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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-06-11
    Description: Raman lidar water vapor and aerosol extinction profiles acquired during the daytime over the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in northern Oklahoma (36.606 N, 97.50 W, 315 m) are evaluated using profiles measured by in situ and remote sensing instruments deployed during the May 2003 Aerosol Intensive Operations Period (IOP). The automated algorithms used to derive these profiles from the Raman lidar data were first modified to reduce the adverse effects associated with a general loss of sensitivity of the Raman lidar since early 2002. The Raman lidar water vapor measurements, which are calibrated to match precipitable water vapor (PWV) derived from coincident microwave radiometer (MWR) measurements were, on average, 5-10% (0.3-0.6 g/m(exp 3) higher than the other measurements. Some of this difference is due to out-of-date line parameters that were subsequently updated in the MWR PWV retrievals. The Raman lidar aerosol extinction measurements were, on average, about 0.03 km(exp -1) higher than aerosol measurements derived from airborne Sun photometer measurements of aerosol optical thickness and in situ measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption. This bias, which was about 50% of the mean aerosol extinction measured during this IOP, decreased to about 10% when aerosol extinction comparisons were restricted to aerosol extinction values larger than 0.15 km(exp -1). The lidar measurements of the aerosol extinction/backscatter ratio and airborne Sun photometer measurements of the aerosol optical thickness were used along with in situ measurements of the aerosol size distribution to retrieve estimates of the aerosol single scattering albedo (omega(sub o)) and the effective complex refractive index. Retrieved values of omega(sub o) ranged from (0.91-0.98) and were in generally good agreement with omega(sub o) derived from airborne in situ measurements of scattering and absorption. Elevated aerosol layers located between about 2.6 and 3.6 km were observed by the Raman lidar on May 25 and May 27. The airborne measurements and lidar retrievals indicated that these layers, which were likely smoke produced by Siberian forest fires, were primarily composed of relatively large particles (r(sub eff) approximately 0.23 micrometers), and that the layers were relatively nonabsorbing (omega(sub o) approximately 0.96-0.98). Preliminary results show that major modifications that were made to the Raman lidar system during 2004 have dramatically improved the sensitivity in the aerosol and water vapor channels and reduced random errors in the aerosol scattering ratio and water vapor retrievals by an order of magnitude.
    Keywords: Meteorology and Climatology
    Type: Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres; Volume 111; 1-21
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2018-06-11
    Description: On 31 December 2001, ice-crystal fallstreaks (e.g., cirrus uncinus, or colloquially "Mare's Tails") from supercooled liquid water parent clouds were observed by ground-based lidars pointed vertically from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (SGP) facility near Lamont, Oklahoma. The incidence of liquid phase cloud with apparent ice-phase precipitation is investigated. Scenarios for mixed-phase particle nucleation, and fallstreak formation and sustenance are discussed. The observations are unique in the context of the historical reverence given to the commonly observed c h s uncinus fallstreak (wholly ice) versus this seemingly contradictory coincidence of liquid water begetting ice-crystal streaks.
    Keywords: Meteorology and Climatology
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2013-08-31
    Description: A simple and fast atmospheric correction algorithm is described which is used to correct radiances of scattered sunlight measured by aircraft and/or satellite above a uniform surface. The atmospheric effect, the basic equations, a description of the computational procedure, and a sensitivity study are discussed. The program is designed to take the measured radiances, view and illumination directions, and the aerosol and gaseous absorption optical thickness to compute the radiance just above the surface, the irradiance on the surface, and surface reflectance. Alternatively, the program will compute the upward radiance at a specific altitude for a given surface reflectance, view and illumination directions, and aerosol and gaseous absorption optical thickness. The algorithm can be applied for any view and illumination directions and any wavelength in the range 0.48 micron to 2.2 micron. The relation between the measured radiance and surface reflectance, which is expressed as a function of atmospheric properties and measurement geometry, is computed using a radiative transfer routine. The results of the computations are presented in a table which forms the basis of the correction algorithm. The algorithm can be used for atmospheric corrections in the presence of a rural aerosol. The sensitivity of the derived surface reflectance to uncertainties in the model and input data is discussed.
    Keywords: COMPUTER PROGRAMMING AND SOFTWARE
    Type: NASA-TM-100751 , REPT-90B00032 , NAS 1.15:100751
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2004-12-03
    Description: The TARFOX (Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment) intensive field campaign was designed to reduce uncertainties in estimates of the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on climate by measuring direct radiative effects and the optical, physical, and chemical properties of aerosols [1]. TARFOX was conducted off the East Coast of the United States between July 10-31, 1996. Ground, aircraft, and satellite-based sensors measured the sensitivity of radiative fields at various atmospheric levels to aerosol optical properties (i.e., optical thickness, phase function, single-scattering albedo) and to the vertical profile of aerosols. The LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument, which was flown on the NASA ER-2 aircraft, measured vertical profiles of total scattering ratio and water vapor during a series of 9 flights. These profiles were used in real-time to help direct the other aircraft to the appropriate altitudes for intensive sampling of aerosol layers. We have subsequently used the LASE aerosol data to derive aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles. Using these aerosol extinction profiles, we derived estimates of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and compared these with measurements of AOT from both ground and airborne sun photometers and derived from the ATSR-2 (Along Track and Scanning Radiometer 2) sensor on ERS-2 (European Remote Sensing Satellite-2). We also used the water vapor mixing ratio profiles measured simultaneously by LASE to derive precipitable water vapor and compare these to ground based measurements.
