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  • 1
    Call number: ZSP-686-177
    In: Report
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: 51 S. : graph. Darst. : 29,5 cm
    ISSN: 0937-1060
    Series Statement: Report / Max-Planck-Institut für Meteorologie 177
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
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  • 2
    Call number: MOP Per 892(3)
    In: Examensarbeit
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: 180 S. : graph. Darst.
    Series Statement: Examensarbeit / Max-Planck-Institut für Meteorologie 3
    Note: Hamburg, Univ., FB Geowiss., Diss., 1990
    Location: MOP - must be ordered
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
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  • 3
    Call number: SR 96.0498(248) ; ZSP-686-248
    In: Report
    Type of Medium: Series available for loan
    Pages: 37 S.
    ISSN: 0937-1060
    Series Statement: Report / Max-Planck-Institut für Meteorologie 248
    Language: English
    Location: Lower compact magazine
    Location: Lower compact magazine
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
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  • 4
    Call number: ZSP-686-197
    In: Report
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: 29 S. : graph. Darst. : 29 cm
    ISSN: 0937-1060
    Series Statement: Report / Max-Planck-Institut für Meteorologie 197
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
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  • 5
    Call number: ZSP-686-320
    In: Report
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: 42 S. : graph. Darst. + 1 Kt.
    ISSN: 0937-1060
    Series Statement: Report / Max-Planck-Institut für Meteorologie 320
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
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  • 6
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Dittert, Nicolas; Corrin, Lydie; Diepenbroek, Michael; Grobe, Hannes; Heinze, Christoph; Ragueneau, Olivier (2002): Management of (pale-)oceanographic data sets using the PANGAEA information system: the SINOPS example. Computers & Geosciences, 28(7), 789-798, https://doi.org/10.1016/S0098-3004(01)00112-1
    Publication Date: 2019-02-11
    Description: During the SINOPS project, an optimal state of the art simulation of the marine silicon cycle is attempted employing a biogeochemical ocean general circulation model (BOGCM) through three particular time steps relevant for global (paleo-) climate. In order to tune the model optimally, results of the simulations are compared to a comprehensive data set of 'real' observations. SINOPS' scientific data management ensures that data structure becomes homogeneous throughout the project. Practical work routine comprises systematic progress from data acquisition, through preparation, processing, quality check and archiving, up to the presentation of data to the scientific community. Meta-information and analytical data are mapped by an n-dimensional catalogue in order to itemize the analytical value and to serve as an unambiguous identifier. In practice, data management is carried out by means of the online-accessible information system PANGAEA, which offers a tool set comprising a data warehouse, Graphical Information System (GIS), 2-D plot, cross-section plot, etc. and whose multidimensional data model promotes scientific data mining. Besides scientific and technical aspects, this alliance between scientific project team and data management crew serves to integrate the participants and allows them to gain mutual respect and appreciation.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: unknown
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  • 7
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Ragueneau, Olivier; Tréguer, Paul; Leynaert, Aude; Anderson, Robert F; Brzezinski, Mark A; DeMaster, David J; Dugdale, Richard; Dymond, Jack R; Fischer, Gerhard; Francois, Roger; Heinze, Christoph; Maier-Reimer, Ernst; Martin-Jézéquel, Véronique; Nelson, David M; Quéguiner, Bernard (2000): A review of the Si cycle in the modern ocean: recent progress and missing gaps in the application of biogenic opal as a paleoproductivity proxy. Global and Planetary Change, 26(4), 317-365, https://doi.org/10.1016/S0921-8181(00)00052-7
    Publication Date: 2019-02-13
