ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Call number: 9783319700694 (e-book)
    In: Ecological studies, volume 232
    Description / Table of Contents: Harmful algal blooms (HABs) - blooms that cause fish kills, contaminate seafood with toxins, or cause human or ecological health impacts and harm to local economies - are occurring more often, in more places and lasting longer than in past decades. This expansion is primarily the result of human activities, through increased nutrient inputs and various aspects of climate change. The Global Ecology and Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms (GEOHAB) programme promoted international collaboration to understand HAB population dynamics in various oceanographic regimes and to improve the prediction of HABs. This volume introduces readers to the overarching framework of the GEOHAB programme, factors contributing to the global expansion of harmful algal blooms, the complexities of HABs in different habitats, and the forward-looking issues to be tackled by the next generation of GEOHAB, GlobalHAB. The programme brought together an international team of contributing scientists and ecosystem managers, and its outcomes will greatly benefit the international research community.
    Type of Medium: 12
    Pages: 1 Online-Ressource (xvi, 461 Seiten) , Illustrationen, Diagramme, Karten
    ISBN: 9783319700694 , 978-3-319-70069-4
    ISSN: 0070-8356 , 2196-971X
    Series Statement: Ecological studies volume 232
    Language: English
    Note: Contents Part I Introduction to Harmful Algal Blooms and the GEOHAB Programme 1 Introduction to the Global Ecology and Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms (GEOHAB) Synthesis / Patricia M. Glibert, Elisa Berdalet, Michele A. Burford, Grant C. Pitcher, and Mingjiang Zhou 2 Harmful Algal Blooms and the Importance of Understanding Their Ecology and Oceanography / Patricia M. Glibert, Elisa Berdalet, Michele A. Burford, Grant C. Pitcher, and Mingjiang Zhou 3 Establishment, Goals, and Legacy of the Global Ecology and Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms (GEOHAB) Programme / Raphael M. Kudela, Robin Raine, Grant C. Pitcher, Patrick Gentien, Elisa Berdalet, Henrik Enevoldsen, and Ed Urban Part II Global Changes and Harmful Algal Blooms 4 Changing Land-, Sea-, and Airscapes: Sources of Nutrient Pollution Affecting Habitat Suitability for Harmful Algae / Patricia M. Glibert, Arthur H.W. Beusen, John A. Harrison, Hans H. Dürr, Alexander F. Bouwman, and Goulven G. Laruelle 5 Harmful Algal Blooms in a Changing Ocean / Mark L. Wells and Bengt Karlson Part III Adaptive Strategies and Harmful Algal Blooms 6 Nutrients and Harmful Algal Blooms: Dynamic Kinetics and Flexible Nutrition / Patricia M. Glibert, Cynthia A. Heil, Frances P. Wilkerson, and Richard C. Dugdale 7 Mixotrophy in Harmful Algal Blooms: By Whom, on Whom, When, Why, and What Next / Kevin J. Flynn, Aditee Mitra, Patricia M. Glibert, and JoAnn M. Burkholder 8 The Role of Life Cycle Characteristics in Harmful Algal Bloom Dynamics / Rhodora V. Azanza, Michael L. Brosnahan, Donald M. Anderson, Inga Hense, and Marina Montresor Part IV Harmful Algal Blooms in Specific Habitats and Biomes 9 Key Questions and Recent Research Advances on Harmful Algal Blooms in Stratified Systems / Robin Raine, Elisa Berdalet, Hidekatsu Yamazaki, Ian Jenkinson, and Beatriz Reguera 10 Key Questions and Recent Research Advances on Harmful Algal Blooms in Fjords and Coastal Embayments / Suzanne Roy, Marina Montresor, and Allan Cembella 11 Key Questions and Recent Research Advances on Harmful Algal Blooms in Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems / Grant C. Pitcher, Francisco G. Figueiras, Raphael M. Kudela, Teresa Moita, Beatriz Reguera, and Manuel Ruiz-Villareal 12 Key Questions and Recent Research Advances on Harmful Algal Blooms in Relation to Nutrients and Eutrophication / Patricia M. Glibert, Adnan Al-Azri, J. Icarus Allen, Alexander F. Bouwman, Arthur H.W. Beusen, Michele A. Burford, Paul J. Harrison, and Mingjiang Zhou 13 Key Questions and Recent Research Advances on Harmful Algal Blooms in Benthic Systems / Elisa Berdalet and Patricia A. Tester Part V Spotlight on Harmful Algal Blooms in Asia 14 Overview of Harmful Algal Blooms in Asia / Ken Furuya, Mitsunori Iwataki, Po Teen Lim, Songhui Lu, Chui-Pin Leaw, Rhodora V. Azanza, Hak-Gyoon Kim, and Yasuwo Fukuyo 15 Harmful Algal Blooms in the Coastal Waters of China / Ren-Cheng Yu, Song-Hui Lü, and Yu-Bo Liang 16 Green Tides of the Yellow Sea: Massive Free-Floating Blooms of Ulva prolifera / Dongyan Liu and Mingjiang Zhou 17 Ecological Drivers of Green Noctiluca Blooms in Two Monsoonal-Driven Ecosystems / Joaquim I. Goes, Helga do R. Gomes, Khalid Al-Hashimi, and Anukul Buranapratheprat Part VI Observing and Predicting