ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2019-04-30
    Type: Conference or Workshop Item , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2015-07-08
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2019-04-02
    Description: oraminifera are commonly used in paleoclimate reconstructions as they occur throughout the world's oceans and are often abundantly preserved in the sediments. Traditionally, foraminifera‐based proxies like δ18O and Mg/Ca are analyzed on pooled specimens of a single species. Analysis of single specimens of foraminifera allows reconstructing climate variability on timescales related to El Niño‐Southern Oscillation (ENSO) or seasonality. However, quantitative calibrations between the statistics of individual foraminiferal analyses (IFA) and climate variability are still missing. We performed Mg/Ca and δ18O measurements on single specimens from core‐top sediments from different settings to better understand the signal recorded by individual foraminifera. We used three species of planktic foraminifera (G. ruber (s.s.), T. sacculifer, and N. dutertrei) from the Indo‐Pacific Warm Pool (IPWP) and one species (G. ruber (pink)) from the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). Mean values for the different species of Mg/Ca vs calculated δ18O temperatures agree with published calibration equations. IFA statistics (both mean and standard deviation) of Mg/Ca and δ18O between the different sites show a strong relationship indicating that both proxies are influenced by a common factor, most likely temperature variations during calcification. This strongly supports the use of IFA to reconstruct climate variability. However, our combined IFA data for the different species only show a weak relationship to seasonal and interannual temperature changes, especially when seasonal variability increases at a location. This suggests that the season and depth habitat of the foraminifera strongly affect IFA variability, such that ecology needs to be considered when reconstructing past climate variability.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed , info:eu-repo/semantics/article
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2016-12-18
    Description: The shoaling and final closure of the Central American Seaway (CAS) resulted in a major change of the global ocean circulation and has been suggested as an essential driver for strengthening of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). The exact timing of CAS closure is key to interpreting its importance. Here we present a reconstruction of deep and intermediate water Nd and Pb isotope compositions obtained from fossil fish teeth and the authigenic coatings of planktonic foraminifera in the eastern equatorial Pacific (Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1241) and the Caribbean (ODP Sites 998, 999, and 1000) covering the final stages of CAS closure between 5.6 and 2.2 Ma. The data for the Pacific site indicate no significant Atlantic/Caribbean influence over this entire period. The Caribbean sites show a continuous trend to less radiogenic Nd isotope compositions during the Pliocene, consistent with an enhancement of Upper North Atlantic Deep Water (UNADW) inflow and a strengthening of the AMOC. Superimposed onto this long-term trend, shorter-term changes of intermediate Caribbean Nd isotope signatures approached more UNADW-like values during intervals when published reconstructions of seawater salinity suggested complete closure of the CAS. The data imply that significant deep water exchange with the Pacific essentially stopped by 7 Ma and that shallow exchange, which still occurred at least periodically until approximately 2.5 Ma, may have been linked to the strength of the AMOC but did not have any direct effect on the intermediate and deep Caribbean Nd isotope signatures through mixing with Pacific waters.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2017-06-19
    Description: Tectonically induced changes in oceanic seaways had profound effects on global and regional climate during the Late Neogene. The constriction of the Central American Seaway reached a critical threshold during the early Pliocene ~4.8–4 million years (Ma) ago. Model simulations indicate the strengthening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) with a signature warming response in the Northern Hemisphere and cooling in the Southern Hemisphere. Subsequently, between ~4–3 Ma, the constriction of the Indonesian Seaway impacted regional climate and might have accelerated the Northern Hemisphere Glaciation. We here present Pliocene Atlantic interhemispheric sea surface temperature and salinity gradients (deduced from foraminiferal Mg/Ca and stable oxygen isotopes, δ18O) in combination with a recently published benthic stable carbon isotope (δ13C) record from the southernmost extent of North Atlantic Deep Water to reconstruct gateway-related changes in the AMOC mode. After an early reduction of the AMOC at ~5.3 Ma, we show in agreement with model simulations of the impacts of Central American Seaway closure a strengthened AMOC with a global climate signature. During ~3.8–3 Ma, we suggest a weakening of the AMOC in line with the global cooling trend, with possible contributions from the constriction of the Indonesian Seaway.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2017-06-18
    Description: In order to investigate a possible connection between tropical northeast (NE) Atlantic primary productivity, Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), and drought in the Sahel region during Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1), we used dinoflagellate cyst (dinocyst) assemblages, Mg/Ca based reconstructed temperatures, stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) and geochemical parameters of a marine sediment core (GeoB 9508-5) from the continental slope offshore Senegal. Our results show a two-phase productivity pattern within HS1 that progressed from an interval of low marine productivity between ~ 19 and 16 kyr BP to a phase with an abrupt and large productivity increase from ~ 16 to 15 kyr BP. The second phase is characterized by distinct heavy planktonic δ13C values and high concentrations of heterotrophic dinocysts in addition to a significant cooling signal based on the reconstructions of past sea surface temperatures (SSTs). We conclude that productivity variations within HS1 can be attributed to a substantial shift of West African atmospheric processes. Taken together our results indicate a significant intensification of the North East (NE) trade winds over West Africa leading to more intense upwelling during the last millennium of HS1 between ~ 16 and 15 kyr BP, thus leaving a strong imprint on the dinocyst assemblages and sea surface conditions. Therefore, the two-phase productivity pattern indicates a complex hydrographic setting suggesting that HS1 cannot be regarded as uniform as previously thought.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2018-03-13