    Description: Due to the major role played by diatoms in the biological pump of CO2, and to the presence of silica-rich sediments in areas that play a major role in air-sea CO2 exchange (e.g. the Southern Ocean and the Equatorial Pacific), opal has a strong potential as a proxy for paleoproductivity reconstructions. However, because of spatial variations in the biogenic silica preservation, and in the degree of coupling between the marine Si and C biogeochemical cycles, paleoreconstructions are not straitghtforward. A better calibration of this proxy in the modern ocean is required, which needs a good understanding of the mechanisms that control the Si cycle, in close relation to the carbon cycle. This review of the Si cycle in the modern ocean starts with the mechanisms that control the uptake of silicic acid (Si(OH)4) by diatoms and the subsequent silicification processes, the regulatory mechanisms of which are uncoupled. This has strong implications for the direct measurement in the field of the kinetics of Si(OH)4 uptake and diatom growth. It also strongly influences the Si:C ratio within diatoms, clearly linked to environmental conditions. Diatoms tend to dominate new production at marine ergoclines. At depth, they also succeed to form mats, which sedimentation is at the origin of laminated sediments and marine sapropels. The concentration of Si(OH)4 with respect to other macronutrients exerts a major influence on diatom dominance and on the rain ratio between siliceous and calcareous material, which severely impacts surface waters pCO2. A compilation of biogenic fluxes collected at about 40 sites by means of sediment traps also shows a remarkable pattern of increasing BSi:Corg ratio along the path of the "conveyor belt", accompanying the relative enrichment of waters in Si compared to N and P. This observation suggests an extension of the Si pump model described by Dugdale and Wilkerson (1989, doi:10.1038/34630), giving to Si(OH)4 a major role in the control of the rain ratio, which is of major importance in the global carbon cycle. The fate of the BSi produced in surface waters is then described, in relation to Corg, in terms of both dissolution and preservation mechanisms. Difficulties in quantifying the dissolution of biogenic silica in the water column as well as the sinking rates and forms of BSi to the deep, provide evidence for a major gap in our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the competition between retention in and export from surface waters. The relative influences of environmental conditions, seasonality, food web structure or aggregation are however explored. Quantitatively, assuming steady state, the measurements of the opal rain rate by means of sediment traps matches reasonably well those obtained by adding the recycling and burial fluxes in the underlying abyssal sediments, for most of the sites where such a comparison is possible. The major exception is the Southern Ocean where sediment focusing precludes the closing of mass balances. Focusing in fact is also an important aspect of the downward revision of the importance of Southern Ocean sediments in the global biogenic silica accumulation. Qualitatively, little is known about the duration of the transfer through the deep and the quality of the material that reaches the seabed, which is suggested to represent a major gap in our understanding of the processes governing the early diagenesis of BSi in sediments. The sediment composition (special emphasis on Al availability), the sedimentation rate or bioturbation are shown to exert an important control on the competition between dissolution and preservation of BSi in sediments. It is suggested that a primary control on the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of BSi dissolution, both in coastal and abyssal sediments, is exerted by water column processes, either occuring in surface waters during the formation of the frustules, or linked to the transfer of the particles through the water column, which duration may influence the quality of the biogenic rain. This highlights the importance of studying the factors controlling the degree of coupling between pelagic and benthic processes in various regions of the world ocean, and its consequences, not only in terms of benthic biology but also for the constitution of the sediment archive. The last section, first calls for the end of the "NPZD" models, and for the introduction of processes linked to the Si cycle, into models describing the phytoplankton cycles in surface waters and the early diagenesis of BSi in sediments. It also calls for the creation of an integrated 1-D diagnostic model of the Si:C coupling, for a better understanding of the interactions between surface waters, deep waters and the upper sedimentary column. The importance of Si(OH)4 in the control of the rain ratio and the improved parametrization of the Si cycle in the 1-D diagnostic models should lead to a reasonable incorporation of the Si cycle into 3-D regional circulation models and OGCMs, with important implications for climate change studies and paleoreconstructions at regional and global scale.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/zip, 4 datasets
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2019-02-01
