ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Collection
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2019
    Description: 〈p〉Although guest-filled carbon nanotube yarns provide record performance as torsional and tensile artificial muscles, they are expensive, and only part of the muscle effectively contributes to actuation. We describe a muscle type that provides higher performance, in which the guest that drives actuation is a sheath on a twisted or coiled core that can be an inexpensive yarn. This change from guest-filled to sheath-run artificial muscles increases the maximum work capacity by factors of 1.70 to 2.15 for tensile muscles driven electrothermally or by vapor absorption. A sheath-run electrochemical muscle generates 1.98 watts per gram of average contractile power—40 times that for human muscle and 9.0 times that of the highest power alternative electrochemical muscle. Theory predicts the observed performance advantages of sheath-run muscles.〈/p〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 1999-06-05
    Description: The chemical dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules have been studied by measuring the quantum state-resolved scattering probabilities of nitric oxide (NO) molecules on clean and oxygen-covered copper (111) surfaces, where the incident NO was prepared in single quantum states with vibrational energies of as much as 300 kilojoules per mole. The dependence of vibrationally elastic and inelastic scattering on oxygen coverage strongly suggests that highly excited NO (v = 13 and 15) reacts on clean copper (111) with a probability of 0.87 +/- 0.05, more than three orders of magnitude greater than the reaction probability of ground-state NO. Vibrational promotion of surface chemistry on metals (up to near-unit reaction probability) is possible despite the expected efficient relaxation of vibrational energy at metal surfaces.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hou -- Huang -- Gulding -- Rettner -- Auerbach -- Wodtke -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1999 Jun 4;284(5420):1647-50.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉IBM Research Division, Almaden Research Center, San Jose, CA 95120, USA. Department of Chemistry, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10356389" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2003-08-16
    Description: Plants attacked by pathogens rapidly deposit callose, a beta-1,3-glucan, at wound sites. Traditionally, this deposition is thought to reinforce the cell wall and is regarded as a defense response. Surprisingly, here we found that powdery mildew resistant 4 (pmr4), a mutant lacking pathogen-induced callose, became resistant to pathogens, rather than more susceptible. This resistance was due to mutation of a callose synthase, resulting in a loss of the induced callose response. Double-mutant analysis indicated that blocking the salicylic acid (SA) defense signaling pathway was sufficient to restore susceptibility to pmr4 mutants. Thus, callose or callose synthase negatively regulates the SA pathway.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Nishimura, Marc T -- Stein, Monica -- Hou, Bi-Huei -- Vogel, John P -- Edwards, Herb -- Somerville, Shauna C -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2003 Aug 15;301(5635):969-72.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12920300" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alleles ; Arabidopsis/cytology/genetics/*metabolism/*microbiology ; Ascomycota/*physiology ; Cell Death ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant ; Genes, Plant ; Glucans/metabolism ; Glucosyltransferases/*genetics/metabolism ; *Membrane Proteins ; Mutation ; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis ; Phenotype ; *Plant Diseases ; Plant Leaves/metabolism ; Salicylic Acid/*metabolism ; *Schizosaccharomyces pombe Proteins ; Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2010-11-26
    Description: Sugar efflux transporters are essential for the maintenance of animal blood glucose levels, plant nectar production, and plant seed and pollen development. Despite broad biological importance, the identity of sugar efflux transporters has remained elusive. Using optical glucose sensors, we identified a new class of sugar transporters, named SWEETs, and show that at least six out of seventeen Arabidopsis, two out of over twenty rice and two out of seven homologues in Caenorhabditis elegans, and the single copy human protein, mediate glucose transport. Arabidopsis SWEET8 is essential for pollen viability, and the rice homologues SWEET11 and SWEET14 are specifically exploited by bacterial pathogens for virulence by means of direct binding of a bacterial effector to the SWEET promoter. Bacterial symbionts and fungal and bacterial pathogens induce the expression of different SWEET genes, indicating that the sugar efflux function of SWEET transporters is probably targeted by pathogens and symbionts for nutritional gain. The metazoan homologues may be involved in sugar efflux from intestinal, liver, epididymis and mammary cells.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3000469/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3000469/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Chen, Li-Qing -- Hou, Bi-Huei -- Lalonde, Sylvie -- Takanaga, Hitomi -- Hartung, Mara L -- Qu, Xiao-Qing -- Guo, Woei-Jiun -- Kim, Jung-Gun -- Underwood, William -- Chaudhuri, Bhavna -- Chermak, Diane -- Antony, Ginny -- White, Frank F -- Somerville, Shauna C -- Mudgett, Mary Beth -- Frommer, Wolf B -- 1R01DK079109/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- F32GM083439-02/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK079109/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK079109-01/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK079109-02/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK079109-03/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK079109-03S1/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK079109-04/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM068886/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- ZR01GM06886-06A1/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2010 Nov 25;468(7323):527-32. doi: 10.1038/nature09606.