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  • 1
    Keywords: Atlantic ; North Atlantic ; Greenland ; Iceland ; geochronology ; volcanism ; crustal structure
    Description / Table of Contents: The NE Atlantic region: a reappraisal of crustal structure, tectonostratigraphy and magmatic evolution – an introduction to the NAG-TEC project / Gwenn Péron-Pinvidic, John R. Hopper, Martyn Stoker, Carmen Gaina, Thomas Funck, Uni E. Árting and Johannes Cornelis Doornenbal / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 447, 1-10, 12 July 2017, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP447.17 --- Stratigraphy --- An overview of the Upper Palaeozoic–Mesozoic stratigraphy of the NE Atlantic region / M. S. Stoker, M. A. Stewart, P. M. Shannon, M. Bjerager, T. Nielsen, A. Blischke, B. O. Hjelstuen, C. Gaina, K. McDermott and J. Ólavsdóttir / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 447, 11-68, 11 August 2016, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP447.2 --- Geochronology and volcanism --- Compilation and appraisal of geochronological data from the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP) / Camilla M. Wilkinson, Morgan Ganerød, Bart W. H. Hendriks and Elizabeth A. Eide / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 447, 69-103, 8 November 2016, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP447.10 --- Regional distribution of volcanism within the North Atlantic Igneous Province / Jim Á Horni, John R. Hopper, Anett Blischke, Wolfram H. Geisler, Margaret Stewart, Kenneth McDermott, Maria Judge, Ögmundur Erlendsson and Uni Árting / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 447, 105-125, 11 July 2017, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP447.18 --- The Greenland–Iceland–Faroe Ridge Complex / Árni Hjartarson, Ögmundur Erlendsson and Anett Blischke / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 447, 127-148, 19 April 2017, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP447.14 --- Seismic volcanostratigraphy of the NE Greenland continental margin / Wolfram H. Geissler, Carmen Gaina, John R. Hopper, Thomas Funck, Anett Blischke, Uni Arting, Jim á Horni, Gwenn Péron-Pinvidic and Mansour M. Abdelmalak / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 447, 149-170, 14 December 2016, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP447.11 --- Crustal structure --- A review of the NE Atlantic conjugate margins based on seismic refraction data / Thomas Funck, Ögmundur Erlendsson, Wolfram H. Geissler, Sofie Gradmann, Geoffrey S. Kimbell, Kenneth McDermott and Uni K. Petersen / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 447, 171-205, 12 October 2016, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP447.9 --- Moho and basement depth in the NE Atlantic Ocean based on seismic refraction data and receiver functions / Thomas Funck, Wolfram H. Geissler, Geoffrey S. Kimbell, Sofie Gradmann, Ögmundur Erlendsson, Kenneth McDermott and Uni K. Petersen / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 447, 207-231, 13 July 2016, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP447.1 --- A 3D regional crustal model of the NE Atlantic based on seismic and gravity data / C. Haase, J. Ebbing and T. Funck / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 447, 233-247, 12 October 2016, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP447.8 --- Focused studies --- Controls on the location of compressional deformation on the NW European margin / G. S. Kimbell, M. A. Stewart, S. Gradmann, P. M. Shannon, T. Funck, C. Haase, M. S. Stoker and J. R. Hopper / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 447, 249-278, 12 August 2016, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP447.3 --- Isostasy as a tool to validate interpretations of regional geophysical datasets – application to the mid-Norwegian continental margin / Sofie Gradmann, Claudia Haase and Jörg Ebbing / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 447, 279-297, 23 February 2017, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP447.13 --- The Jan Mayen microcontinent: an update of its architecture, structural development and role during the transition from the Ægir Ridge to the mid-oceanic Kolbeinsey Ridge / A. Blischke, C. Gaina, J. R. Hopper, G. Péron-Pinvidic, B. Brandsdóttir, P. Guarnieri, Ö. Erlendsson and K. Gunnarsson / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 447, 299-337, 8 September 2016, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP447.5 --- The stratigraphy and structure of the Faroese continental margin / Jana Ólavsdóttir, Óluva R. Eidesgaard and Martyn S. Stoker / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 447, 339-356, 22 July 2016, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP447.4 --- Review of velocity models in the Faroe–Shetland Channel / Uni K. Petersen and Thomas Funck / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 447, 357-374, 9 September 2016, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP447.7 --- Mesozoic and older rift basins on the SE Greenland Shelf offshore Ammassalik / Joanna Gerlings, John R. Hopper, Michael B. W. Fyhn and Nicolas Frandsen / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 447, 375-392, 13 April 2017, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP447.15 --- The oceanic domain and regional kinematics --- Break-up and seafloor spreading domains in the NE Atlantic / Carmen Gaina, Aziz Nasuti, Geoffrey S. Kimbell and Anett Blischke / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 447, 393-417, 3 February 2017, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP447.12 --- Seamounts and oceanic igneous features in the NE Atlantic: a link between plate motions and mantle dynamics / Carmen Gaina, Anett Blischke, Wolfram H. Geissler, Geoffrey S. Kimbell and Ögmundur Erlendsson / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 447, 419-442, 8 September 2016, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP447.6 --- The oil perspective --- Geology and seepage in the NE Atlantic region / Geert-Jan Vis / Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 447, 443-455, 7 April 2017, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP447.16
    Pages: Online-Ressource (VI, 467 Seiten) , Illustrationen, Diagramme, Karten
    ISBN: 9781786202789
