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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-11-19
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 42132 data points
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  • 2
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    PANGAEA
    In:  National Oceanography Centre, Southampton
    Publication Date: 2018-11-19
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 57458 data points
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  • 3
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Macmillian Magazines Ltd.
    Nature 415 (2002), S. 1011-1014 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] Mixing of water masses from the deep ocean to the layers above can be estimated from considerations of continuity in the global ocean overturning circulation. But averaged over ocean basins, diffusivity has been observed to be too small to account for the global upward flux of water, and high ...
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-02-26
    Description: During the CINDY–DYNAMO field campaign of September 2011–January 2012, a Seaglider was deployed at 80°E and completed 10 north-south sections between 3 and 4°S, measuring temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen concentration, and chlorophyll fluorescence. These high-resolution subsurface observations provide insight into equatorial ocean Rossby wave activity forced by three Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) events during this time period. These Rossby waves generate variability in temperature O(1°C), salinity O(0.2 g kg−1), density O(0.2 kg m−3), and oxygen concentration O(10 μmol kg−1), associated with 10 m vertical displacements of the thermocline. The variability extends down to 1000 m, the greatest depth of the Seaglider observations, highlighting the importance of surface forcing for the deep equatorial ocean. The temperature variability observed by the Seaglider is greater than that simulated in the ECCO-JPL reanalysis, especially at depth. There is also marked variability in chlorophyll fluorescence at the surface and at the depth of the chlorophyll maximum. Upwelling from Rossby waves and local wind stress curl leads to an enhanced shoaling of the chlorophyll maximum by 10–25 m in response to the increased availability of nutrients and light. This influence of the MJO on primary production via equatorial ocean Rossby waves has not previously been recognized.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed , info:eu-repo/semantics/article
    Format: text
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2015-11-24
    Description: A surface diurnal warm layer is diagnosed from Seaglider observations, and develops on half the days in the CINDY/DYNAMO Indian Ocean experiment. The diurnal warm layer occurs on days of high solar radiation flux (〉 80 W m−2) and low wind speed (〈 6 m s−1), and preferentially in the inactive stage of the Madden–Julian Oscillation. Its diurnal harmonic has an exponential vertical structure with a depth scale of 4–5 m (dependent on chlorophyll concentration), consistent with forcing by absorption of solar radiation. The effective sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly due to the diurnal warm layer often reaches 0.8°C in the afternoon, with a daily mean of 0.2°C, rectifying the diurnal cycle onto longer time scales. This SST anomaly drives an anomalous flux of 4 W m−2 that cools the ocean. Alternatively, in a climate model where this process is unresolved, this represents an erroneous flux that warms the ocean. A simple model predicts a diurnal warm layer to occur on 30–50% of days across the tropical warm pool. On the remaining days, with low solar radiation and high wind speeds, a residual diurnal cycle is observed by the Seaglider, with a diurnal harmonic of temperature that decreases linearly with depth. As wind speed increases, this already weak temperature gradient decreases further, tending towards isothermal conditions.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
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  • 6
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    In:  [Paper] In: 2012 IEEE/OES Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV), 24.-27.09.2012, Southampton, UK . 2012 IEEE/OES Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV) ; pp. 1-7 .
    Publication Date: 2014-10-21
    Description: Over the last couple of decades, autonomous underwater vehicles have become a powerful tool in the investigation of biological, chemical and physical oceanography. Not only do they complement existing technologies, they open up new avenues of investigation through their specific capabilities. For AUVs to benefit from the same success other long term monitoring platforms have had (moorings, ARGO), it is critical to understand their limits in both monitoring and process studies. We present results from several Seaglider deployments by the University of East Anglia where Seagliders were pushed to the limit of their abilities. Comparison of missions in extreme conditions at the limits of their depth range (70 to 1000 m) and battery life shows a need for tailored survey design and flight parameters in order to maximise mission duration, control over the Seaglider and most efficient science sampling. In particular, we look at post-processing of Seaglider data and present aspects of a new MATLAB toolbox which greatly improves on timestamp correction of Seaglider data by accounting for errors introduced by using a single thread processor.
    Type: Conference or Workshop Item , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: text
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2019-01-26
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 372 data points
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  • 8
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    In:  Science, 346 (6214). pp. 1227-1231.
    Publication Date: 2016-09-09
    Description: Decadal trends in the properties of seawater adjacent to Antarctica are poorly known, and the mechanisms responsible for such changes are uncertain. Antarctic ice sheet mass loss is largely driven by ice shelf basal melt, which is influenced by ocean-ice interactions and has been correlated with Antarctic Continental Shelf Bottom Water (ASBW) temperature. We document the spatial distribution of long-term large-scale trends in temperature, salinity, and core depth over the Antarctic continental shelf and slope. Warming at the seabed in the Bellingshausen and Amundsen seas is linked to increased heat content and to a shoaling of the mid-depth temperature maximum over the continental slope, allowing warmer, saltier water greater access to the shelf in recent years. Regions of ASBW warming are those exhibiting increased ice shelf melt.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
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  • 9
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    IEEE
    In:  [Paper] In: Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV), 2012 IEEE/OES, 24.-27.09.2012, Southampton, UK . 2012 IEEE/OES Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV) ; pp. 1-7 .
    Publication Date: 2014-12-10
    Description: Over the last couple of decades, autonomous underwater vehicles have become a powerful tool in the investigation of biological, chemical and physical oceanography. Not only do they complement existing technologies, they open up new avenues of investigation through their specific capabilities. For AUVs to benefit from the same success other long term monitoring platforms have had (moorings, ARGO), it is critical to understand their limits in both monitoring and process studies. We present results from several Seaglider deployments by the University of East Anglia where Seagliders were pushed to the limit of their abilities. Comparison of missions in extreme conditions at the limits of their depth range (70 to 1000 m) and battery life shows a need for tailored survey design and flight parameters in order to maximise mission duration, control over the Seaglider and most efficient science sampling. In particular, we look at post-processing of Seaglider data and present aspects of a new MATLAB toolbox which greatly improves on timestamp correction of Seaglider data by accounting for errors introduced by using a single thread processor.
    Type: Conference or Workshop Item , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: text
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2018-11-19
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 250447 data points
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