Harmful Algal Blooms: Tools and Predictive Approaches 18 Advancements and Continuing Challenges of Emerging Technologies and Tools for Detecting Harmful Algal Blooms, Their Antecedent Conditions and Toxins, and Applications in Predictive Models / Patricia M. Glibert, Grant C. Pitcher, Stewart Bernard, and Ming Li 19 Recent Advances in Modelling of Harmful Algal Blooms / Peter J.S. Franks Part VII Moving Forward: Emerging Issues and a New Global Programme 20 Emerging HAB Research Issues in Freshwater Environments / Michele A. Burford, David P. Hamilton, and Susanna A. Wood 21 Mitigation and Control of Harmful Algal Blooms / Zhiming Yu, Xiuxian Song, Xihua Cao, and Yang Liu 22 GlobalHAB: Fostering International Coordination on Harmful Algal Bloom Research in Aquatic Systems / Elisa Berdalet, Raphael M. Kudela, Neil S. Banas, Eileen Bresnan, Michele A. Burford, Keith Davidson, Christopher J. Gobler, Bengt Karlson, Po Teen Lim, Lincoln Mackenzie, Marina Montresor, Vera L. Trainer, Gires Usup, Kedong Yin, Henrik Enevoldsen, and Ed Urban Index
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Call number: 9783319302591 (e-book)
    Description / Table of Contents: This book highlights perspectives, insights, and data in the coupled fields of aquatic microbial ecology and biogeochemistry when viewed through the lens of collaborative duos - dual career couples. Their synergy and collaborative interactions have contributed substantially to our contemporary understanding of pattern, process and dynamics. This is thus a book by dual career couples about dual scientific processes. The papers herein represent wide-ranging topics, from the processes that structure microbial diversity to nitrogen and photosynthesis metabolism, to dynamics of changing ecosystems and processes and dynamics in individual ecosystems. In all, these papers take us from the Arctic to Africa, from the Arabian Sea to Australia, from small lakes in Maine and Yellowstone hot vents to the Sargasso Sea, and in the process provide analyses that make us think about the structure and function of all of these systems in the aquatic realm. This book is useful not only for the depth and breadth of knowledge conveyed in its chapters, but serves to guide dual career couples faced with the great challenges only they face. Great teams do make great science
    Type of Medium: 12
    Pages: 1 Online-Ressource (xvii, 300 Seiten) , Diagremma, Karten
    ISBN: 9783319302591 , 978-3-319-30259-1
    Language: English
    Note: Contents Part I Unraveling Microbial Diversity and Their Processes Phagotrophic Protists: Central Roles in Microbial Food Webs / Evelyn B. Sherr and Barry F. Sherr Overview Protists as Elemental Recyclers Protists as Consumers of Bacteria Protists as Consumers of Phytoplankton Protists in High Latitude Food Webs Looking to the Future References Drivers That Structure Biodiversity in the Plankton / Tatiana A. Rynearson and Susanne Menden-Deuer Plankton Biodiversity Alternate Hypotheses That Explain the Paradox of the Plankton An Organismal Perspective on the Paradox of the Plankton: A Biodiversity Explosion from Within? Linking Individual Level Behaviors with Plankton Ecology Pervasive Intra-specific Variability in the Genetic Diversity, Physiological Capacity, and Behavioral Repertoire of Plankton Evolution: Generating and Structuring Diversity over the Long Term Opportunities for Progress References The Elongated, the Squat and the Spherical: Selective Pressures for Phytoplankton Shape / Lee Karp-Boss and Emmanuel Boss Introduction Effects of Shape on Diffusion Other Selective Pressures References Crossing the Freshwater/Saline Barrier: A Phylogenetic Analysis of Bacteria Inhabiting Both Freshwater and Marine Ecosystems / Mina Bižić-Ionescu and Danny Ionescu Introduction Recent Data on Shared Taxa Synthesis of Published Sequence Data Future Perspectives References Approaches and Challenges for Linking Marine Biogeochemical Models with the “Omics” Revolution / Victoria J. Coles and Raleigh R. Hood Introduction Bridging the Cultural and Structural Divide Relating Existing Omics to Current Biogeochemical Models Near-Term Innovation Conclusions References Part II Viewing Growth and Trophodynamics Through a Stoichiometric Lens Out of Africa and into Stoichiometry / Susan S. Kilham and Peter Kilham References Exploring the Implications of the Stoichiometric Modulation of Planktonic Predation / Aditee Mitra and Kevin J. Flynn Introduction Characterising the Predator–Prey Stoichiometric Link Elemental Stoichiometry and Commercial Microalgal Production Effects of Temperature, Ocean Acidification and Nutrient Excess Avoiding Predation Stoichiometry and Mixotrophy Conclusions References . Part III Understanding the Mysteries of Light and Nitrogen On Saturating Response Curves from the Dual Perspectives