; 5-7 Nov. 2002; Phoenix, AZ; United States
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...