    Keywords: Geophysics
    Type: Nineteenth International Laser Radar Conference; 11-14; NASA/CP-1998-207671/PT1
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2004-12-03
    Description: Water vapor in the atmosphere plays an important role in radiative transfer and the process of radiative balance so critical for understanding global change. It is the principal ingredient in cloud formation, one of the most difficult atmospheric processes to model, and the most variable component of the Earth-atmosphere albedo. And as a free molecule, it is the most active infrared absorber and emitter, thus, the most important greenhouse gas. The radiative impact of water vapor is important at all levels of the atmosphere. Even though moisture decreases by several orders-of-magnitude from the Earth's surface to the tropopause, recent research has shown that, from a radiative standpoint, a small percentage change in water vapor at any level is nearly equivalent. Therefore accurate and precise measurements of this important atmospheric constituent are needed at all levels to evaluate the full radiative impact. The need for improved measurements in the upper troposphere is particularly important because of the generally hostile (very dry and cold) conditions encountered. Because of the importance of water vapor to the understanding of radiative transfer, the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program initiated a series of measurement campaigns at the Cloud And Radiation Testbed (CART) site in Oklahoma, especially focused on atmospheric water vapor. Three water vapor intensive observation period (water vapor IOP) campaigns were planned. Two of the water vapor IOP campaigns have been completed: the first IOP was held during the fall of 1996 with a focus on boundary layer water vapor measurements, and the second was conducted during the fall of 1997 with a focus on both boundary layer moisture e and moisture in the upper troposphere. This paper presents a review of the intercomparisons of water vapor measurements in the upper troposphere aquired during the second water vapor IOP. Data to be presented include water vapor measurements ements from: two Raman Lidars, the NASA Goddard Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) and the CART Raman Lidar (CARL), a number of Vaisala radiosondes launched during the IOP campaign, and a dew point hygrometer flown on the University of North Dakota Cessna Citation Aircraft.
    Keywords: Instrumentation and Photography
    Type: Nineteenth International Laser Radar Conference; 367-370; NASA/CP-1998-207671/PT1
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2004-12-03
    Description: The Southern Great Plains 1997 (SGP97) field experiment was conducted in Oklahoma during June-July 1997 to validate the models used for computing remote soil moisture using measurements by microwave radiometers. One of the objectives of SGP97 was to examine the effect of soil moisture on the evolution of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) and clouds over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) during the warm season. The LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) airborne DIAL (Differential Absorption Lidar) system, which was flown autonomously on the NASA ER-2 aircraft during previous missions, was reconfigured to fly on the NASA P3 research aircraft. During SGP97 LASE was used to study the morning evolution of the ABL, particularly as manifested in the development of the convective boundary layer, and to study the influence of soil moisture variations on the development of ABL. The ABL development is strongly influenced by the surface energy budget, which is in turn influenced by soil moisture, mesoscale meteorology, clouds, and solar insolation. LASE data acquired during this mission are being used to study the ABL water vapor budget, the development of the ABL, spatial and temporal variabilities in the ABL, and the meteorological factors that influence the ABL development. This field experiment also permitted comparisons of LASE water vapor measurements with water vapor profiles acquired by radiosondes launched at the DOE (Department of Energy) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plain (SGP) site and at NASA/Wallops Flight Facility, as well as with measurements from other SGP97 aircraft.
