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  • 1
    ISSN: 1095-8649
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Two species of the family Bothidae (lefteye flounders), Mancopsetta maculata metadata and M. milfordi occur in the south-west Atlantic but are caught rarely by commercial bottom trawlers. Little is therefore known about their general biology from this area. A total of 251 M. maculata and 276 M. milfordi were sampled during deep-water exploratory fishing conducted in November 1994 within the Falkland Islands Interim and Outer Conservation Zones, at depths of 400-1000 m, using standard commercial bottom trawling gear. The two species were found to have similar geographical distributions between 48.30′-53.30'S and 55°-62° W and were often obtained at the same stations in depths of 400-900 m on the continental slope. Mancopsetta maculata maculata showed a uni-modal cohort structure with a modal length at the 29-cm total length size-class. Males of M. m. maculata outnumbered females in a ratio of 3.5 : 1. Mancopsetta milfordi showed a tri-modal length distribution, the main mode at the 37-cm total length size-class, with females outnumbering males in a ratio of 1.1 : 1. Length-weight relationships and length-at-age information are presented for the two species. Diet was determined from the analysis of stomach contents and, although the major prey type for both species consisted of crustaceans, the morid fish Austrophycis marginata also formed an important part of the diet of M. milfordi. Key words: Mancopsetta maculata maculata; Mancopsetta milfordi; distribution; south-west Atlantic; size; diet.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1095-8649
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Nezumia aequalis is one of the most abundant fishes on the upper and middle continental slopes (500–1750 m depth zones) of the North-east Atlantic with a peak abundance of three to four individuals 1000 m−2 swept area in the 750-m zone. Mean and modal size increased with depth, fish from the Rockall Trough (RT) being larger than those at equivalent depths in the Porcupine Seabight (PSB). Sex ratios were close to parity in all depth zones. Females grew larger than males. Head length to total length and to total weight did not differ significantly between sexes but RT fish were heavier at any given length than PSB fish. Serial batch spawning occurred over the first three quarters of the year. Ovaries contained five size groups of eggs, the three largest groups being vitelline and contributing 27% of the absolute individual fecundity which was positively correlated with body size and ranged from 9109 to 26 847. Age determined from sagittal otoliths ranged from 1 to 10 years, the ageing method being validated by a time-series study of the growing edge of otoliths. The von Bertalanffy growth parameter (k) was estimated at 0·175 and 0·216 from head length and otolith length, respectively.
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  • 3
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Journal of fish biology 33 (1988), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1095-8649
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Solea solea start to appear in the Tamar Estuary in April–May when they are 10 mm long. The majority of young sole move into the estuary in June–July. Most sole leave the estuary towards the end of their second year in October–November, when they have reached a total length of 150–200 mm. The young O-group fish remain in the main channel, whereas the I-group move with the tide onto the mud-flats.Approximately 7000 fish were marked by freeze-branding or dye-injection. The recaptures showed that there was an up-estuary migration in May–June. Most of the recaptures were taken at the site of original capture and there was only a limited movement of fish between adjacent mud-flat areas. Average growth rate tends to be greater in sole inhabiting the upper reaches of the estuary.
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  • 4
    ISSN: 1095-8649
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Notacanthid fishes were among the 10 most abundant species sampled in research surveys using fine meshed trawls fished to depths of 3000 m in the Rockall Trough and 4500 m in the Porcupine Seabight between 1975 and 1992. Two species, Noctacanthus bonapartei and Polyacanthonotus rissoanus, were dominant but their population structure and certain aspects of morphometric and reproductive biology differed between the two sampling areas. In general, sex ratios were skewed in favour of females, size increased with depth and male and immature individuals were restricted to shallower depth zones. Fecundity was highly correlated with total weight and showed a positive relationship with species' size. Ovaries contained two batches of eggs and the spawning season was protracted, occurring mostly over winter months. Dietary studies showed a dependence on benthic macro fauna though the two dominant species have different dentition and exploit different trophic niches. In the Rockall Trough, peak abundances for N. bonapartei and P. rissoanus occurred in the 750 m and 1250 m zones, respectively, lying within the depth range currently exploited by commercial deep-water trawls (600–1400 m). The probable impacts of commercial operations on notacanthid fishes are discussed.
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  • 5
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Journal of fish biology 49 (1996), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1095-8649
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Records of demersal deep-sea fish assemblages in waters around the Falkland Islands (Patagonian shelf area) are rare. Twenty deep-water stations to the east and south of the Falkland Islands were sampled by commercial bottom trawl deployed in upper, middle and lower benthopelagic zones (depth range of approximately 500-1000 m). Forty-one species (22 families) of teleost fish were recorded, 10 species (two families) of elasmobranch and one species of agnathan. Different assemblages of fish were found to characterize each depth zone (e.g. Moridae in deeper waters, Bothidae and Rajidae in shallower waters), with diversity being greatest in the mid-zone and biomass greatest in the upper and lower zones. Some species occurred in all zones but showed depth-related abundance. Four species, namely the grenadiers Macrourus carinutus and Coelorhynchus fasciatus, the southern blue whiting Micromesistius australis, and the Patagonian toothfish Dissostichus eleginoides, accounted for 85% by weight of all fish caught. Quantitative sampling of selected species revealed depth-related variations in their population structure. Length-frequency analyses are presented for M. carinatus and D. eleginoides and show a tendency for larger individuals to inhabit deeper water. Discard rates from the commercial catch were sometimes high, particularly for the smaller species, raising concerns about the impact of a fishery on by-catch species. The potential for deep-sea fisheries in Falkland waters is discussed and further studies are suggested in the light of developing oil, gas and fishing industries. The presence of some invertebrate taxa is recorded.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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