    Language: English
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  • 2
    Call number: 9/M 07.0421(447)
    In: Geological Society special publication
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: 468 Seiten , Illustrationen
    ISBN: 978-1-78620-278-9
    Series Statement: Geological Society Special Publication 447
    Location: Reading room
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2014-08-03
    Description: The modern polar cryosphere reflects an extreme climate state with profound temperature gradients towards high-latitudes. It developed in association with stepwise Cenozoic cooling, beginning with ephemeral glaciations and the appearance of sea ice in the late middle Eocene. The polar ocean gateways played a pivotal role in changing the polar and global climate, along with declining greenhouse gas levels. The opening of the Drake Passage finalized the oceanographic isolation of Antarctica, some 40 Ma ago. The Arctic Ocean was an isolated basin until the early Miocene when rifting and subsequent sea-floor spreading started between Greenland and Svalbard, initiating the opening of the Fram Strait / Arctic-Atlantic Gateway (AAG). Although this gateway is known to be important in Earth’s past and modern climate, little is known about its Cenozoic development. However, the opening history and AAG’s consecutive widening and deepening must have had a strong impact on circulation and water mass exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic. To study the AAG’s complete history, ocean drilling at two primary sites and one alternate site located between 73°N and 78°N are proposed. These sites will provide unprecedented sedimentary records that will unveil (1) the history of shallow-water exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic, and (2) the development of the AAG to a deep-water connection and its influence on the global climate system. The specific overarching goals of our proposal are to study: • the influence of distinct tectonic events in the development of the AAG and the formation of deep water passage on the North Atlantic and Arctic paleoceanography, and • the role of the AAG in the climate transition from the Paleogene greenhouse to the Neogene icehouse for the long-term (~50 Ma) climate history of the northern North Atlantic.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2016-01-21
    Description: The modern polar cryosphere reflects an extreme climate state with profound temperature gradients towards high-latitudes. It developed in association with stepwise Cenozoic cooling, beginning with ephemeral glaciations and the appearance of sea ice in the late middle Eocene. The polar ocean gateways played a pivotal role in changing the polar and global climate, along with declining greenhouse gas levels. The opening of the Drake Passage finalized the oceanographic isolation of Antarctica, some 40 Ma ago. The Arctic Ocean was an isolated basin until the early Miocene when rifting and subsequent sea-floor spreading started between Greenland and Svalbard, initiating the opening of the Fram Strait / Arctic-Atlantic Gateway (AAG). Although this gateway is known to be important in Earth’s past and modern climate, little is known about its Cenozoic development. However, the opening history and AAG’s consecutive widening and deepening must have had a strong impact on circulation and water mass exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic. To study the AAG’s complete history, ocean drilling at two primary sites and one alternate site located between 73°N and 78°N in the Boreas Basin and along the East Greenland continental margin are proposed. These sites will provide unprecedented sedimentary records that will unveil (1) the history of shallow-water exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic, and (2) the development of the AAG to a deep-water connection and its influence on the global climate system. The specific overarching goals of our proposal are to study: (1) the influence of distinct tectonic events in the development of the AAG and the formation of deep water passage on the North Atlantic and Arctic paleoceanography, and (2) the role of the AAG in the climate transition from the Paleogene greenhouse to the Neogene icehouse for the long-term (~50 Ma) climate history of the northern North Atlantic. Getting a continuous record of the Cenozoic sedimentary succession that recorded the evolution of the Arctic-North Atlantic horizontal and vertical motions, and land and water connections will also help better understanding the post-breakup evolution of the NE Atlantic conjugate margins and associated sedimentary basins.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2016-01-21
    Description: The modern polar cryosphere reflects an extreme climate state with profound temperature gradients towards high-latitudes. It developed in association with stepwise Cenozoic cooling, beginning with ephemeral glaciations and the appearance of sea ice in the late middle Eocene. The polar ocean gateways played a pivotal role in changing the polar and global climate, along with declining greenhouse gas levels. The opening of the Drake Passage finalized the oceanographic isolation of Antarctica, some 40 Ma ago. The Arctic Ocean was an isolated basin until the early Miocene when rifting and subsequent sea-floor spreading started between Greenland and Svalbard, initiating the opening of the Fram Strait / Arctic-Atlantic Gateway (AAG). Although this gateway is known to be important in Earth’s past and modern climate, little is known about its Cenozoic development. However, the opening history and AAG’s consecutive widening and deepening must have had a strong impact on circulation and water mass exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic. To study the AAG’s complete history, ocean drilling at two primary sites and one alternate site located between 73°N and 78°N in the Boreas Basin and along the East Greenland continental margin are proposed. These sites will provide unprecedented sedimentary records that will unveil (1) the history of shallow-water exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic, and (2) the development of the AAG to a deep-water connection and its influence on the global climate system. The specific overarching goals of our proposal are to study: (1) the influence of distinct tectonic events in the development of the AAG and the formation of deep water passage on the North Atlantic and Arctic paleoceanography, and (2) the role of the AAG in the climate transition from the Paleogene greenhouse to the Neogene icehouse for the long-term (~50 Ma) climate history of the northern North Atlantic. Getting a continuous record of the Cenozoic sedimentary succession that recorded the evolution of the Arctic-North Atlantic horizontal and vertical motions, and land and water connections will also help better understanding the post-breakup evolution of the NE Atlantic conjugate margins and associated sedimentary basins.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2017-11-27
