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  • 1
    Call number: MOP 3805
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: XXXI, 286 S.
    Location: MOP - must be ordered
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
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  • 2
    Description / Table of Contents: This book is an outgrowth of a workshop on teaching mineralogy held at Smith College in June 1996 and sponsored by a grant from the Division of Undergraduate Education, National Science Foundation (DUE-9554635). Seventy participants, from diverse institutional settings and from all academic ranks, met to explore common interests in improving instruction in mineralogy. At the workshop, participants took part as both instructors and as students. They had the opportunity to explore a variety of new instructional methods and materials and also to observe their colleagues as instructors. All were encouraged to test these activities in their own classrooms, to evaluate their effectiveness, to suggest changes to the authors, and to develop new and complementary exercises. The sourcebook before you is the product of this group effort. Within this volume you will find numerous exercises that can be applied in the teaching of mineralogy and related courses. There are hands-on, experimental, theoretical, and analytical exercises. All have been written with the hope of optimizing student learning. At the workshop there was little interest in developing a "prescriptive" approach to mineralogy by making recommendations on a specific content that might be universally applied in mineralogy courses and curricula. We recognize that every student population will have different needs, every faculty vi member will have her or his own areas expertise, every department will have its own curricular needs, every institution will have its own resources, and every geographic setting will provide unique educational opportunities. The exercises in this volume provide examples of innovative ways that mineralogy can be taught using a variety of materials and teaching techniques. We encourage you to use these activities in whatever ways will best serve your students. You may freely photocopy the exercises for class use, adopt these materials or adapt them to meet the special needs of your own course, and use these activities as models to help you develop your own new exercises.
    Pages: Online-Ressource (VIII, 406 Seiten)
    ISBN: 9780939950447
    Language: English
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2016-01-20
    Description: Near a black hole, differential rotation of a magnetized accretion disk is thought to produce an instability that amplifies weak magnetic fields, driving accretion and outflow. These magnetic fields would naturally give rise to the observed synchrotron emission in galaxy cores and to the formation of relativistic jets, but no observations to date have been able to resolve the expected horizon-scale magnetic-field structure. We report interferometric observations at 1.3-millimeter wavelength that spatially resolve the linearly polarized emission from the Galactic Center supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A*. We have found evidence for partially ordered magnetic fields near the event horizon, on scales of ~6 Schwarzschild radii, and we have detected and localized the intrahour variability associated with these fields.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Johnson, Michael D -- Fish, Vincent L -- Doeleman, Sheperd S -- Marrone, Daniel P -- Plambeck, Richard L -- Wardle, John F C -- Akiyama, Kazunori -- Asada, Keiichi -- Beaudoin, Christopher -- Blackburn, Lindy -- Blundell, Ray -- Bower, Geoffrey C -- Brinkerink, Christiaan -- Broderick, Avery E -- Cappallo, Roger -- Chael, Andrew A -- Crew, Geoffrey B -- Dexter, Jason -- Dexter, Matt -- Freund, Robert -- Friberg, Per -- Gold, Roman -- Gurwell, Mark A -- Ho, Paul T P -- Honma, Mareki -- Inoue, Makoto -- Kosowsky, Michael -- Krichbaum, Thomas P -- Lamb, James -- Loeb, Abraham -- Lu, Ru-Sen -- MacMahon, David -- McKinney, Jonathan C -- Moran, James M -- Narayan, Ramesh -- Primiani, Rurik A -- Psaltis, Dimitrios -- Rogers, Alan E E -- Rosenfeld, Katherine -- SooHoo, Jason -- Tilanus, Remo P J -- Titus, Michael -- Vertatschitsch, Laura -- Weintroub, Jonathan -- Wright, Melvyn -- Young, Ken H -- Zensus, J Anton -- Ziurys, Lucy M -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Dec 4;350(6265):1242-5. doi: 10.1126/science.aac7087. Epub 2015 Dec 3.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. mjohnson@cfa.harvard.edu. ; Haystack Observatory, Route 40, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Westford, MA 01886, USA. ; Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. Haystack Observatory, Route 40, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Westford, MA 01886, USA. ; Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065, USA. ; Department of Astronomy, Radio Astronomy Laboratory, 501 Campbell, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411, USA. ; Department of Physics MS-057, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA 02454-0911. ; Haystack Observatory, Route 40, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Westford, MA 01886, USA. National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan. Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan. ; Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Post Office Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan. ; Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. ; Academia Sinica Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA), 645 N. A'ohoku Pl. Hilo, HI 96720, USA. ; Department of Astrophysics/Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics, Radboud University Nijmegen, Post Office Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen, Netherlands. ; Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline Street North, Waterloo, ON N2L 2Y5, Canada. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada. ; Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse 1, 85748 Garching, Germany. ; James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, East Asia Observatory, 660 N. A'ohoku Place, University Park, Hilo, HI 96720, USA. ; Department of Physics, Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland at College Park, Physical Sciences Complex, College Park, MD 20742, USA. ; National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan. Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mitaka, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588. ; Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. Haystack Observatory, Route 40, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Westford, MA 01886, USA. Department of Physics MS-057, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA 02454-0911. ; Max-Planck-Institut fur Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hugel 69, D-53121 Bonn, Germany. ; Owens Valley Radio Observatory, California Institute of Technology, 100 Leighton Lane, Big Pine, CA 93513-0968, USA. ; Haystack Observatory, Route 40, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Westford, MA 01886, USA. Max-Planck-Institut fur Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hugel 69, D-53121 Bonn, Germany. ; Department of Astrophysics/Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics, Radboud University Nijmegen, Post Office Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen, Netherlands. Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Post Office Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden, Netherlands.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26785487" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2015-12-03
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    ISSN: 1573-9686
    Keywords: Valve closing dynamics ; Occluder flexibility ; Mechanical heart-valve
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine , Technology
    Notes: Abstract Negative pressure transients (NPT) recorded in a single closing event of mechanical valves in the mitral position in an in vitro setup are compared with data recorded in the left atrium in vivo with the valves implanted in the mitral position in an animal model. The loading at valve closure (dP/dt_CL) computed from the in vivo ventricular pressure recording (ranging from 700 to 2300 mm Hg/s) agreed with the magnitudes predicted in our earlier in vitro experiments (750-3000 mm Hg/s). The NPT signals and the corresponding power spectral density plots from the in vivo data were in qualitative agreement with those recorded in vitro. The NPT magnitudes were found to be below the vapor pressure for blood in mechanical valves with rigid occluders suggesting a potential for the valve to cavitate in vivo. Our in vivo results also suggest that the valves with flexible occluders are less likely to cavitate. The correlation of the in vitro and in vivo data also suggests that the flexibility of valve housing used in the in vitro studies is not an important factor in the dynamics of mechanical valve closure in vivo. © 1998 Biomedical Engineering Society. PAC98: 8745Hw, 8790+y
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 6
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    Saranac Lake, N.Y., etc. : Periodicals Archive Online (PAO)
    Management Review. 49:2 (1960:Feb.) 23 
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  • 7
    ISSN: 1573-2614
    Keywords: Linear models ; statistical models ; operating room information systems ; operating rooms ; linear programming ; robust estimation
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Computer Science , Medicine
    Notes: Abstract We present a statistical model for predicting the time to complete a series of successive, elective surgical cases. The use of sample means of case times and turnover times when scheduling cases does not minimize the operating room labor costs associated with errors in predicting times to complete series of cases. The problem of minimizing associated labor costs (both under and over utilization) can be converted to the problem of least absolute deviation regression. The dependent variables are the times to complete series of cases. The independent variables are the numbers of cases in each series that are in various categories (i.e., combinations of scheduled procedures and surgeons). Although the computational method is preferred on theoretical grounds to that involving sample means, application of both methods shows that the more practical method is to use the sample means of previous case times and turnovers.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    ISSN: 1573-0875
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    ISSN: 1573-0875
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    ISSN: 1573-2614
    Keywords: Automated anesthesia information system ; cesarean section ; malpractice claim ; reference limit ; reference value
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Computer Science , Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Introduction. We evaluated whether automated anesthesia information systems can be used to calculate reference limits (population-based “normal values”) for vital signs. We considered four populations of women undergoing cesarean section: healthy under spinal anesthesia, healthy under general anesthesia, pre-eclamptic/eclamptic under spinal anesthesia, and pre-eclamptic/eclamptic under general anesthesia. Methods. Reference limits were calculated for each of the study populations by determination of percentiles for: minimum heart rate, maximum heart rate, minimum arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO2), minimum mean arterial pressure (MAP), maximum MAP, decrease in MAP, and increase in MAP. Results.There was one adverse anesthetic outcome among the 1,300 women in the study; the woman sustained a post-dural puncture headache. The 5th percentiles of SaO2 were at least 95% saturation under spinal versus90% under general. Under spinal anesthesia, 95th percentiles for decreases in MAP from baseline were 63 mmHg for healthy and 75 mmHg for pre-eclamptic/eclamptic women. Under general anesthesia, the 95th percentiles for maximum MAP were 161 and 177 mmHg, respectively. Two women of the 1,300 patients experienced simultaneously a minimum SaO2 〈92% and minimum MAP 〈50 mmHg. Discussion. Automated anesthesia information systems can be used to determine reference limits for vital signs during anesthesia. Reference limits may play a role in malpractice cases when an expert claims that care by an anesthesiologist was sub-standard as shown by vital signs that were not maintained within the normal range during the critical portions of an anesthetic. Automated anesthesia information systems may enhance expert witnesses’ clinical judgment.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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