ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Monograph available for loan
    Monograph available for loan
    New York [u.a.] : Springer
    Associated volumes
    Call number: AWI G6-92-0403
    In: Ecological studies
    Description / Table of Contents: Contents: Preface. - Contributors. - 1. Stable Isotopes: History, Units, and Instrumentation / J. R. Ehleringer and P. W. Rundel. - Section I Ecophysiological Studies in Plants. - 2.Carbon Isotope Fractionation and Plant Water-Use Efficiency / G. D. Farquhar, K. T. Hubick, A. G. Condon, and R. A. Richards. - 3. Carbon Isotope Ratios and Physiological Processes in Aridland Plants / J. R. Ehleringer. - 4. Stable Carbon Isotope Ratio as an Index of Water-Use Efficiency in C3 Halophytes - Possible Relationship to Strategies for Osmotic Adjustment / R. D. Guy, P. G. Warne, and D. M. Reid. - 5. Stable Carbon Isotopes in Vernal Pool Aquatics of Differing Photosynthetic Pathways / J. E. Keeley. - 6. Studies of Mechanisms Affecting the Fractionation of Carbon Isotopes in Photosynthesis / J. A. Berry. - 7. Intertree Variability of [Delta]I3C in Tree Rings / S. W. Leavitt, and A. Long. - 8. Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation in Plant Tissues / H. Ziegler. - 9. Oxygen and Hydrogen Isotope Ratios in Plant Cellulose: Mechanisms and Applications / L. Da Silveira Lobo Sternberg. - 10. Stable Hydrogen Isotope Ratios in Plants: A Review of Current Theory and Some Potential Applications / J. W. C. White. - Section II Animal Food Webs and Feeding Ecology. - 11. Stable Carbon Isotopes in Terrestrial Ecosystem Research / L. L. Tieszen and T. W. Boutton. - 12. [Delta]13C Measurements as Indicators of Carbon Flow in Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems / B. Fry and E. B. Sherr. - 13. Natural Carbon Isotope Tracers in Arctic Aquatic Food Webs / D. M. Schell and P. J. Ziemann. - 14. Some Problems and Potentials of Strontium Isotope Analysis for Human and Animal Ecology / J. E. Ericson. - 15. Natural Isotope Abundances in Bowhead Whale (Balaena mysticetus) Baleen: Markers of Aging and Habitat Usage / D. M. Schell, S. M. Saupe, and N. Haubenstock. - 16. Doubly-Labeled Water Studies of Vertebrate Physiological Ecology / K. A. NAGY. - 17. A [Delta]13C and [Delta]15N Tracer Study of Nutrition in Aquaculture: Penaeus vannamei in a Pond Growout System / P. L. Parker, R. K. Anderson, and A. Lawrence. - Section III Ecosystem Process Studies. - 18. Stable Isotope Ratios and the Dynamics of Caliche in Desert Soils / W. H. Schlesinger, G. M. Marion, and P. J. Fonteyn. - 19. The Use of Stable Isotopes in Assessing the Effect of Agriculture on Arid and Semi-Arid Soils / R. Amundson. - 20. Estimates of N2 Fixation in Ecosystems: The Need for and Basis of the 15N Natural Abundance Method / G. Shearer and D. H. Kohl. - 21. The Use of Variation in the Natural Abundance of 15N to Assess Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation by Woody Plants / R. A. Virginia, W. M. Jarrell, P. W. Rundel, G. Shearer, and D. H. Kohl. - 22. I3C/12C Ratios in Atmospheric Methane and Some of Its Sources / S. C. Tyler. - 23. Temperature-Dependent Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation in Cyanobacterial Sheaths: Applications to Studies of Modern and Precambrian Stromatolites / G. E. Strathearn. - 24. Sulfur Isotope Studies of the Pedosphere and Biosphere / H. R. Krouse. - 25. Sulfate Fertilization and Changes in Stable Sulfur Isotopic Compositions of Lake Sediments / B. Fry. - 26. The Use of Stable Sulfur and Nitrogen Isotopes in Studies of Plant Responses to Air Pollution / W. E. Winner, V. S. Berg, and P. J. Langston-Unkefer. - 27. The Use of Stable Sulfur Isotope Ratios in Air Pollution Studies: An Ecosystem Approach in South Florida / L. L. Jackson and L. P. Gough. - 28. 87Sr/86Sr Ratios Measure the Sources and Flow of Strontium in Terrestrial Ecosystems / W. C. Graustein. - Index.