    Description: The ocean plays a major role in the global carbon cycle, and attempts to reconstruct past changes in the marine carbonate system are increasing. The speciation of dissolved uranium is sensitive to variations in carbonate system parameters, and previous studies have shown that this is recorded in the uranium-to-calcium ratio (U/Ca) of the calcite shells of planktonic foraminifera. Here we test whether U/Ca ratios of deep-sea benthic foraminifera are equally suited as an indicator of the carbonate system. We compare U/Ca in two common benthic foraminifer species (Planulina wuellerstorfi and Cibicidoides mundulus) from South Atlantic core top samples with the calcite saturation state (Δ[CO32−] = [CO32−]in situ − [CO32−]sat) of the ambient seawater and find significant negative correlations for both species. Compared with planktonic foraminifera, the sensitivity of U/Ca in benthic foraminifera to changes in Δ[CO32−] is about 1 order of magnitude higher. Although Δ[CO32−] exerts the dominant control on the average foraminiferal U/Ca, the intertest and intratest variability indicates the presence of additional factors forcing U/Ca.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2018-06-21
    Type: Report , NonPeerReviewed , info:eu-repo/semantics/book
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2015-01-09
    Description: The final phase of the closure of the Panamanian Gateway and the intensification of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (NHG) both occurred during the Late Pliocene. Glacial–interglacial (G–IG) variations in sea level might, therefore, have had a significant impact on the remaining connections between the East Pacific and the Caribbean. Here, we present combined foraminiferal Mg/Ca and δ 18O measurements from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1241 from the East Pacific and ODP Site 999 from the Caribbean. The studied time interval covers the first three major G–IG Marine Isotope Stages (MIS 95–100, ∼2.5 Ma∼2.5 Ma) after the intensification of NHG. Analyses were performed on the planktonic foraminifera Neogloboquadrina dutertrei and Globigerinoides sacculifer, representing water mass properties in the thermocline and the mixed-layer, respectively. Changes in sea water temperature, relative salinity, and water column stratification strongly suggest that the Panamanian Gateway temporarily closed during glacial MIS 98 and 100, as a result of changes in ice volume equivalent to a drop in sea level of 60–90 m. Reconstructed sea surface temperatures (SST) from G. sacculifer show a glacial decrease of 2.5 °C at Site 1241, but increases of up to 3 °C at Site 999 during glacial MIS 98 and 100 suggesting that the Panamanian Gateway closed during these glacial periods. The Mg/Ca-temperatures of N. dutertrei remain relatively stable in the East Pacific, but do show a 3 °C warming in the Caribbean at the onset of these glacial periods suggesting that the closing of the gateway also changed the water column stratification. We infer that the glacial closure of the gateway allowed the Western Atlantic Warm Pool to extend into the southern Caribbean, increasing SST (G. sacculifer) and deepening the thermocline (N. dutertrei). Additionally, ice volume appears to have become large enough during MIS 100 to survive the relatively short lasting interglacial MIS 99 so that the gateway remained closed. Towards the end of MIS 98, during MIS 97 and into MIS 96 temperatures on both sides are mostly similar suggesting water masses exchanged again. Additionally, Caribbean variations in SST and δ18Owater follow a precession-like cyclicity rather than the obliquity-controlled variations characteristic of the East Pacific and many other tropical areas, suggesting that regional atmospheric processes related to the trade winds and the InterTropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) had a dominant impact in the Caribbean.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2018-03-07
    Description: We constructed a high-resolution Mg/Ca record on the planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides sacculifer in order to explore the change in sea surface temperature (SST) due to the shoaling of the Isthmus of Panama as well as the impact of secondary factors like diagenesis and large salinity fluctuations. The study covers the latest Miocene and the early Pliocene (5.6–3.9 Ma) and was combined with δ18O to isolate changes in sea surface salinity (SSS). Before 4.5 Ma, SSTMg/Ca and SSS show moderate fluctuations, indicating a free exchange of surface ocean water masses between the Pacific and the Atlantic. The increase in δ18O after 4.5 Ma represents increasing salinities in the Caribbean due to the progressive closure of the Panamanian Gateway. The increase in Mg/Ca toward values of maximum 7 mmol/mol suggests that secondary influences have played a significant role. Evidence of crystalline overgrowths on the foraminiferal tests in correlation with aragonite, Sr/Ca, and productivity cyclicities indicates a diagenetic overprint on the foraminiferal tests. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry analyses, however, do not show significantly increased Mg/Ca ratios in the crystalline overgrowths, and neither do calculations based on pore water data conclusively result in significantly elevated Mg/Ca ratios in the crystalline overgrowths. Alternatively, the elevated Mg/Ca ratios might have been caused by salinity as the δ18O record of Site 1000 has been interpreted to represent large fluctuations in SSS, and cultivating experiments have shown an increase in Mg/Ca with increasing salinity. We conclude that the Mg/Ca record 〈4.5 Ma can only reliably be considered for paleoceanographical purposes when the minimum values, not showing any evidence of secondary influences, are used, resulting in a warming of central Caribbean surface water masses after 4.5 Ma of ∼2°C.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...