ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Collection
Keywords
Years
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2019-07-12
    Description: This report presents the Bouee pour l'acquisition de Series Optiques a Long Terme (BOUSSOLE) project, the primary objectives of which are to provide a long-term time series of optical properties in support of a) calibration and validation activities associated with satellite ocean color missions, and b) bio-optical research in oceanic waters. The following are included in the report: 1) an introduction to the rationale for establishing the project; 2) a definition of vicarious calibration and the specific requirements attached to it; 3) the organization of the project and the characteristics of the measurement site--in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea; 4) a qualitative overview of the collected data; 5) details about the buoy that was specifically designed and built for this project; 6) data collection protocols and data processing techniques; 7) a quantitative summary of the collected data, and a discussion of some sample results, including match-up analyses for the currently operational ocean color sensors, namely MERIS, SeaWiFS, and MODIS; and 8) preliminary results of the vicarious radiometric calibration of MERIS, including a tentative uncertainty budget. The results of this match-up analysis allow performance comparisons of various ocean color sensors to be performed, demonstrating the ability of the BOUSSOLE activity, i.e., combining a dedicated platform and commercial-off-the-shelf instrumentation, to provide data qualified to monitor the quality of ocean color products on the long term.
    Keywords: Oceanography
    Type: NASA/TM-2006-214147 , Rept-2007-00282-0
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Sauzède, Raphaëlle; Lavigne, Héloise; Claustre, Hervé; Uitz, Julia; Schmechtig, Catherine; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Guinet, Christophe; Pesant, Stephane (2015): Vertical distribution of chlorophyll a concentration and phytoplankton community composition from in situ fluorescence profiles: a first database for the global ocean. Earth System Science Data, 7(2), 261-273, https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-7-261-2015
    Publication Date: 2020-01-17
    Description: In vivo chlorophyll a fluorescence, a proxy of chlorophyll a concentration, is one of the most frequently measured biogeochemical property in the ocean. Thousands of profiles are available from historical databases and the integration of fluorescence sensors to autonomous platforms led to a significant increase of chlorophyll fluorescence profiles acquisition. To date, benefits of such numerous data available have not yet been included in global analysis. A total of 268,184 raw chlorophyll fluorescence profiles were collected and subjected to a 10-steps quality control procedure (see supplementary literature publication). The present data product was generated from the remaining 48,600 chlorophyll fluorescence profiles. These were inter-calibrated, converted to total chlorophyll a concentration and phytoplankton community composition (i.e. microphytoplankton, nanophytoplankton and picophytoplankton) using the FLAVOR method (see further details). The data span a time period of 1958-2015, with observations from all oceanic basins and all seasons, and with depths ranging from the surface to a median sampling maximum depth of around 700m. The present data product was obtained by modelling phytoplankton biomass and composition from in situ fluorescence profiles and therefore, individual profiles should NOT BE USED as discrete observations. The correct use of the present data product is to investigate regional or temporal trends, for example to improve the open ocean climatologies of chlorophyll a concentration. This data product is intended as a living data set, with the expectation to retrieve and model additional in situ chlorophyll fluorescence profiles, especially from autonomous acquisition platforms.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/zip, 397.0 MBytes
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Sauzède, Raphaëlle; Lavigne, Héloise; Claustre, Hervé; Uitz, Julia; Schmechtig, Catherine; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Guinet, Christophe; Pesant, Stephane (2015): Vertical distribution of chlorophyll a concentration and phytoplankton community composition from in situ fluorescence profiles: a first database for the global ocean. Earth System Science Data, 7(2), 261-273, https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-7-261-2015
    Publication Date: 2020-01-17
