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  • 1
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Habib, Daniel (1983): Sedimentation-rate-dependent distribution of organic matter in the North Atlantic Jurassic-Cretaceous. In: Sheridan, RE; Gradstein, FM; et al. (eds.), Initial Reports of the Deep Sea Drilling Project (U.S. Govt. Printing Office), 76, 781-794, https://doi.org/10.2973/dsdp.proc.76.139.1983
    Publication Date: 2018-09-27
    Description: The kind, sedimentation rate, and diagenesis of organic particles delivered to the North Atlantic seafloor during the Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous were responsible for the presence of carbonaceous sediments in Hole 534A. Organic-rich black clays formed from the rapid supply of organic matter; this organic matter was composed of either abundant, well-preserved, and poorly sorted particles of land plants deposited in clays and silty clays within terrigenous turbiditic sequences (tracheal facies) or abundant amorphous debris (xenomorphic facies) generated through the digestive tracts of marine zooplankton and sedimented as fecal pellets. Evidence for the fecal-pellet origin of xenomorphic debris is illustrated. Black clays were also produced in sediments containing less organic matter as a result of the black color of carbonized particles composing all or most of the residues (micrinitic facies). Slowly sedimented hematitic Aptian clays contain very little carbonized, organic debris that survived diagenetic oxidation. In the red calcareous clay sequence of the Late Jurassic, larger amounts of this oxidized debris turned several clay layers black or blackish red. Carbonized debris also dominates the residues recovered in interbedded black and green Albian clays. Carbonization of organic matter in these sediments either turned them black or provided the diagenetic environment for reduced iron. Carbonized debris is also appreciable in burrow-mottled black-green Kimmeridgian clay. The study of Hole 534A organic matter indicates that during the middle Callovian there was a rapid supply of terrigenous organic matter, followed by a late Callovian episode of rapidly supplied xenomorphic debris deposited as fecal pellets. The Late Jurassic-Berriasian was a time of slower sedimentation of organic matter, primarily of a marine dinoflagellate flora in a poorly preserved xenomorphic facies variously affected by diagenetic oxidation. Several intervals of carbonized tracheal tissue in the Oxfordian and Kimmeridgian suggest episodes of oxidized terrigenous matter. The same sequence of Callovian organic events is evident in much of the Early Cretaceous
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 447 data points
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  • 2
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Hollister, Charles D; Ewing, John I; Habib, Daniel; Lancelot, Yves; Luterbacher, Hanspeter; Paulus, F J; Poag, C Wylie; Wilcoxon, James A; Worstell, Paula J (1972): Site 99: Cat Gap. In: Hollister, C.D.; Ewing, J.I.; et al., Initial Reports of the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Initial Reports of the Deep Sea Drilling Project, U.S. Government Printing Office, XI, 51-73, https://doi.org/10.2973/dsdp.proc.11.102.1972
    Publication Date: 2018-09-27
    Description: The principal objective at this site was the recovery of Mesozoic sediment and a sample of Horizon B (or basement). The location chosen for drilling is about 40 nautical miles southeast of San Salvador in 4914 meters of water. Aside from the possibility of recovering the oldest Atlantic sediment, drilling at this site was expected to produce interesting samples for comparison stratigraphically and lithologically with those of Holes 4 and 5 of Leg 1.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 34 data points
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  • 3
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Hollister, Charles D; Ewing, John I; Habib, Daniel; Hathaway, James; Lancelot, Yves; Luterbacher, Hanspeter; Paulus, F J; Poag, C Wylie; Wilcoxon, James A; Worstell, Paula J (1972): Site 105: Lower Continental Rise Hills. In: Hollister, C.D.; Ewing, J.I.; et al., Initial Reports of the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Initial Reports of the Deep Sea Drilling Project, U.S. Government Printing Office, XI, 219-312, https://doi.org/10.2973/dsdp.proc.11.106.1972
    Publication Date: 2018-09-27
    Description: In view of the fact that thick sections of Neocomian and Jurassic limestone were found in the region off the Bahama Islands (Holes 99A, 100 and 101) a hole was selected for drilling between New York and Bermuda at a position where knowledge might be gained about the structure and composition of the lower continental rise hills. In addition, such a hole would ascertain the age of the crust.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 8 data points
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-09-27
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 26 data points
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-09-27
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 42 data points
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  • 6
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Habib, Daniel; Drugg, Warren S (1987): Palynology of Sites 603 and 605, Leg 93, Deep Sea Drilling Project. In: van Hinte, JE; Wise, SW Jr; et al. (eds.), Initial Reports of the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Washington (U.S. Govt. Printing Office), 93, 751-775, https://doi.org/10.2973/dsdp.proc.93.122.1987
    Publication Date: 2018-09-27
    Description: The Palynology of two sections recovered during Leg 93 drilling by the Deep Sea Drilling Project in the continental rise along the western margin of the North Atlantic is reported. In Hole 603B at Site 603, the dinoflagellate stratigraphy indicates that the interval from Cores 603B-82 to 603B-26 ranges in age from late Berriasian to Santonian. The BlakeBahama Formation ranges from late Berriasian to Aptian. The Hatteras Formation ranges from Aptian to Cenomanian, although the uppermost part may be Turonian. Dinoflagellate evidence from the middle part of the Plantagenet Formation indicates an age from late Coniacian or early Santonian to Santonian within the interval of Cores 603B-28 to 603B-26. Magnetic polarity evidence of the stratigraphy of the Early Cretaceous for the western North Atlantic indicates a reliable correlation with the dinoflagellate zonation. The stratigraphic sequence of palynologically defined organic facies in carbonaceous claystone lithologies in Hole 603B shows that organic stratigraphic units consisting predominantly of fecal-pellet-derived, pelagic organic matter (xenomorphic facies) alternate with units consisting predominantly of terrigenous organic matter (tracheal and exinitic facies), corresponding to that described from other sites in the North Atlantic. A terrigenous organic facies is identified for the first time from the Plantagenet Formation. The claystone organic facies and major lithofacies are closely correlated. The tracheal and exinitic facies occur in carbonaceous terrigenous claystones and claystone turbidites associated with sandstone/siltstone terrigenous turbidites. The xenomorphic facies occurs in claystones within pelagic limestones lacking any turbidites, and in blackish, noncalcareous claystones which correlate in age with the marine-carbon-rich sapropels which are widespread in the North Atlantic Cenomanian. This facies also occurs with an admixture of terrigenous organic particles in the Blake-Bahama Formation, but the mixture is consistent with the submarine fan setting of this interval. The concentration of refractory organic matter (carbonized particles) in the micrinitic and carbonized tracheal facies is considered to be the result, at least in part, of the oxidation of sediment buried below a surface slowly accumulating pelagic clays below the carbonate compensation depth. The progressive increase in number of dinoflagellate species per stage through the Early Cretaceous (except for the late Barremian-Aptian) may have resulted indirectly from the generally progressive rise in global sea level during this time. At Site 605, the dinoflagellate stratigraphy across the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary is remarkably close to that published from the Maestrichtian and Danian of Denmark. The Maestrichtian/Danian boundary is placed precisely within Section 605-66-1 by dinoflagellate evidence, agreeing with that predicted by other microfossils. The new dinoflagellate-cyst-based genus, Pierceites and its new species P. schizocystis, and the new combination P. ( = Trithyrodinium) pentagonum (May) are proposed. Diacanthum hollisteri Habib, type species of Diacanthum, is emended to accommodat e cysts with the archeopyle formulas P3'', 2P2''-3'', 2P3''-4'', and 3P2''-3''-4''.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 224 data points
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2019-03-20
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 57 data points
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2018-09-28
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 4 data points
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  • 9
    ISSN: 1573-2932
    Keywords: biosolids ; compost ; effluent ; estuarine sediments ; fibers ; polarized light microscopy ; sewage ; sludge
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Energy, Environment Protection, Nuclear Power Engineering
    Notes: Abstract Because of concerns regarding health, safety, and aesthetics, a test that identifies the presence of sewage sludge or its products (biosolids) in commercial materials such as soil conditioners and composts would be useful. This test could also trace the effluent plume from a sewage treatment plant. We have discovered that synthetic fibers serve as such an indicator. Synthetic fibers are abundant in sludge, sludge products, and sewage treatment plant effluents. The fibers evidently are introduced from clothes-washing machines and survive the sewage treatment process. Synthetic fibers were identified using polarized light microscopy, which provided a simple, rapid method for determining the presence or absence of municipal sewage sludge or its products. False positives or false negatives have not occurred with any of the materials examined so far. We also monitored synthetic fibers in surface sediments of Huntington Harbor, Long Island, NY, a harbor receiving the effluent from a trickling filter sewage treatment plant. Fibers generally decrease in size and abundance with distance from the source. In Oyster Bay Harbor, Long Island, an advanced sewage treatment plant is operated with a final microfiltration step. Synthetic fibers are less abundant in the sediments of this harbor.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Habib, Daniel; Saeedi, Farnosh (2007): The Manumiella seelandica global spike: Cooling during regression at the close of the Maastrichtian. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 255(1-2), 87-97, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.palaeo.2007.02.043
    Publication Date: 2019-02-13
    Description: Manumiella seelandica (Lange 1969) Bujak and Davies 1983, emend. Firth 1987 occurs in great abundance, together with a closely related and possibly conspecific form, Isabelidinium? sp., virtually at the end of the Maastrichtian. The abundance of M. seelandica immediately adjacent the Cretaceous/Paleogene (KPg) boundary, and its global distribution, serve as an excellent biostratigraphic marker for dating it. The abundance spike is widely distributed in both Northern and Southern hemispheres, and ranges from locations as far south as Seymour Island, Antarctica to as far north asWest Greenland. The global distribution of the M. seelandica spike in such widely separated areas, and the ease with which it is recognized in closely sampled sections, underscores its value in dating. Until recently, this short-lived event was correlated within an interval of global sea level fall and regression which extended from the latest Maastrichtian into the earliest Danian; that is, that the species became numerically abundant as the shoreline approached. However, based on our study of the boundary interval at Bass River in southern New Jersey USA, we propose that an additional factor may have contributed to its origin. Our investigation of this section shows that there is a prominent abundance spike in the 20 cm (7.8 in.)-interval immediately beneath the boundary, and that this interval correlates precisely with the delta18O isotope evidence of cooling. At Bass River, the last 500 ky of the Maastrichtian was a period of global warmth, as revealed by geochemical evidence. However, based on the geochemical evidence, a mild cooling period began within tens of thousands of years of the close of the Cretaceous Period. Based on this correlation, we present the hypothesis that the cooling event played an important role in producing this global assemblage of dinoflagellates. Study of a large number of fossils in the sample situated 15 cm (5.85 in.) beneath the boundary shows that there is considerable variation in overall form and archeopyle excystment in Manumiella seelandica. The same degree of variation was not observed in the samples with fewer specimens.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/zip, 2 datasets
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