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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2013-08-31
    Description: The isolated counterrotating high speed turboprop noise prediction program was compared with model data taken in the GE Aircraft Engines Cell 41 anechoic facility, the Boeing Transonic Wind Tunnel, and in NASA-Lewis' 8x6 and 9x15 wind tunnels. The predictions show good agreement with measured data under both low and high speed simulated flight conditions. The installation effect model developed for single rotation, high speed turboprops was extended to include counterotation. The additional effect of mounting a pylon upstream of the forward rotor was included in the flow field modeling. A nontraditional mechanism concerning the acoustic radiation from a propeller at angle of attach was investigated. Predictions made using this approach show results that are in much closer agreement with measurement over a range of operating conditions than those obtained via traditional fluctuating force methods. The isolated rotors and installation effects models were combines into a single prediction program, results of which were compared with data taken during the flight test of the B727/UDF engine demonstrator aircraft. Satisfactory comparisons between prediction and measured data for the demonstrator airplane, together with the identification of a nontraditional radiation mechanism for propellers at angle of attack are achieved.
    Keywords: ACOUSTICS
    Type: NAS 1.26:185241 , NASA-CR-185241
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2013-08-31
    Description: The isolated counterrotating high speed turboprop noise prediction program developed and funded by GE Aircraft Engines was compared with model data taken in the GE Aircraft Engines Cell 41 anechoic facility, the Boeing Transonic Wind Tunnel, and in the NASA-Lewis 8 x 6 and 9 x 15 wind tunnels. The predictions show good agreement with measured data under both low and high speed simulated flight conditions. The installation effect model developed for single rotation, high speed turboprops was extended to include counter rotation. The additional effect of mounting a pylon upstream of the forward rotor was included in the flow field modeling. A nontraditional mechanism concerning the acoustic radiation from a propeller at angle of attack was investigated. Predictions made using this approach show results that are in much closer agreement with measurement over a range of operating conditions than those obtained via traditional fluctuating force methods. The isolated rotors and installation effects models were combined into a single prediction program. The results were compared with data taken during the flight test of the B727/UDF (trademark) engine demonstrator aircraft.
    Keywords: ACOUSTICS
    Type: NASA-CR-185242 , NAS 1.26:185242
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2013-08-31
    Description: A tip vortex interaction model originally developed for compressors has been extended and adapted for use with counterrotating open rotors. Comparison of available acoustic data with predictions (made with and without the tip vortex model included) illustrate the importance of this interaction effect. This report documents the analytical modeling, a limited experimental verification, and certain key parametric studies pertaining to the tip vortex as a noise source mechanism for the unsteady loading noise of counterrotating properllers.
    Keywords: ACOUSTICS
    Type: NASA-CR-185135 , NAS 1.26:185135
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2013-08-31
    Description: A frequency-domain noncompact-source theory for the steady loading and volume-displacement (thickness) noise of high speed propellers has been developed and programmed. Both near field and far field effects have been considered. The code utilizes blade surface pressure distributions obtained from three-dimensional nonlinear aerodynamic flow field analysis programs as input for evaluating the steady loading noise. Simplified mathematical models of the velocity fields induced at the propeller disk by nearby wing and fuselage surfaces and by angle-of-attack operation have been developed to provide estimates of the unsteady loading imposed on the propeller by these potential field type interactions. These unsteady blade loadings have been coupled to a chordwise compact propeller unsteady loading noise model to provide predictions of unsteady loading noise caused by these installation effects. Finally, an analysis to estimate the corrections to be applied to the free-field noise predictions in order to arrive at the measurable fuselage sound pressure levels has been formulated and programmed. This analysis considers the effects of fuselage surface reflection and diffraction together with surface boundary layer refraction. The steady loading and thickness model and the unsteady loading model have been verified using NASA-supplied data for the SR-2 and SR-3 model propfans. In addition, the steady loading and thickness model has been compared with data from the SR-6 model propfan. These theoretical models have been employed in the evaluation of the SR-7 powered Gulfstream aircraft in terms of noise characteristics at representative takeoff, cruise, and approach operating conditions. In all cases, agreement between theory and experiment is encouraging.
    Keywords: ACOUSTICS
    Type: NASA-CR-182257-VOL-1 , NAS 1.26:182257-VOL-1
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2013-08-31
    Description: Certain empirical rotor wake and turbulence relationships were developed using existing low speed rotor wave data. A tip vortex model was developed by replacing the annulus wall with a row of image vortices. An axisymmetric turbulence spectrum model, developed in the context of rotor inflow turbulence, was adapted to predicting the turbulence spectrum of the stator gust upwash.
    Keywords: AERODYNAMICS
    Type: NASA-CR-174849 , NAS 1.26:174849
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2013-08-31
    Description: Complete tabulations of 1/3-octave band acoustic measurements are given.
    Keywords: ACOUSTICS
    Type: NASA-CR-174665 , NAS 1.26:174665 , GE-84SRD006-VOL-2 , DS-3-VOL-2
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2013-08-31
    Description: The noise characteristics of a high-speed fan were studied. The experimental investigation was carried out on a 50.8 cm (20 in.) diameter scale model fan stage in an anechoic chamber with an inflow turbulence control screen installed. The forty-four blade rotor was tested with forty-eight vane and eighty-six vane stator rows, over a range of aixal rotor-stator spacings from 0.5 to 2.3 rotor tip chords. A two-dimensional strip theory model of rotor-stator interaction noise was employed to predict the measured tone power level trends, and good overall agreement with measured trends was obtained.
    Keywords: ACOUSTICS
    Type: GE-84SRD006-VOL-1 , NASA-CR-174664 , NAS 1.26:174664
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2013-08-31
    Description: The influence of tunnel turbulence on turbofan rotor noise was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the NASA Ames 40 by 80 foot tunnel in simulating flight levels of fan noise. A previously developed theory for predicting rotor/turbulence interaction noise was refined and extended to include first-order effects of inlet turbulence anisotropy. This theory was then verified by carrying out extensive data/theory comparisons. The resulting model computer program was then employed to carry out a parametric study of the effects of fan size, blade number, and operating line on rotor/turbulence noise for outdoor test stand. NASA Ames wind tunnel, and flight inlet turbulence conditions. A major result of this study is that although wind tunnel rotor/turbulence noise levels are not as low as flight levels they are substantially lower than the outdoor test stand levels and do not mask other sources of fan noise.
    Keywords: ACOUSTICS
    Type: NASA-CR-152359
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2016-06-07
    Description: The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.
    Keywords: ACOUSTICS
    Type: NASA. Langley Research Center, Aeroacoustics of Flight Vehicles: Theory and Practice. Volume 2: Noise Control; p 207-269
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: The 'drooped' inlet used on most wing mounted engines produces a wall static pressure distortion at the fan face of about plus or minus 2%. The interaction of the fan rotor with this fixed distortion pattern produces blade passing frequency and harmonic tone levels in flight which contribute to forward radiated engine noise spectra. Data from a wind tunnel test, using both a drooped inlet and an inlet with no droop, show large changes in forward radiated noise levels over a limited fan speed range. An analytical model of this fan noise mechanism is developed and is used to account for the major features of the measured results.
    Keywords: ACOUSTICS
    Type: AIAA PAPER 80-1050 , Aeroacoustics Conference; June 4-6, 1980; Hartford, CT
    Format: text
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