    Description: The present data set includes 268,127 vertical in situ fluorescence profiles obtained from several available online databases and from published and unpublished individual sources. Metadata about each profiles are given in the file provided here in further details. The majority of profiles comes from the National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) and the fluorescence profiles acquired by Bio-Argo floats available on the Oceanographic Autonomous Observations (OAO) platform (63.7% and 12.5% respectively). Different modes of acquisition were used to collect the data presented in this study: (1) CTD profiles are acquired using a fluorometer mounted on a CTD-rosette; (2) OSD (Ocean Station Data) profiles are derived from water samples and are defined as low resolution profiles; (3) the UOR (Undulating Oceanographic Recorder) profiles are acquired by a 〈fish〉 equipped with a fluorometer and towed by a research vessel; (4) PA profiles are acquired by autonomous platforms (here profiling floats or elephant seals equipped with a fluorometer). Data acquired from gliders are not included in the compilation.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/zip, 639.0 MBytes
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-09-03
    Description: As commonly observed in oligotrophic stratified waters, a Subsurface (or Deep) Chlorophyll Maximum (SCM) frequently characterizes the vertical distribution of phytoplankton chlorophyll in the Mediterranean Sea. Occurring far from the surface layer seen by ocean color satellites, SCMs are difficult to observe with adequate spatio-temporal resolution and their biogeochemical impact remains unknown. BioGeochemical-Argo (BGC-Argo) profiling floats represent appropriate tools for studying the dynamics of SCMs. Based on data collected from 36 BGC-Argo floats deployed in the Mediterranean Sea, our study aims to address two main questions: (1) What are the different types of SCMs in Mediterranean Sea? (2) Which environmental factors control their occurrence and dynamics? First, we analyzed the seasonal and regional variations of the chlorophyll concentration (Chla), particulate backscattering coefficient (bbp), a proxy of the Particulate Organic Carbon (POC), and environmental parameters (PAR and nitrates) within the SCM layer over the Mediterranean basin. The vertical profiles of Chla and bbp were then statistically classified, and the seasonal occurrence of each of the different types of SCMs quantified. Finally, a case study was performed on two contrasted regions and the environmental conditions at depth were further investigated to understand which parameter controls the SCMs. In the Eastern Basin, SCMs result, at a first order, from photoacclimation process. Conversely, SCMs in the Western Basin reflect a biomass increase at depth benefiting from both light and nitrate resources. Our results also suggest that a variety of intermediate types of SCMs are encountered between these two end-member situations.
    Print ISSN: 1810-6277
    Electronic ISSN: 1810-6285
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-07-19
    Description: In the north Ionian, water circulation is characterized by a decadal alternation of cyclonic and anticyclonic regime driven by the mechanism called BiOS (bimodal oscillating system). The circulation regimes affect both vertical dynamics and the nutrient distribution. The north Ionian is then a good study area to investigate how changes in circulation can affect phytoplankton dynamics in oligotrophic regions. From in situ observations, for each circulation regime the averaged distribution of isopycnals is provided, and a depth difference of about 80m is estimated for the nitracline between the cyclonic and anticyclonic regime. Based on phytoplankton phenology metrics extracted from annual time series of satellite ocean color data for the period 1998–2012, the cyclonic and anticyclonic regimes are compared. Results show that the average chlorophyll in March, the date of bloom onset and the date of maximum chlorophyll were affected by circulation patterns in the north Ionian. In the center of the north Ionian gyre, the bloom started in December and chlorophyll was low in March when circulation was anticyclonic, whereas during the cyclonic circulation regime, a late chlorophyll peak, likely resulting from different phytoplankton dynamics, was commonly observed in March. An additional analysis shows that the winter buoyancy losses, which govern the mixed layer depth (MLD), also contribute to explaining the interannual variability in bloom onset and intensity. Two trophic regimes were then identified in the north Ionian gyre (NIG) and they could be explained with the relative position of the MLD and nitracline. The first one is characterized by an early winter bloom onset and the absence of a chlorophyll peak in March. It was observed when circulation was anticyclonic or when winter MLD was relatively shallow. Dominant regenerated production all year and an absence of significant nutrient supplies to surface waters are proposed to explain this trophic regime. Conversely, the second trophic regime is marked by a bloom onset in late winter (i.e., February) and a chlorophyll peak in March. The chlorophyll increase was interpreted as a direct response to the nutrient enrichment of surface waters. This winter–spring bloom was observed when circulation was cyclonic and when winter mixing was relatively strong.