of Photosynthesis and Nitrogen Metabolism / Todd M. Kana and Patricia M. Glibert Introduction Static vs. Dynamic Behavior Gradient Signals and Dynamics of Response Curves Overall Perspective on Dynamic Kinetics References Nitrate Reductase: A Nexus of Disciplines, Organisms, and Metabolism / Erica B. Young and John A. Berges Introduction Why Nitrate Reductase? Understanding That Has Emerged from Recent NR Measurements Recent Advances and Emerging Challenges Conclusion References The Ammonium Paradox of an Urban High- Nutrient Low-Growth Estuary / Frances Wilkerson and Richard Dugdale High-Nutrient Low-Growth Estuaries and Oligotrophication Observation of an Ammonium Paradox Ammonium: The Gatekeeper Controlling Access to Nitrate References Why Is Planktonic Nitrogen Fixation So Rare in Coastal Marine Ecosystems? Insights from a Cross-Systems Approach / Roxanne Marino and Robert W. Howarth References Where Light and Nutrients Collide: The Global Distribution and Activity of Subsurface Chlorophyll Maximum Layers / Greg M. Silsbe and Sairah Y. Malkin At the Confluence of Light and Nutrients Distribution of Marine SCMLs Phytoplankton Production in SCMLs Subsurface Chlorophyll Maximum Layers in Lakes References Part IV Looking in the Rear View Mirror: The Long View on Changing Ecosystems An Ecosystem in Transition: The Emergence of Mixotrophy in the Arabian Sea / Joaquim I. Goes and Helga do R. Gomes Introduction Materials and Methods Results and Discussion References The Saint Lawrence Island Polynya: A 25-Year Evaluation of an Analogue for Climate Change in Polar Regions / Jacqueline M. Grebmeier and Lee W. Cooper Introduction Synthesis Results and Discussion The Northern Bering Sea: Interannual Variability and Change Benthivores Overall Summary References Ecological Processes and Nutrient Transfers from Land to Sea: A 25-Year Perspective on Research and Management of the Seine River System / Josette Garnier and Gilles Billen Introduction 1850–1990: Organic Pollution and Oxygen 1990–2000: Eutrophication and Algal Bloom 2000–2015: Agricultural Pollution and Nitrate Contamination Conclusion: From Microbial Ecology to Territorial Biogeochemistry References A Historical Perspective on Eutrophication in the Pensacola Bay Estuary, FL, USA / Jane M. Caffrey and Michael C. Murrell Introduction Pensacola Bay Physical Setting Human Colonization of Pensacola Bay River and Estuarine Water Quality Controls on Primary Production, Organic Matter, and Nutrient Cycling Summary References Unpublished Reports Websites Meeting in the Middle: On the Interactions Between Microalgae and Their Predators or Zooplankton and Their Food / Karen H. Wiltshire and Maarten Boersma Introduction Materials and Methods Results Discussion References Lake Transparency: A Window into Decadal Variations in Dissolved Organic Carbon Concentrations in Lakes of Acadia National Park, Maine / Collin Roesler and Charles Culbertson Introduction Methods Results Discussion References Part V Focusing on Unique Systems, Processes and Dynamics Phytoplankton Biodiversity in the Oligotrophic Northwestern Sargasso Sea / James L. Pinckney and Tammi L. Richardson Introduction Materials and Methods Results Discussion References Biological Oceanography of the Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia: A Review / Peter C. Rothlisberg and Michele A. Burford Introduction Study Area Currents and Hydrography Phytoplankton and the Role of Nutrients Zooplankton Penaeid Prawn Larval Ecology Larval Dispersal Mechanisms Summary Points References Discerning the Causes of Toxic Cyanobacteria (Lyngbya majuscula) Blooms in Moreton Bay, Australia / Judith M. O’Neil and William C. Dennison Introduction Nutrient Interactions Light Interactions Conceptual Model Broader Significance References Copepod, Ctenophore, and Schyphomedusae Control in Structuring the Chesapeake Bay Summer Mesohaline Planktonic Food Web / Kevin G. Sellner and Stella G. Sellner Introduction Methods Results and Discussion References Microbiogeochemical Ecophysiology of Freshwater Hydrothermal Vents in Mary Bay Canyon, Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park WY / Carmen Aguilar and Russell Cuhel Introduction Methods Big Picture Outcomes Closing Remarks References Index
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    ISSN: 1365-2486
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology , Energy, Environment Protection, Nuclear Power Engineering , Geography