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution for Science, 260 Panama St, Stanford, California 94305, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21107422" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Arabidopsis/genetics/*metabolism/microbiology ; Arabidopsis Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Biological Transport/genetics ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant ; Glucose/*metabolism ; HEK293 Cells ; Host-Pathogen Interactions/*physiology ; Humans ; Membrane Transport Proteins/*metabolism ; Models, Biological ; Oryza/genetics/metabolism/microbiology ; RNA, Messenger/metabolism ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genetics ; Xenopus/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2014-03-29
    Description: Angiosperms developed floral nectaries that reward pollinating insects. Although nectar function and composition have been characterized, the mechanism of nectar secretion has remained unclear. Here we identify SWEET9 as a nectary-specific sugar transporter in three eudicot species: Arabidopsis thaliana, Brassica rapa (extrastaminal nectaries) and Nicotiana attenuata (gynoecial nectaries). We show that SWEET9 is essential for nectar production and can function as an efflux transporter. We also show that sucrose phosphate synthase genes, encoding key enzymes for sucrose biosynthesis, are highly expressed in nectaries and that their expression is also essential for nectar secretion. Together these data are consistent with a model in which sucrose is synthesized in the nectary parenchyma and subsequently secreted into the extracellular space via SWEET9, where sucrose is hydrolysed by an apoplasmic invertase to produce a mixture of sucrose, glucose and fructose. The recruitment of SWEET9 for sucrose export may have been a key innovation, and could have coincided with the evolution of core eudicots and contributed to the evolution of nectar secretion to reward pollinators.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lin, I Winnie -- Sosso, Davide -- Chen, Li-Qing -- Gase, Klaus -- Kim, Sang-Gyu -- Kessler, Danny -- Klinkenberg, Peter M -- Gorder, Molly K -- Hou, Bi-Huei -- Qu, Xiao-Qing -- Carter, Clay J -- Baldwin, Ian T -- Frommer, Wolf B -- England -- Nature. 2014 Apr 24;508(7497):546-9. doi: 10.1038/nature13082. Epub 2014 Mar 16.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA [2] Carnegie Institution for Science, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, California 94305, USA. ; Carnegie Institution for Science, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, California 94305, USA. ; Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Jena D-07745, Germany. ; 1] Department of Biology, University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth, Minnesota 55812, USA [2] Department of Plant Biology, University of Minnesota, St Paul, Minnesota 55108, USA. ; 1] Carnegie Institution for Science, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, California 94305, USA [2] Key Laboratory of Plant and Soil Interactions, College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, 100193 Beijing, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24670640" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alkyl and Aryl Transferases/metabolism ; Animals ; Arabidopsis/cytology/enzymology/genetics/*metabolism ; Arabidopsis Proteins/metabolism ; Brassica rapa/anatomy & histology/enzymology/metabolism ; Carbohydrate Metabolism ; Extracellular Space/metabolism ; Flowers/physiology ; Glucosyltransferases/genetics/*metabolism ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Membrane Transport Proteins/metabolism ; Oocytes ; Plant Nectar/biosynthesis/*secretion ; Plant Proteins/*metabolism ; Pollination ; Protein Transport ; Sequence Homology ; Starch/metabolism ; Sucrose/*metabolism ; Tobacco/anatomy & histology/enzymology/metabolism ; Xenopus ; beta-Fructofuranosidase/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2016-12-21
    Description: Recent Atacama Large Millimetre/submillimetre Array (ALMA) observations of high-redshift normal galaxies have been providing a great opportunity to clarify the general origin of dust in the Universe, not biased to very bright special objects even at z 〉 6. To clarify what constraint we can get for the dust enrichment in normal galaxies detected by ALMA, we use a theoretical model that includes major processes driving dust evolution in a galaxy; that is, dust condensation in stellar ejecta, dust growth by the accretion of gas-phase metals and supernova destruction. Using the dust emission fluxes detected in two normal galaxies at z 〉 6 by ALMA as a constraint, we can get the range of the time-scales (or efficiencies) of the above mentioned processes. We find that if we assume extremely high-condensation efficiency in stellar ejecta ( f in 0.5), rapid dust enrichment by stellar sources in the early phase may be enough to explain the observed ALMA flux, unless dust destruction by supernovae in those galaxies is stronger than that in nearby galaxies. If we assume a condensation efficiency expected from theoretical calculations ( f in 0.1), strong dust growth (even stronger than assumed for nearby galaxies if they are metal-poor galaxies) is required. These results indicate that the normal galaxies detected by ALMA at z 〉 6 are biased to objects (i) with high dust condensation efficiency in stellar ejecta, (ii) with strong dust growth in very dense molecular clouds or (iii) with efficient dust growth because of fast metal enrichment up to solar metallicity. A measurement of metallicity is crucial to distinguish among these possibilities.