    Description / Table of Contents: The analysis of stable isotope ratios represents one of the most exciting new technical advances in environmental sciences. In this book, leading experts offer the first survey of applications of stable isotope analysis to ecological research. Central topics are plant physiology studies, food webs and animal metabolism, bio-geochemical fluxes. Extensive coverage is given to natural isotopes of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and strontium in both terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Ecologists of diverse research interests, as well as agronomists, anthropologists, and geochemists, will value this overview for its wealth of information on theoretical background, experimental approaches, and technical design of studies utilizing stable isotope ratios.
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: XV, 525 S. : Ill.
    ISBN: 0387967125
    Series Statement: Ecological studies 68
    Branch Library: AWI Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    ISSN: 1435-0629
    Keywords: Key words: biosphere metabolism; carbon cycle; carbon fluxes; global change; terrestrial ecosystems.
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: ABSTRACT Understanding terrestrial carbon metabolism is critical because terrestrial ecosystems play a major role in the global carbon cycle. Furthermore, humans have severely disrupted the carbon cycle in ways that will alter the climate system and directly affect terrestrial metabolism. Changes in terrestrial metabolism may well be as important an indicator of global change as the changing temperature signal. Improving our understanding of the carbon cycle at various spatial and temporal scales will require the integration of multiple, complementary and independent methods that are used by different research communities. Tools such as air sampling networks, inverse numerical methods, and satellite data (top-down approaches) allow us to study the strength and location of the global- and continental-scale carbon sources and sinks. Bottom-up studies provide estimates of carbon fluxes at finer spatial scales and examine the mechanisms that control fluxes at the ecosystem, landscape, and regional scales. Bottom-up approaches include comparative and process studies (for example, ecosystem manipulative experiments) that provide the necessary mechanistic information to develop and validate terrestrial biospheric models. An iteration and reiteration of top-down and bottom-up approaches will be necessary to help constrain measurements at various scales. We propose a major international effort to coordinate and lead research programs of global scope of the carbon cycle.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    ISSN: 1365-2486
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology , Energy, Environment Protection, Nuclear Power Engineering , Geography
    Notes: The δ13C values of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) can be used to partition global patterns of CO2 source/sink relationships among terrestrial and oceanic ecosystems using the inversion technique. This approach is very sensitive to estimates of photosynthetic 13C discrimination by terrestrial vegetation (ΔA), and depends on δ13C values of respired CO2 fluxes (δ13CR). Here we show that by combining two independent data streams – the stable isotope ratios of atmospheric CO2 and eddy-covariance CO2 flux measurements – canopy scale estimates of ΔA can be successfully derived in terrestrial ecosystems. We also present the first weekly dataset of seasonal variations in δ13CR from dominant forest ecosystems in the United States between 2001 and 2003. Our observations indicate considerable summer-time variation in the weekly value of δ13CR within coniferous forests (4.0‰ and 5.4‰ at Wind River Canopy Crane Research Facility and Howland Forest, respectively, between May and September). The monthly mean values of δ13CR showed a smaller range (2–3‰), which appeared to significantly correlate with soil water availability. Values of δ13CR were less variable during the growing season at the deciduous forest (Harvard Forest). We suggest that the negative correlation between δ13CR and soil moisture content observed in the two coniferous forests should represent a general ecosystem response to the changes in the distribution of water resources because of climate change. Shifts in δ13CR and ΔA could be of sufficient magnitude globally to impact partitioning calculations of CO2 sinks between oceanic and terrestrial compartments.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    ISSN: 1365-3040