    Notes: The importance of temperature in regulating physiological processes is without question; however, the interpretation of the relationship between temperature and ecological data is much more complicated. Consequently, it is difficult to decide how the nature of the temperature response terms should be included in models used to predict responses of microbial processes to increasing regional temperature. This analysis compiles several years of data from a research programme conducted in Chesapeake Bay, in an effort to examine how individual microbial processes − as well as the balance between autotrophy and heterotrophy − have responded to temperature, and to predict changes in microbial trophic state based on realistic increases in global temperature. The upper boundary on all of the pelagic microbial rate processes that were measured could be described remarkably well as a linear function of temperature, although there was substantial scatter in the data. Pelagic microbial rate processes (e.g. phytoplankton production, respiration, bacterial productivity) showed a remarkably constrained range of Q10 values from 1.7 to 3.4. The one notable exception to this was nitrogen uptake in the North and Mid Bay, which exhibited Q10 values 〈 1.0. Proxies for phytoplankton biomass (e.g. chlorophyll) were largely independent of temperature while bacterial abundance was significantly related to temperature and was found to have a Q10 of 1.88.    Using these individual temperature responses, the balance of autotrophy and heterotrophy was assessed by calculating the community photosynthesis to respiration (P:R), NH4+ uptake to regeneration (U:R) and phytoplankton to bacterial productivity (PP:BP) ratios for current conditions (all ratios) and for a 2 and 5 °C temperature increase (NH4+ U:R excluded). The NH4+ U:R ratio stayed remarkable constant at ∼1 over the entire temperature range supporting the importance of regenerative processes to nitrogen availability even during periods of heavy allochthonous inputs. These elevated temperature calculations for P:R and PP:BP suggest that the magnitude of autotrophic production during the spring bloom may decrease with increased regional temperature and, as a consequence, the Chesapeake Bay might become net heterotrophic on an annual timescale. These calculations should be considered with caution, but nonetheless demonstrate that the impact of increasing temperature on the balance of autotrophic and heterotrophic processes needs to be researched further.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Hydrobiologia 363 (1997), S. 1-12 
    ISSN: 1573-5117
    Keywords: top-down control ; bottom-upcontrol ; NH4 +regeneration ; nutrientlimitation ; trophodynamics
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract Although our understanding of the complexity of theplankton and microbial food webs has increasedsubstantially over the past decade or two, there hasbeen little appreciation to date of the interactionsbetween top-down (grazing) control and bottom-up(nutrient supply) control on the structure andnutrient cycling processes within these webs. Thequality of nutrient supply, both in terms of therelative proportion of inorganic: organic nitrogen,as well as the relative proportion of inorganicnitrogen substrates has a direct impact on rates ofnitrogen uptake, and ultimately on the relativecomposition of phytoplankton and bacteria. At thesame time, grazing by microzooplankton andmacrozooplankton also influences both thecomposition of the food web and the rate of supplyof nitrogen. The impact of macrozooplankton onrates of nitrogen cycling in a microbial communityis complex: macrozooplankton release NH4 +,urea, and amino acids by direct excretion and by’sloppy feeding‘, but they also control both therates of nitrogen regeneration and uptake within thecommunity by grazing the microzooplankton, theprimary regenerators of NH4 +, and thephytoplankton, the primary consumers of nitrogen. Thus, grazing and nitrogen recycling are intricatelyconnected: the presence of large zoooplanktonsimultaneously provides top-down control of biomassand bottom-up nutrient supply. These relationshipsvary depending on the scale of interest, and haveimportant consequences for how we measure and modeltotal nitrogen cycling in a natural food web.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2011-07-01
    Print ISSN: 0254-4059
    Electronic ISSN: 1993-5005
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Published by Springer
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2011-07-01
    Print ISSN: 0254-4059
    Electronic ISSN: 1993-5005
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Published by Springer
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2006-02-01
    Print ISSN: 0168-2563
    Electronic ISSN: 1573-515X
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences
    Published by Springer
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2017-06-15
    Print ISSN: 0168-2563
    Electronic ISSN: 1573-515X
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences
    Published by Springer
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...