    Print ISSN: 1726-4170
    Electronic ISSN: 1726-4189
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2017-11-22
    Description: Since 2012, an array of 105 Biogeochemical-Argo (BGC-Argo) floats has been deployed across the world's oceans to assist in filling observational gaps that are required for characterizing open-ocean environments. Profiles of biogeochemical (chlorophyll and dissolved organic matter) and optical (single-wavelength particulate optical backscattering, downward irradiance at three wavelengths, and photosynthetically available radiation) variables are collected in the upper 1000m every 1 to 10 days. The database of 9837 vertical profiles collected up to January 2016 is presented and its spatial and temporal coverage is discussed. Each variable is quality controlled with specifically developed procedures and its time series is quality-assessed to identify issues related to biofouling and/or instrument drift. A second database of 5748 profile-derived products within the first optical depth (i.e., the layer of interest for satellite remote sensing) is also presented and its spatiotemporal distribution discussed. This database, devoted to field and remote ocean color applications, includes diffuse attenuation coefficients for downward irradiance at three narrow wavebands and one broad waveband (photosynthetically available radiation), calibrated chlorophyll and fluorescent dissolved organic matter concentrations, and single-wavelength particulate optical backscattering. To demonstrate the applicability of these databases, data within the first optical depth are compared with previously established bio-optical models and used to validate remotely derived bio-optical products. The quality-controlled databases are publicly available from the SEANOE (SEA scieNtific Open data Edition) publisher at https://doi.org/10.17882/49388 and https://doi.org/10.17882/47142 for vertical profiles and products within the first optical depth, respectively.
    Print ISSN: 1866-3508
    Electronic ISSN: 1866-3516
    Topics: Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2017-12-18
    Description: In the North Ionian, water circulation is characterized by a decadal alternation of cyclonic and anticyclonic regime driven by the mechanism called BiOS (Bimodal Oscillating System). The circulation regime affects the vertical dynamics and the nutrient distribution. The North Ionian is then a good study area to investigate how changes in circulation can affect phytoplankton dynamics in oligotrophic regions. From in situ observations, for each circulation regime the averaged distribution of isopycnals is provided, and a depth difference of about 80 m is estimated for the nitracline between cyclonic and anticyclonic regime. Based on phytoplankton phenology metrics extracted from annual time-series of satellite ocean color data for the period 1998–2012, the cyclonic and anticyclonic regimes are compared. Results show that the average chlorophyll in March, the date of bloom initiation and the date of maximum chlorophyll were affected by circulation patterns in the North Ionian. In the center of the gyre, bloom initiation occurred in December and chlorophyll was low in March when circulation was anticyclonic, whereas during the cyclonic circulation regime, a late chlorophyll peak, likely resulting from different phytoplankton dynamics, was commonly observed in March. An additional analysis shows that the winter buoyancy losses, which govern the Mixed Layer Depth (MLD) also contribute to explain the interannual variability in bloom initiation and intensity. Two scenarios involving the relative position of the MLD and nitracline are finally developed, discussed and tested with model data to explain the different phenology patterns observed in the North Ionian.