    Keywords: Earth Resources and Remote Sensing
    Type: Nineteenth International Laser Radar Conference; 261-264; NASA/CP-1998-207671/PT1
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2004-12-03
    Description: Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) is the first fully engineered, autonomous airborne DIAL (Differentials Absorption Lidar) system to measure water vapor, aerosols, and clouds throughout the troposphere. This system uses a double-pulsed Ti:sapphire laser, which is pumped by a frequency-doubled flashlamp-pumped Nd: YAG laser, to transmit light in the 815 mn absorption band of water vapor. LASE operates by locking to a strong water vapor line and electronically tuning to any spectral position on the absorption line to choose the suitable absorption cross-section for optimum measurements over a range of concentrations in the atmosphere. During the LASE Validation Experiment, which was conducted over Wallops Island during September, 1995, LASE operated on either the strong water line for measurements in middle to upper troposphere, or on the weak water line for measurements made in the middle to lower troposphere including the boundary layer. Comparisons with water vapor measurements made by airborne dew point and frost point hygrometers, NASA/GSFC (Goddard Space Flight Center) Raman Lidar, and radiosondes showed the LASE water vapor mixing ratio measurements to have an accuracy of better than 6% or 0.01 g/kg, whichever is larger, throughout the troposphere. In addition to measuring water vapor mixing ratio profiles, LASE simultaneously measures aerosol backscattering profiles at the off-line wavelength near 815 nm from which atmospheric scattering ratio (ASR) profiles are calculated. ASR is defined as the ratio of total (aerosol + molecular) atmospheric scattering to molecular scattering. Assuming a region with very low aerosol loading can be identified, such as that typically found just below the tropopause, then the ASR can be determined. The ASR profiles are calculated by normalizing the scattering in the region containing enhanced aerosols to the expected scattering by the "clean" atmosphere at that altitude. Images of the total ASR clearly depict cloud regions, including multiple cloud layers, thin upper level cirrus, etc., throughout the troposphere. New data products that are being derived from the LASE aerosol and water measurements include: 1) aerosol extinction coefficient, 2) aerosol optical thickness, 3) precipitable water vapor, and 4) relative humidity (RH). These products can be compared with airborne in-situ, and ground and satellite remote sensing measurements,. This paper presents a preliminary examination of RH profiles in the middle to upper troposphere that are generated from LASE measured water vapor mixing ratio profiles coupled with rawinsonde profiles of temperature and pressure.
    Keywords: Environment Pollution
    Type: Nineteenth International Laser Radar Conference; 465-468; NASA/CP-1998-207671/PT1
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2004-12-03
    Description: Latent heat transfer through evaporation and condensation of water vapor is the most important energy transport mechanism in the atmosphere. In addition, water vapor is the most active greenhouse gas. Any global warming scenario must take accurate account of the spatial and temporal variation of water vapor in order to account for both of these effects. Due to the great importance of water vapor in atmospheric radiation studies, specific intensive operations periods (IOPs) have been hosted by the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program. One of the goals of these IOPs has been to determine the quality of and explain any discrepancies among a wide variety of water vapor measuring instruments. Raman lidar systems developed by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and DOE/Sandia National Laboratories have participated in the two Water Vapor IOPs (WVIOPs) held at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed Site (CART) site during 1996 (WVIOP1) and 1997 (WVIOP2). Detailed comparisons of these two systems is ongoing but this effort has already resulted in numerous improvements in design and data analysis for both lidar systems.
    Keywords: Instrumentation and Photography
    Type: Nineteenth International Laser Radar Conference; 285-288; NASA/CP-1998-207671/PT1
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2011-08-24
    Description: Solar and sky radiation measurements were analyzed to obtain aerosol properties such as the optical thickness and the size distribution. The measurements were conducted as part of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment during the second intensive field campaign (IFC) from June 25 to July 14, 1987, and the fifth IFC from July 25 to August 12, 1989, on the Konza Prairie near Manhattan, Kansas. Correlations with climatological and meteorological parameters show that during the period of observations in 1987, two types of air masses dominated the area: an air mass with low optical thickness and low temperature air associated with a northerly breeze, commonly referred to as the continental air, and an air mass with a higher optical thickness and higher temperature air associated with a southerly wind which we call 'Gulf air'. The size distributions show a predominance of the larger size particles in 'Gulf air'. Because of the presence of two contrasting air masses, correlations with parameters such as relative humidity, specific humidity, pressure, temperature, and North Star sky radiance reveal some interesting aspects. In 1989, clear distinctions between continental and Gulf air cannot be made; the reason for this will be discussed.
    Keywords: METEOROLOGY AND CLIMATOLOGY
    Type: Journal of Geophysical Research (ISSN 0148-0227); 97; D17; p. 18,769-18,778.
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2011-08-19
    Description: A technique for deriving large-scale pollution parameters from NIR and visible satellite remote-sensing images obtained over land or water is described and demonstrated on AVHRR images. The method is based on comparison of the upward radiances on clear and hazy days and permits simultaneous determination of aerosol optical thickness with error Delta tau(a) = 0.08-0.15, particle size with error + or - 100-200 nm, and single-scattering albedo with error + or - 0.03 (for albedos near 1), all assuming accurate and stable satellite calibration and stable surface reflectance between the clear and hazy days. In the analysis of AVHRR images of smoke from a forest fire, good agreement was obtained between satellite and ground-based (sun-photometer) measurements of aerosol optical thickness, but the satellite particle sizes were systematically greater than those measured from the ground. The AVHRR single-scattering albedo agreed well with a Landsat albedo for the same smoke.
    Keywords: GEOPHYSICS
    Type: Journal of Geophysical Research (ISSN 0148-0227); 95; 9895-990
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