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: The carbon isotope composition of C4 grasses has the potential to be used as an indicator of changes in the isotopic composition and concentration of atmospheric CO2, especially for climate reconstruction. The usefulness of C4 grasses for this purpose hinges on the assumption that their photosynthetic discrimination against 13C remains constant in a wide range of environmental conditions. We tested this assumption by examining the effects of light and water stress on the carbon isotope composition of C4 grasses using different biochemical subtypes (NADP-ME, NAD-ME, PCK) in glasshouse experiments. We grew 14 different C4 grass species in four treatments: sun-watered, sun-drought, shade-watered and shade-drought. Carbon isotope discrimination (Δ) rarely remained constant. In general, Δ values were lowest in sun-watered grasses, greater for sun-drought plants and even higher for plants of the shade-watered treatment. The highest Δ values were generally found in the most stressed grasses, the shade-drought plants. Grasses of the NADP-ME subtype were the least influenced by a change in environmental variables, followed by PCK and NAD-ME subtypes. Water availability affected the carbon isotope discrimination less than light limitation in PCK and NAD-ME subtypes, but similarly in NADP-ME subtypes.In another experiment, we studied the effect of increasing light levels (150 to 1500 μmol photons m−2 s−1) on the Δ values of 18 well-watered C4 grass species. Carbon isotope discrimination remained constant until photon flux density (PFD) was less than 700 μmol photons m−2 s−1. Below this light level, Δ values increased with decreasing irradiance for all biochemical subtypes. The change in A was less pronounced in NADP-ME and PCK than in NAD-ME grasses. Grasses grown in the field and in the glasshouse showed a similar pattern. Thus, caution should be exercised when using C4 plants under varying environmental conditions to monitor the concentration or carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric CO2 in field/glasshouse studies or climate reconstruction.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    ISSN: 1365-3040
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Studies that quantify plant δ15N often assume that fractionation during nitrogen uptake and intra-plant variation in δ15N are minimal. We tested both assumptions by growing tomato (Lycopersicon esculetum Mill. cv. T-5) at NH4+ or NO−3 concentrations typical of those found in the soil. Fractionation did not occur with uptake; whole-plant δ15N was not significantly different from source δ15 N for plants grown on either nitrogen form. No intra-plant variation in δ15N was observed for plants grown with NH+4. In contrast. δ15N of leaves was as much as 5.8% greater than that of roots for plants grown with NO−3. The contrasting patterns of intra-plant variation are probably caused by different assimilation patterns. NH+4 is assimilated immediately in the root, so organic nitrogen in the shoot and root is the product of a single assimilation event. NO−3 assimilation can occur in shoots and roots. Fractionation during assimilation caused the δ15N of NO−3 to become enriched relative to organic nitrogen; the δ15N of NO−3 was 11.1 and 12.9% greater than the δ15N of organic nitrogen in leaves and roots, respectively. Leaf δ15N may therefore be greater than that of roots because the NO−3 available for assimilation in leaves originates from a NO−3 pool that was previously exposed to nitrate assimilation in the root.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    ISSN: 1365-3040
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Measurements of the ratio of deuterium to hydrogen (D/H) in stem xylem water were used to determine the relative uptake of summer precipitation by four co-occurring plant species in southern Utah. The species compared included two trees, Juniperus osteosperma and Pinus edulis, and two shrubs, Artemisia tridentata and Chrysothamnus nauseousus. There were significant differences among species in the relative use of summer precipitation. Chrysothamnus nauseosus had stem water D/H ratios in May through August 1990 that were not significantly different from that of groundwater. In contrast, the other three species had stem water D/H ratios that were intermediate between the groundwater value and summer precipitation values, indicating that a mixture of both precipitation and groundwater was being used by these species. The two tree species generally had higher D/H values than did A. tridentata indicating a higher average uptake of summer precipitation, although the roots of J. osteosperma and P. edulis may not be as responsive to small precipitation events as A. tridentata. There was a strong negative correlation between stem water D/H ratios and predawn water potential, which suggests a relationship between plant rooting pattern and water source use. In addition, water-use efficiency during photosynthetic gas exchange, calculated from leaf carbon isotope composition, differed among species and was strongly correlated with differences in the relative uptake of summer precipitation.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Plant, cell & environment 1 (1978), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1365-3040