    Description: Idealised and hindcast simulations performed with the stand-alone ocean carbon-cycle configuration of the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM-OC) are described and evaluated. We present simulation results of two different model versions at different grid resolutions and using two different atmospheric forcing data sets. Model version NorESM-OC1 corresponds to the version that is included in the fully coupled model NorESM-ME1, which participated in CMIP5. The main update between NorESM-OC1 and NorESM-OC1.2 is the addition of two new options for the treatment of sinking particles. We find that using a constant sinking speed, which has been the standard in NorESM's ocean carbon cycle module HAMOCC (HAMburg Ocean Carbon Cycle model) does not transport enough particulate organic carbon (POC) into the deep ocean below approximately 2000 m depth. The two newly implemented parameterisations, a particle aggregation scheme with prognostic sinking speed, and a simpler scheme prescribing a linear increase of sinking speed with depth, provide better agreement with observed POC fluxes. Additionally, reduced deep ocean biases of oxygen and remineralised phosphate indicate a better performance of the new parameterisations. For model version 1.2, a re-tuning of the ecosystem parameterisation has been performed, which (i) reduces previously too high primary production in high latitudes, (ii) consequently improves model results for surface nutrients, and (iii) reduces alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon biases at low latitudes. We use hindcast simulations with prescribed observed and constant (pre-industrial) atmospheric CO2 concentrations to derive the past and contemporary ocean carbon sink. For the period 1990–1999 we find an average ocean carbon uptake ranging from 2.01 to 2.58 Pg C yr-1 depending on model version, grid resolution and atmospheric forcing data set.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
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  • 9
    ISSN: 0009-286X
    Keywords: Konvektionstrockner ; Förderlufttrockner ; Drallströmung ; Windsichten ; Chemistry ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Additional Material: 3 Ill.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2017-06-05
    Description: © The Author(s), 2013. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in Biogeosciences 10 (2013): 6225-6245, doi:10.5194/bg-10-6225-2013.
    Description: Ocean ecosystems are increasingly stressed by human-induced changes of their physical, chemical and biological environment. Among these changes, warming, acidification, deoxygenation and changes in primary productivity by marine phytoplankton can be considered as four of the major stressors of open ocean ecosystems. Due to rising atmospheric CO2 in the coming decades, these changes will be amplified. Here, we use the most recent simulations performed in the framework of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 to assess how these stressors may evolve over the course of the 21st century. The 10 Earth system models used here project similar trends in ocean warming, acidification, deoxygenation and reduced primary productivity for each of the IPCC's representative concentration pathways (RCPs) over the 21st century. For the "business-as-usual" scenario RCP8.5, the model-mean changes in the 2090s (compared to the 1990s) for sea surface temperature, sea surface pH, global O2 content and integrated primary productivity amount to +2.73 (±0.72) °C, −0.33 (±0.003) pH unit, −3.45 (±0.44)% and −8.6 (±7.9)%, respectively. For the high mitigation scenario RCP2.6, corresponding changes are +0.71 (±0.45) °C, −0.07 (±0.001) pH unit, −1.81 (±0.31)% and −2.0 (±4.1)%, respectively, illustrating the effectiveness of extreme mitigation strategies. Although these stressors operate globally, they display distinct regional patterns and thus do not change coincidentally. Large decreases in O2 and in pH are simulated in global ocean intermediate and mode waters, whereas large reductions in primary production are simulated in the tropics and in the North Atlantic. Although temperature and pH projections are robust across models, the same does not hold for projections of subsurface O2 concentrations in the tropics and global and regional changes in net primary productivity. These high uncertainties in projections of primary productivity and subsurface oxygen prompt us to continue inter-model comparisons to understand these model differences, while calling for caution when using the CMIP5 models to force regional impact models.
    Description: This work was supported by EU FP7 project CARBOCHANGE (under grant agreement No. 264879), EU FP7 project MEECE (under grant agreement No. 212085), EU FP7 project SOCCLI (under grant agreement No. 317699), and ANR project MACROES. S. C. Doney acknowledges the US National Science Foundation (AGS-1048827). This work has been supported by the Research Council of Norway through the EarthClim (207711/E10) and NOTUR/NorStore projects. M. Vichi acknowledges the support of the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research and the Ministry for Environment, Land and Sea through the project GEMINA.
    Repository Name: Woods Hole Open Access Server
    Type: Article
    Format: application/pdf
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