    Description: An overview of the distribution of volcanic facies units was compiled over the North Atlantic region. The new maps establish the pattern of volcanism associated with breakup and the initiation of seafloor spreading over the main part of the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP). The maps include new analysis of the Faroe–Shetlands region that allows for a consistent volcanic facies map to be constructed over the entire eastern margin of the North Atlantic for the first time. A key result is that the various conjugate margin segments show a number of asymmetric patterns that are interpreted to result in part from pre-existing crustal and lithospheric structures. The compilation further shows that while the lateral extent of volcanism extends equally far to the south of the Iceland hot spot as it does to the north, the volume of material emplaced to the south is nearly double of that to the north. This suggests that a possible southward deflection of the Iceland mantle plume is a long-lived phenomenon originating during or shortly after impact of the plume.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Inbook , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2017-02-16
    Description: The Early Eocene continental break-up between the NE Greenland and the mid- Norwegian–SW Barents Sea margins was associated with voluminous magmatism and led to the emplacement of massive volcanic complexes including wedges of seawards-dipping reflections (SDR). We study the distribution of these break-up-related volcanic rocks along the NE Greenland margin by revisiting existing seismic reflection data and comparing our observations to betterstudied segments of the conjugate margin. Seismic facies types match between the conjugate margins and show strong lateral variations. Seaward-dipping wedges are mapped offshore East Greenland, the conjugate to the Vøring continental margin. The geophysical signature of the SDRs becomes less visible towards the north, as it does along the conjugate Lofoten–Vestera°len margin. We suggest that the Traill Ø volcanic ridge is a result of plume–ridge interactions formed between approximately 54 and 47 Ma. North of the East Greenland Ridge, strong basement reflections conjugate to the Vestbakken Volcanic Province are interpreted as lava flows or ‘spurious’ SDRs. We discuss our findings in conjunction with results from seismic wide-angle experiments, gravity and magnetic data. We focus on the spatial and temporal relationships of the break-up volcanic rocks, and their structural setting in a late rift and initial oceanic drift stage.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Inbook , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2017-08-04
    Description: Prestack depth-migrated seismic reflection data collected off Flemish Cap on the Newfoundland margin show a structure of abruptly thinning continental crust that leads into an oceanic accretion system. Within continental crust, there is no clear evidence for detachment surfaces analogous to the S reflection off the conjugate Galicia Bank margin, demonstrating a first-order asymmetry in final rift development. Anomalously thin (3–4 km), magmatically produced oceanic crust abuts very thin continental crust and is highly tectonized. This indicates that initial accretion of the oceanic crust was in a magma-limited setting similar to present-day ultraslow spreading environments. Seaward, oceanic crust thins to 〈1.3 km and exhibits an unusual, highly reflective layering. We propose that a period of magma starvation led to exhumation of mantle in an oceanic core complex that was subsequently buried by deep-marine sheet flows to form this layering. Subsequent seafloor spreading formed normal, ∼6-km-thick oceanic crust. This interpretation implies large fluctuations in the available melt supply during the early stages of seafloor spreading before a more typical slow-spreading system was established.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2018-07-13
    Description: Seismic reflection and refraction data were acquired along the southeast margin of Flemish Cap at a position conjugate to drilling and geophysical surveys across the Galicia Bank margin. The data document first-order asymmetry during final break-up between Newfoundland and Iberia. An abrupt necking profile of continental crust observed off Flemish Cap contrasts strongly with gradual tapering on the conjugate margin. There is no evidence beneath Flemish Cap for a final phase of continental extension that resulted in thin continental crust underlain by a strong ‘S’-like reflection, which indicates that this mode of extension occurred only on the Galicia Bank margin. Compelling evidence for a broad zone of exhumed mantle or for peridotite ridges is also lacking along the Flemish Cap margin. Instead, anomalously thin, 3–4-km-thick oceanic crust is observed. This crust is highly tectonized and broken up by high-angle normal faulting. The thin crust and rift structures that resemble the abandoned spreading centre in the Labrador sea suggest that initial seafloor spreading was affected by processes observed in present-day ultra-slow spreading environments. Landwards, Flemish Cap is underlain by a highly reflective lower crust. The reflectivity most likely originates from older Palaeozoic orogenic structures that are unrelated to extension and break-up tectonics.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2016-12-11
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
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