    Print ISSN: 0035-8711
    Electronic ISSN: 1365-2966
    Topics: Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2016-03-09
    Description: Archaeal communities and the factors regulating their diversity in high altitude lakes are poorly understood. Here, we provide the first high-throughput sequencing study of Archaea from Tibetan Plateau lake sediments. We analyzed twenty lake sediments from the world's highest and largest plateau and found diverse archaeal assemblages that clustered into groups dominated by methanogenic Euryarchaeota, Crenarchaeota and Halobacteria/mixed euryarchaeal phylotypes. Statistical analysis inferred that salinity was the major driver of community composition, and that archaeal diversity increased with salinity. Sediments with the highest salinities were mostly dominated by Halobacteria. Crenarchaeota dominated at intermediate salinities, and methanogens were present in all lake sediments, albeit most abundant at low salinities. The distribution patterns of the three functional types of methanogens (hydrogenotrophic, acetotrophic and methylotrophic) were also related to changes in salinity. Our results show that salinity is a key factor controlling archaeal community diversity and composition in lake sediments on a spatial scale that spans nearly 2000 km on the Tibetan Plateau.
    Print ISSN: 0168-6496
    Electronic ISSN: 1574-6941
    Topics: Biology
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2016-07-26
    Description: The frequency content of strong ground motions from subduction slab earthquakes differs significantly from that of ground motions produced by other categories (tectonic locations: shallow crustal, upper mantle, and subduction interface) of earthquakes in subduction zones. In the last two decades, a large number of records from subduction slab events have been obtained in Japan. We present a ground-motion prediction equation (GMPE) for this category of earthquakes. We used a large dataset from reliably identified slab events up to the end of 2012. The GMPEs were based on a set of simple geometric attenuation functions, site classes were used as site terms, and nonlinear site amplification ratios were adopted. A bilinear magnitude-scaling function was adopted for large earthquakes with moment magnitude M w ≥7.1, with the scaling rates for large events being much smaller than for the smaller events. A magnitude-squared term was used for events with M w 〈7.1 as well as the bilinear magnitude-scaling function. We also modeled the effect of volcanic zones using an anelastic attenuation coefficient applied to a horizontal portion of the seismic-wave travel distance within possible volcanic zones. We found that excluding the records from sites with inferred site classes improved the model goodness of fit. The within-event residuals were approximately separated into within-site and between-site residuals, and the corresponding standard deviations were calculated using a random effects model. The separation of within-event residuals into within-site and between-site components allows for the possibility of adopting different standard deviations for different site classes in a probabilistic seismic-hazard analysis if desired. Online Material: Figures showing the distribution of between-event residuals with respect to magnitude and fault-top depth and the distribution of within-event residuals with respect to magnitude and source distance.
    Print ISSN: 0037-1106
    Electronic ISSN: 1943-3573
    Topics: Geosciences , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2016-07-09
    Description: : Accurate prediction of binding free energy is of particular importance to computational biology and structure-based drug design. Among those methods for binding affinity predictions, the end-point approaches, such as MM/PBSA and LIE, have been widely used because they can achieve a good balance between prediction accuracy and computational cost. Here we present an easy-to-use pipeline tool named Ca lculation of F ree E nergy (CaFE) to conduct MM/PBSA and LIE calculations. Powered by the VMD and NAMD programs, CaFE is able to handle numerous static coordinate and molecular dynamics trajectory file formats generated by different molecular simulation packages and supports various force field parameters. Availability and implementation: CaFE source code and documentation are freely available under the GNU General Public License via GitHub at https://github.com/huiliucode/cafe_plugin . It is a VMD plugin written in Tcl and the usage is platform-independent. Contact: tingjunhou@zju.edu.cn
    Print ISSN: 1367-4803
    Electronic ISSN: 1460-2059
    Topics: Biology , Computer Science , Medicine
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2013-05-17
    Description: Superfluidity is a macroscopic quantum phenomenon occurring in systems as diverse as liquid helium and neutron stars. It occurs below a critical temperature and leads to peculiar behaviour such as frictionless flow, the formation of quantized vortices and quenching of the moment of inertia. Ultracold atomic gases offer control of interactions and external confinement, providing unique opportunities to explore superfluid phenomena. Many such (finite-temperature) phenomena can be explained in terms of a two-fluid mixture comprising a normal component, which behaves like an ordinary fluid, and a superfluid component with zero viscosity and zero entropy. The two-component nature of a superfluid is manifest in 'second sound', an entropy wave in which the superfluid and the non-superfluid components oscillate with opposite phases (as opposed to ordinary 'first sound', where they oscillate in phase). Here we report the observation of second sound in an ultracold Fermi gas with resonant interactions. The speed of second sound depends explicitly on the value of the superfluid fraction, a quantity that is sensitive to the spectrum of elementary excitations. Our measurements allow us to extract the temperature dependence of the superfluid fraction, a previously inaccessible quantity that will provide a benchmark for theories of strongly interacting quantum gases.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Sidorenkov, Leonid A -- Tey, Meng Khoon -- Grimm, Rudolf -- Hou, Yan-Hua -- Pitaevskii, Lev -- Stringari, Sandro -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jun 6;498(7452):78-81. doi: 10.1038/nature12136. Epub 2013 May 15.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institut fur Quantenoptik und Quanteninformation, Osterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23676679" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...