    Print ISSN: 1810-6277
    Electronic ISSN: 1810-6285
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2019-07-01
    Description: New autonomous robotic platforms for observing the ocean, i.e. Biogeochemical-Argo (BGC-Argo) floats, have drastically increased the number of vertical profiles of irradiance, photosynthetically available radiation (PAR), and algal chlorophyll concentrations around the globe independent of the season. Such data may therefore be a fruitful resource to improve performances of numerical models for marine biogeochemistry. Here we present a work that integrates 1314 vertical profiles of PAR acquired by 31 BGC-Argo floats operated in the Mediterranean Sea between 2012 and 2016 into a one-dimensional model to simulate the vertical and temporal variability of algal chlorophyll concentrations. The model was initially forced with PAR measurements to assess its skill when using quality-controlled light profiles, and subsequently with a number of alternative bio-optical models to analyse the model capability when light observations are not available. Model outputs were evaluated against co-located chlorophyll profiles measured by BGC-Argo floats. Results highlight that the data-driven model is able to reproduce the spatial and temporal variability of deep chlorophyll maxima depth observed at a number of Mediterranean sites well. Further, we illustrate the key role of PAR and vertical mixing in shaping the vertical dynamics of primary producers in the Mediterranean Sea. The comparison of alternative bio-optical models identifies the best simple one to be used, and suggests that model simulations benefit from considering the diel cycle.
    Print ISSN: 1726-4170
    Electronic ISSN: 1726-4189
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2019-04-01
    Description: As commonly observed in oligotrophic stratified waters, a subsurface (or deep) chlorophyll maximum (SCM) frequently characterizes the vertical distribution of phytoplankton chlorophyll in the Mediterranean Sea. Occurring far from the surface layer “seen” by ocean colour satellites, SCMs are difficult to observe with adequate spatio-temporal resolution and their biogeochemical impact remains unknown. Biogeochemical-Argo (BGC-Argo) profiling floats represent appropriate tools for studying the dynamics of SCMs. Based on data collected from 36 BGC-Argo floats deployed in the Mediterranean Sea, our study aims to address two main questions. (1) What are the different types of SCMs in the Mediterranean Sea? (2) Which environmental factors control their occurrence and dynamics? First, we analysed the seasonal and regional variations in the chlorophyll concentration (Chl a), particulate backscattering coefficient (bbp), a proxy of the particulate organic carbon (POC) and environmental parameters (photosynthetically active radiation and nitrates) within the SCM layer over the Mediterranean Basin. The vertical profiles of Chl a and bbp were then statistically classified and the seasonal occurrence of each of the different types of SCMs quantified. Finally, a case study was performed on two contrasted regions and the environmental conditions at depth were further investigated to understand the main controls on the SCMs. In the eastern basin, SCMs result, at a first order, from a photoacclimation process. Conversely, SCMs in the western basin reflect a biomass increase at depth benefiting from both light and nitrate resources. Our results also suggest that a variety of intermediate types of SCMs are encountered between these two endmember situations.
    Print ISSN: 1726-4170
    Electronic ISSN: 1726-4189
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2018-07-30
    Description: The present work is based on a dataset comprised of 31 Biogeochemical (BGC) Argo floats that collected 0–1000m vertical profiles of biogeochemical and optical data from 2012 to 2016 in the Mediterranean Sea. The dataset was integrated in 1-dimensional model simulations following the trajectories of each float and considering measured photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) profiles as the reference light parameterization. The simulations were aimed to be consistent with data measured by float sensors, especially in terms of the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) depth. Moreover, we tested several light models in order to estimate their impact on modeled biogeochemical properties, including self-shading dynamics based on chlorophyll and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) concentrations. The results, evaluated with the corresponding in-situ BGC-Argo chlorophyll data, indicate that the proposed approach allows to properly simulate the chlorophyll dynamics and illustrate how PAR and vertical mixing are essential environmental regulation factors driving primary producers dynamics. The higher skills are reached using in-situ PAR, but some of the alternative bio-optical models here presented show comparable skill in reproducing DCM depth spatial variability. Simulation results show that during the stratification phase the diel cycle has significant impact on the surface chlorophyll regimes. The approach here presented serves as a computationally smooth solution to analyse BGC-Argo floats data and to corroborate hypotheses on their spatio-temporal variability.
    Print ISSN: 1810-6277
    Electronic ISSN: 1810-6285
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...