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract. A comparison between two sympatric winter desert annuals, Camissonia claviformis and Malvastrum rotundi folium showed that both gained similar amounts of carbon during a spring day, although by very different means. Camissonia has horizontally fixed leaves which have a very high photosynthetic capacity. The temperature optimum of photosynthesis for this species is near 20°C. Malvastrum has leaves with a lower photosynthetic capacity and a photosynthetic temperature optimum near 30°C. Leaves of the latter species remain normal to the sun throughout the course of the day. The tracking response and high temperature optimum for photosynthesis of Malvastrum result in a high daily carbon gain and also a high water-use efficiency.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    ISSN: 1365-2486
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology , Energy, Environment Protection, Nuclear Power Engineering , Geography
    Notes: We tested the hypothesis that the stable carbon isotope signature of ecosystem respiration (δ13CR) was regulated by canopy conductance (Gc) using weekly Keeling plots (n=51) from a semiarid old-growth ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forest in Oregon, USA. For a comparison of forests in two contrasting climates we also evaluated trends in δ13CR from a wet 20-year-old Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) plantation located near the Pacific Ocean. Intraannual variability in δ13CR was greater than 8.0‰ at both sites, was highest during autumn, winter, and spring when rainfall was abundant, and lowest during summer drought. The δ13CR of the dry pine forest was consistently more positive than the wetter Douglas-fir forest (mean annual δ13CR: −25.41‰ vs. −26.23‰, respectively, P=0.07). At the Douglas-fir forest, δ13CR–climate relationships were consistent with predictions based on stomatal regulation of carbon isotope discrimination (Δ). Soil water content (SWC) and vapor pressure deficit (vpd) were the most important factors governing δ13CR in this forest throughout the year. In contrast, δ13CR at the pine forest was relatively insensitive to SWC or vpd, and exhibited a smaller drought-related enrichment (∼2‰) than the enrichment observed during drought at the Douglas-fir forest (∼5‰). Groundwater access at the pine forest may buffer canopy–gas exchange from drought. Despite this potential buffering, δ13CR at the pine forest was significantly but weakly related to canopy conductance (Gc), suggesting that δ13CR remains coupled to canopy–gas exchange despite groundwater access. During drought, δ13CR was strongly correlated with soil temperature at both forests. The hypothesis that canopy-level physiology is a critical regulator of δ13CR was supported; however, belowground respiration may become more important during rain-free periods.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Plant, cell & environment 9 (1986), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1365-3040
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract Leaves of Lotus scoparius Nutt., a Mediterranean-climate shrub, exhibited higher photosynthetic capacities when grown under winter (10/14 h, day/night) than summer (14/10 h) photo-periods, even though total daily photon irradiance was higher under summer photoperiods. Photosynthetic dependence on natural variations in photo-period, such that activity was higher under photo-periods associated with expected precipitation, may be a more dependable environmental parameter than total irradiance in temperate habitats with winter-spring precipitation patterns and where seasonal cloudiness may cause total daily irradiance levels to be highly variable.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    ISSN: 1365-3040
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Photosynthetic gas exchange and the stable isotopic composition of foliage water were measured for a xylem tapping mistletoe, Phoradendron juniperinum, and its host tree, Juniperus osteosperma, growing in southern Utah. The observed isotopic composition of water extracted from foliage was compared to predictions of the Craig-Gordon model of isotopic enrichment at evaporative sites within leaves. Assimilation rates of juniper were higher and stomatal conductance was lower than the values observed for the mistletoe. This resulted in lower intercellular/ ambient CO2 values in the juniper tree relative to its mistletoe parasite. For mistletoe, the observed foliage water hydrogen and oxygen isotopic enrichment was less than that predicted by the model. In juniper, foliage water hydrogen isotopic enrichment was also lower than that predicted by the evaporative enrichment model. In contrast, the oxygen isotopic enrichment in juniper foliage water was slightly greater than that predicted for the evaporative sites within leaves. Hydrogen isotopic enrichment in mistletoe foliage shows systematic variation with stem segment, being highest near the tips of the youngest stems and decreasing toward the base of the mistletoe, where isotopic composition is close to that of stem water in the host tree. In a correlated pattern, mid-day stomatal conductance declined abruptly in mistletoe foliage of increasing age.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...